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The Hollow Men Analysis



Author: Poetry of T.S. Eliot Type: Poetry Views: 5289

I

We are the hollow men
We are the stuffed men
Leaning together
Headpiece filled with straw. Alas!
Our dried voices, when
We whisper together
Are quiet and meaningless
As wind in dry grass
Or rats' feet over broken glass
In our dry cellar

Shape without form, shade without colour,
Paralysed force, gesture without motion;

Those who have crossed
With direct eyes, to death's other Kingdom
Remember us -- if at all -- not as lost
Violent souls, but only
As the hollow men
The stuffed men.

II

Eyes I dare not meet in dreams
In death's dream kingdom
These do not appear:
There, the eyes are
Sunlight on a broken column
There, is a tree swinging
And voices are
In the wind's singing
More distant and more solemn
Than a fading star.

Let me be no nearer
In death's dream kingdom
Let me also wear
Such deliberate disguises
Rat's coat, crowskin, crossed staves
In a field
Behaving as the wind behaves
No nearer --

Not that final meeting
In the twilight kingdom

III

This is the dead land
This is cactus land
Here the stone images
Are raised, here they receive
The supplication of a dead man's hand
Under the twinkle of a fading star.

Is it like this
In death's other kingdom
Waking alone
At the hour when we are
Trembling with tenderness
Lips that would kiss
Form prayers to broken stone.

IV

The eyes are not here
There are no eyes here
In this valley of dying stars
In this hollow valley
This broken jaw of our lost kingdoms

In this last of meeting places
We grope together
And avoid speech
Gathered on this beach of the tumid river

Sightless, unless
The eyes reappear
As the perpetual star
Multifoliate rose
Of death's twilight kingdom
The hope only
Of empty men.

V

Here we go round the prickly pear
Prickly pear prickly pear
Here we go round the prickly pear
At five o'clock in the morning.

Between the idea
And the reality
Between the motion
And the act
Falls the Shadow

For Thine is the Kingdom

Between the conception
And the creation
Between the emotion
And the response
Falls the Shadow

Life is very long

Between the desire
And the spasm
Between the potency
And the existence
Between the essence
And the descent
Falls the Shadow
For Thine is the Kingdom

For Thine is
Life is
For Thine is the

This is the way the world ends
This is the way the world ends
This is the way the world ends
Not with a bang but a whimper.





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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

It\'s all about emptiness and entropy. There is no apocalypse, merely a winding down of all of the \"systems\" that humanity has built (which many commentators astutely reference). I know Eliot did not convert to the Anglican church until 1927, and this poem pre-dates that; but there seem to be allusions to some of the dead being in The Other Kingdom. Maybe it\'s Eliot coming to gripsw with spirituality and emptiness. I have re-read the poem, and used it in classes that I teach, but I am still ambivalent about reading to much autobiography into the work.

| Posted on 2012-11-05 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem is a clearly a masterpiece, I don\'t see myself as a master of poetry (not to imply that others do) and when it comes to masterpieces of this poem\'s caliber you can\'t box them into one category such as; \'The Lost Generation of The Great War\', \'T.S. Eliot\'s path to religion\' or indeed one so broad as \'The representation of society\' aimlessness\', no, with a poem such as this you must consider all of these. The most famous lines of the poem come with the last stanza and for a reason too. ;
\"This is the way the world ends
This is the way the world ends
This is the way the world ends
Not with a bang but a whimper.\"
I remember reading those lines when I was very young and barely understanding them, but I still felt Eliot\'s passion and anguish, I still knew that there was emotion to be felt even if I wasn\'t sure why and that, to me, is what constitutes truly masterful poetry.
Now that I am older (15) I acknowledge the reference it\'s making to Guy Fawkes, the Gunpowder Plot didn\'t end with the powerful, triumphant, satisfying bang that was intended, it ended with the whimper of a hero as he was hung, drawn and quartered. I believe this is also Eliot\'s beliefs on war, that bombs and guns and death is not glorious but futile and ultimately sad.
I don\'t know if this makes any sense but it\'s my view, thanks for reading if you did. My regards from Scotland.

| Posted on 2012-08-21 | by a guest


.: :.

Critical analysis is a tricky business. My students invariably profess their frustration (or illusory success) in searching for the \"hidden meaning\" in poems. The initial post on this site contains a kernel of critical truth, echoed by Frost when he was asked if his intent in writing \"Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening\" contained a death-metaphor in the refrain: \"The woods are lovely, dark and deep / But I have promises to keep / And miles to go before I sleep . . .\" In reply Frost said: \"What do YOU think it means?\" So how to we dig into \"The Hollow Men\"? There are some certainties; Eliot was an expatriot, believing that there could be no \"American\" poetry, since no tradition existed in America, no background of American literary works from which the poet could draw upon. William Carlos Williams denied Eliot\'s claim and proved him wrong, but that\'s another tale in itself. Eliot\'s philosophy is clearly demonstrated in \"The Hollow Men,\" as well as many of his other poems from \"Prufrock\" to \"Sweeny.\" Not only does he draw extensively from the Western Canon--all the way back to Homer--but also from Hindu texts. Eliot is known as an American poet, the ring of American Modernism we so richly enjoy from reading the poetry of Wallace Stevens and Williams is not there. By birth Eliot (and Pound) are American, but their poems are less American than the writings of James Joyce, their contemporary. For me, the allusion to \"hollowness\" rings of the displaced Eliot referred to in biographical references about his marriage, religious life, and his desperate attempts to become British, which included his speaking with an English accent in his later years. \"The Hollow Men\" is a complex masterpiece, about which volumes of criticism have been written. This comment should not be taken as a critical mini-essay, but a more concrete observation based on some historical / biographical facts that aren\'t open to analysis. Dr. J. Bennett Jasmin

| Posted on 2012-07-27 | by a guest


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Its about whatever YOU want it to be about. All of the above and less. What do you want it to be about?

| Posted on 2012-06-27 | by a guest


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This is a great poem that English learners really need to value.
TS Elliot wrote this poem during World War I and something that most comments dont say is that the poet himself is a hollow man.We can conclude this from the first line (\"WE are the hollow men).Even though it is not clearly said in the poem but a hollow man can be defined as a man who:
-has no vision/purpose in life
-lacks depth/substance or faith
-pursues material things
-prays blasphemous and corrupted prayer
-etc
However,it is critical to notice that TS Elliot does not judge hollow men. He does not refer to them as good or bad because hollow men are not \"extreme\". They are not necessarily bad people but they are not necessarily good either. If you think about it, most of us are hollow men( You dont have to believe it). An occasional act of goodness does not make you a goood person. The opposite is also very true. Hollow men are not \"violent souls\" but they are not perfect either.
I would like to bring your attention to Stanza3 (section1):/Shape without form,shade without colour.../
2 figures of speech are used here, both of which have a contadictory effect: Paradox (\"shape without form) as well as Oxymoron(\"paralysed force\"). This stanza embodies a very important idea for the poem and the figures of speech here are used to reflect the futility or uselessness of hollow men. It simply shows that hollow men half-exist just like a shape cannot exist without a form neither can there be a gesture without motion(I mean you cant lift your arm without moving it:try it... LOL)
Thanks for reading my comment! I hope it helps a great deal!
Ruthyy -17

| Posted on 2012-04-28 | by a guest


.: :.

This is a great poem that English learners really need to value.
TS Elliot wrote this poem during World War I and something that most comments dont say is that the poet himself is a hollow man.We can conclude this from the first line (\"WE are the hollow men).Even though it is not clearly said in the poem but a hollow man can be defined as a man who:
-has no vision/purpose in life
-lacks depth/substance or faith
-pursues material things
-prays blasphemous and corrupted prayer
-etc
However,it is critical to notice that TS Elliot does not judge hollow men. He does not refer to them as good or bad because hollow men are not \"extreme\". They are not necessarily bad people but they are not necessarily good either. If you think about it, most of us are hollow men( You dont have to believe it). An occasional act of goodness does not make you a goood person. The opposite is also very true. Hollow men are not \"violent souls\" but they are not perfect either.
I would like to bring your attention to Stanza3 (section1):/Shape without form,shade without colour.../
2 figures of speech are used here, both of which have a contadictory effect: Paradox (\"shape without form) as well as Oxymoron(\"paralysed force\"). This stanza embodies a very important idea for the poem and the figures of speech here are used to reflect the futility or uselessness of hollow men. It simply shows that hollow men half-exist just like a shape cannot exist without a form neither can there be a gesture without motion(I mean you cant lift your arm without moving it:try it... LOL)
Thanks for reading my comment! I hope it helps a great deal!
Ruthyy -17

| Posted on 2012-04-28 | by a guest


.: :.

it must be about the scheme between president bush, obama, osama, and the vietnam war. everything in the poem refers to these subjects!

| Posted on 2012-03-21 | by a guest


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Dear all,
I am trying to understand this poem for a literature exam.
Some of your comments were very helpful, many thanks. Here is what I know in return.
This poem can be seen as an extension to Eliots \"The Waste Land.\" it is about the aftermath of WW1 (not world war two, this poem was written in 1925!!!) and about the men who survived - the hollow men. They are full of traumatic experiences but feel hollow at the same time, like they have no purpose on earth. They wander. It is also about how the wester world changed after the war: the aftermath. The dead land, he writes, the cactus land. Life is almost barren, as a whole generation of young men has been wiped out. There is sadness and loneliness present in the poem, in the western world. There is no talking; the aftermath of the war casts a shadow between people, the shadow: something between life and death perhaps. The poem certainly feels like death, it is not glorious, the last lines of the poem remind one of the waste land again: the world will end, not with a (glorious, fulfilling, thrilling) bang, but with a (lousy, sad, speechless, powerless) whimper. I do hope this makes sense. Cheers from Scotland.

| Posted on 2012-01-08 | by a guest


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I feel like this poem could indeed be referencing the Great War, but I also see it as \"a test of faith\". Two years after this poem was published, Eliot converted religions. Maybe he was displaying the judgement the \"eyes\", or the church, put upon people who converted. The kingdom only opens its doors for certain people.
It is the epitome of the Modernist Movement, that society was fragile and broken. I recall one author saying in our era \"We all know God is dead\". Maybe this is what Eliot feared, or at least observed starting to occur.

| Posted on 2011-11-28 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem is about the survivors of World War 1. They are full of guilt and cant understand why they were the ones who were picked to live. They are \"Hollow Men\" because they have seen a lot and can\'t get over what happened. Knowing they can\'t change anything that happened. This poem is showing the feelings of the survivors.

| Posted on 2011-10-26 | by a guest


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Difficult to interpret ... but after reading it a couple of times and reading sdome of the other critiques, a few impressions have been made, whether correct or not. I see it as an appeal to the dead, probably of WWI, from those that survived. Most survivors feel guilty and have difficulty understand-ing why they survived - \"Remember us -- if at all -- , not as lost Violent souls, but only As the hollow men. The stuffed men\" - the military burial sites - \"crossed staves in a field\"; the abondoned spouses and lovers at gravesites: \"Lips that would kiss Form prayers to broken stone\"; the time of attack \"around\" the barbed wire - \"Here we go round the prickly pear
At five o\'clock in the morning.\"; the lives of those that have fallen from lust to ejaculation to pregnancy to birth to life to death - \"Between the desire And the spasm Between the potency And the existence Between the essence And the descent; and finally the uselessness of the deaths \"the wimper\". Perhaps too simplistic? I don\'t really know.

| Posted on 2011-08-01 | by a guest


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Lots of meanings in here. Lately I am obsessed with the shadow that falls between desire and creation, motion and act, etc. That shadow is full of dead projects, dreams and all what one wants to do, sometimes one knows that it is what has to be done, but still fails to accomplish. I am in the long bend of my forties now, probably the most shady decade of my life

| Posted on 2011-07-24 | by a guest


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We are the hollow men, we are the stuffed men. The first verses of the poem indicate a contradiction that surprises us. Hollow means “having a cavity within”, implying the idea of `emptiness´. It also has a figurative meaning, that of “lacking real value or significance”. Stuffed, however, means “filled by packing things in (to the point of overflowing)”. So now we appreciate the difference between the ideas of lack and abundance. But what do the hollow/stuffed men lack and what do they have in great quantities? If we look at line 4 (Headpiece filled with straw) we’ll notice the author highlights this part of the body as the one `stuffed´, and considering the headpiece as the representation of the mind, we’ll assume that these two verses have a symbolic, figurative meaning: the hollow men –who the speaker belongs to (We are)- are fulfilled with absurd, non-sense ideas and thoughts, causing them to be –in a contradiction in terms- empty and futile (let’s look back at the second meaning of hollow).

| Posted on 2011-06-27 | by a guest


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To the person who wrote this
"nobody is getting this right . . . its not deep at all, this is just a weird poem. i dont even think eliot knew what he was saying when he wrote this, pretty much anyone can write something using big words and call it poetry. look at The Red Wheelbarrow by William Carlos Williams, for example, the guy wrote about a wheelbarrow and chickens and its now a famous poem. i think im going to write a 3 line poem about my fingernail and try to publish it :) \\”
you’re not funny, and there is no ‘right’ interpretation of a poem. if you don’t see a deeper meaning then good for you, but other people who enjoy reading poetry might. just because your miniscule brain doesn’t understand symbolic meanins and can’t see past what’s written doesn’t mean that everyone else is as simple minded as you.

| Posted on 2011-06-12 | by a guest


.: :.

To the person who wrote this
\"nobody is getting this right . . . its not deep at all, this is just a weird poem. i dont even think eliot knew what he was saying when he wrote this, pretty much anyone can write something using big words and call it poetry. look at The Red Wheelbarrow by William Carlos Williams, for example, the guy wrote about a wheelbarrow and chickens and its now a famous poem. i think im going to write a 3 line poem about my fingernail and try to publish it :) \"
You clearly know nothing about the modernist period, or about Poetry at all! The metaphors used in this poetry, as well as the use of enjambment, and stream of consciousness are all techniques of modernist poetry. Now interpret the poem however you like, whether it be as biblical reference, WW1, The meaningless lives of the modernist society or any other way you see fit, which is part of the enjoyment of poetry is interpreting the language yourself, but never put someone else\'s poetry or works down. If you don\'t like it then don\'t read it, leave this a place for those who enjoy poetry and interpreting poetry to share their opinions. Thankyou!

| Posted on 2011-05-18 | by a guest


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{why does everyone keep calling it ww1?
it was the great war not ww1
dipshits}
To the person who wrote the above comment ^
I come from Australia, in our nation it is known as World War 1, There are different titles in different countries
Live a little, take your head out of your arse... your not the only person on the earth..

| Posted on 2011-05-14 | by a guest


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The story behind this poem is that his wife had been cheating on him and finally left him for another man. He was very deeply depressed at the time of this writing about life in general but hope springs eternal...a few months later he married his housekeeper. He was very happy with her sincere and simple caring for him, much like Einstein this great genius married a simpleminded, bighearted, caretaker, and was well cared for to the end of his life--this is true-- check it out!

| Posted on 2011-04-30 | by a guest


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I believe that with the advancement of weapons of mass destruction... the poem means so much more than that of faith.... I think that the meaning now points to the creators and users of methods of death.... heads of state, the CIA, etc. It\'s haunting... those quiet shadows... waiting... A great and predictive poem regarding the human race.

| Posted on 2011-03-15 | by a guest


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\"The Hollow Men\" is an extension on Eliot\'s \"The Waste Land\". Many of his other references have been listed above, but I feel that only one person on this thread actually got the meaning of this poem.
Eliot wrote this poem in 1925 (though it was published in parts, part 1, part 2, parts 3&4, and then the whole poem was published together with the added ending). Eliot had been an atheist, but in 1921 started visiting churches and joined the Church of England in 1927. This poem talks about a faith journey. Not necessarily the choice T.S. Eliot was making, but of thoughts he had had previously regarding living a life without faith, and the final destination of a person who lives such a life.
The poem begins referencing \"Heart of Darkness\" and Guy Fox Day. The first section is introducing the Hollow Men; men who are on their deathbed looking towards the afterlife, hollow because of their lack of faith but stuffed in their own self indulgent lifestyle. The next three sections are Heaven, Hell and Purgatory respectively.
The Hollow Men are considering their Godless lives and realizing that the most likely place for them would be purgatory, though none of the kingdoms of death truly appeal to them. Heaven to them would be riddled with guilt, as looking into the eyes of God would overwhelm them with that guilt. Hell is not an optimistic outcome for anyone; however they see it as their best choice as they are already living without God. Their lives that they have spend mulling over their options but never taking any action (like Prince Hamlet) is what they believe purgatory to be.
The repetition of the children’s songs suggests that the future of Christianity lies in the hands of children. The star (of Bethlehem) is fading and when the children have to belief, it will be out. Hence \"this is the way the world ends\". With children.
The recurring theme in the poem is doubt. The Hollow Men think over the prospect of faith and Christianity every day; however their doubt stands in their way. Between the ____ and the ___ falls the shadow. The hollow men like the idea of God, but their reality is without him because of the shadow of doubt coming between them and God. This is continued until the end of the poem.
“For Thine is the kingdom” references the end of the Lords prayer suggesting that the end of the poem parallels the end of Christianity.

| Posted on 2011-03-10 | by a guest


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The empty, pointless bodies, the \"hollow men\" wander the earth desperately \"groping together\" to avoid death. But what they don\'t realize is death is not something outside of the earth, but life as we know it is in fact everything we try so achingly to avoid as we pass the time in \"death\'s other kingdom.\"
The second to last stanza we, the readers stumble and grasp to hold on, explaining it as we thought we could before, \"thine is...\" until we finally understand, and make it truth. Convince ourselves of the new truth by saying it 3 times. Because as long as we can hold onto something, new or old. We live, we live to avoid death.
Interpretations are open. It no longer belongs to Elliot due to the fact that you read it. No interpretations are incorrect as long as you use the present elements. That said, great work is work in which the difference between what the author wanted to say and the reader understood is minimal.

| Posted on 2011-03-08 | by a guest


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why does everyone keep calling it ww1?
it was the great war not ww1
dipshits

| Posted on 2011-02-28 | by a guest


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In this poem, Eliot\'s deep sense of utter despair and conviction of the human race\'s worthlessness is achingly apparent. He implies that it would not be justly harsh if the humans at that time were remembered as anything more than scarecrows: \"Remember us - if at all - not as lost violent souls, but only as the Hollow men, The stuffed men\" etc etc... His emotions, and interpretations of the world around him seem to climax towards the end of the poem, where strangled prayer and deranged nursery rhymes leave a sense of despairing frenzy.. finaly, his lines crumble, and all that is left is a repetitive: \"this is the way the world ens, this is the way the world ends, this is the way the world ends, not with a bang but a whimper\" sophie rose, 13

| Posted on 2011-01-30 | by a guest


.: :.

In this poem, Eliot\'s deep sense of utter despair and conviction of the human race\'s worthlessness is achingly apparent. He implies that it would not be justly harsh if the humans at that time were remembered as anything more than scarecrows: \"Remember us - if at all - not as lost violent souls, but only as the Hollow men, The stuffed men\" etc etc... His emotions, and interpretations of the world around him seem to climax towards the end of the poem, where strangled prayer and deranged nursery rhymes leave a sense of despairing frenzy.. finaly, his lines crumble, and all that is left is a repetitive: \"this is the way the world ens, this is the way the world ends, this is the way the world ends, not with a bang but a whimper\" sophie rose, 13

| Posted on 2011-01-29 | by a guest


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I dislike most modern poetry. I dislike all poetry that does not clearly say something.

| Posted on 2011-01-26 | by a guest


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Without knowing anything about Elliot\'s particular circumstances--the themes I am most vividly left with are those of impermanence and mediocrity, and the interplay of these. It reminds me of Ecclesiastes:
\"Vanity of vanities, saith the Preacher, vanity of vanities; all is vanity.
What profit hath a man of all his labour which he taketh under the sun?
One generation passeth away, and another generation cometh\"
Things never end well, our ephemeral existence sets the stage for all else to be (in many ways) doomed from the start, and therefore is robbed of a certain degree of significance and vitality.
Its not just a lifetime that ends disappointingly, or \"with a whimper,\" its the countless acts that come along the way.
\"Between the idea
And the reality
Between the motion
And the act
Falls the Shadow\"
He goes on like this for some time.
It seems to me he is referencing something lost, an ideal unfulfilled. The fact that he calls it \"the shadow\" indicates that inevitable death is intrinsically tied to the inability to fully and gloriously carry something out.
The hollow men are constantly fearing their own death, yet they are never really alive. Perhaps they are robbed of substantial existences only BECAUSE they spend them afraid of their finite nature, I\'m not sure.

| Posted on 2011-01-13 | by a guest


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The poem is about how living people are meaningless.
\"Our dried voices, when We whisper together Are quiet and meaningless As wind in dry grass or rats\' feet over broken glass In our dry cellar.\"
Yet, the dead will remember us as something BUT nothing, simply there.
\"Those who have crossed With direct eyes, to death\'s other Kingdom Remember us -- if at all -- not as lost
Violent souls, but only As the hollow men The stuffed men.\"
There is no indication that the dead have become more aware or powerful than living, notice the --if at all-- part, it is simply a third person view of living people.
Another point that living people have no hope in life, no real permanent prospect to look forward to, except death. Maybe to another existence, as men fear to be forgotten.
\"Of death\'s twilight kingdom The hope only Of empty men.\"
Also showing that men fear the unknown of death and the process of passing through is a lonely, desolate one
\"In death\'s other kingdom Waking alone At the hour when we are Trembling with tenderness\"
And of course, the infamous ending, stating that we simply fade from existence, we were never truly anything, and once we are gone we never will be anything.
\"This is the way the world ends This is the way the world ends This is the way the world ends Not with a bang but a whimper.\"

| Posted on 2010-12-11 | by a guest


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The horror experienced by this poem has to do with the discomfort we feel at the notion that we can\'t even rely on the idea of a monumental and dramatic exit from the world. This runs contrary to disaster epic films that Hollywood offers with bang up finishes. Even if we are facing destruction, at least we\'ll go out with a bang- this poem, and the film On the Beach (1959) present the opposite outcome.
Ultimately, the majority of human deaths are monumental whimpers- and that is truly terrifying. This is also linked to the fear of being forgotten once one dies. In Toni Morrison\'s Beloved, one can\'t forget the haunting description of how Beloved simply disappears, never to be remembered. Again, non-existence is by far more fearful to humans than a tortured existence.

| Posted on 2010-07-30 | by a guest


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Advice from one who has taught this poem-read it aloud three times and try to sing it once (especially the prickly-pear variation on the mulberry-bush). Eliot uses language like a jazz-musician, not surprising for a poet of the 20's. He greatly admired J. Conrad's Heart of Darkness and recognized in the tragic fate of "Mistah Kurtz" or the violent end of the Ol' Guy (Guy Fawkes Day-the English cross between Halloween and the 4th of July) the alternative to his own lost generation, stripped of their rags and tatters of faith by the blasts of World War I. Like spiritual scarecrows with their staves and disguises, his fellow hollowmen live in a purgatory with lifeless stone images where prayers are only mumbled words empty of meaning. Between the allsuions (fixed) and the feelings (personal) come the meanings (fluid). When pain awakes you at 3 o'clock you can pray or write a poem-both ultimately will go unanswered in a world that shares only its silence.

| Posted on 2010-07-19 | by a guest


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I found this poem to be very interesting to me. Several times it referenced the story "Sir Seven and the Big Worm"

| Posted on 2010-05-17 | by a guest


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Verse V is all about the shadow of death descending upon the world. "Here we go round the prickley pear" parallels the old children's game "Here we go round the mulbury bush" with it's "ashes to ashes, we all fall down"--a clear reference to the bubonic plague of the fourteenth century that wiped out two-thirds of European population. Interestingly, WWI destroyed an entire generation of European young men, not to mention civilian casualaties--all brought on by the crazy, rationalistic war mongerers.

| Posted on 2010-05-05 | by a guest


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I'd like to make a correction to the 2010-05-03's post. This poem is a reflection on WWI not II. Written in 1925 Eliot didn't even know that WWII was going to be taking place. For more incite on this poem I would direct one to the following website: x

| Posted on 2010-05-05 | by a guest


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This poem may be referencing WW2 but if anyone was willing to do a smidgen of research they would soon find out that not only does this poem reference Shakespeare, the obvious Joseph Conrad, Dante's inferno, Plato, and in one line God; one might see that a major portion of the poem is referencing the Gunpowder Plot on November 5. In 1605, a band of men planned to kill King James I by blowing up Parliament. The man selected to light the fuse was Guy Fawkes. The plan ultimately failed and Guy Fawkes was hanged. But in England today, on November 5 huge bonfires are lit and straw-filled effigies of Fawkes are placed in the fire ("stuffed men"). Also, children carry a "guy" and pretend to be beggars asking for "a penny for the guy" to buy fireworks. This reference has an effect of emphasizing the theme of this poem which is humanity's loss of will and faith. So not really referencing to trench warfare...so i think you're the idiot

| Posted on 2010-05-03 | by a guest


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Dear Sweetheart,
I found this great poetry analysis site that we can use to find some great information on our favorite poems. I wish we could be with each other, but my mom insists I go to college. We can still Skype on the weekends, just make sure your parents aren't home.
Love you,
Stephanie

| Posted on 2010-05-03 | by a guest


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TS Eliot was a very nice man, you should not disrespect him, this poem is very deep and can be applied to our era today. I feel as if a main proponent of someone who has emobodied the mind and spirit of TS Eliot is Ms Tanaka, my own honors english teacher, shout out to ms tanaka's class and students ! wooot wooot!

| Posted on 2010-05-03 | by a guest


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I think the poem refers to men whose value system has been shot to hell by the destruction and dislocations brought on by technological developments in the early Modern Era. the men hope to be remembered not as "violent souls" but as "hollow men," i.e., men whose heads are stuffed with straw--a meterial that has little value and blows in the wind. The poet laments that sunlight cannot illuminate the classical teachings, represented by the broken columns--nothing is left but a cultural desert, a "cactus land." Religion, the main unifying force in Western culture for almost two thousand years, offers no hope. The end is near. Yes, the poet makes a number of references to other literary works, but that is not the subject. The problem in reading this is that most students have no experience reading allegories and even fewer have had a classical education.

| Posted on 2010-05-02 | by a guest


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the Hollow Men is comprised of lines that were edited out out of Eliot's famous poem, The Wateland. Eliot then used the lines edited out and rearranged them in a way that fit. Throughout the poem, Eliot makes references to multiple other works such as Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness, and Dante's Divine Comedy as well as Shakespeare's Julius Caesar. He also makes ref to the Gunpowder Plot and the hanging of Guy Fawkes.

| Posted on 2010-05-02 | by a guest


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This is a post world war 2 poem talking about the powerlessness of man during that time wiht the draft etc.

| Posted on 2010-04-23 | by a guest


.: :.

Elliot wrote this as a castigating whip to those who walk past the veterans who came back as ragged,despairing and crippled men with no future in a country that was trying to do without them. They are the castaways, the useless, the burdens that come with every conflict that we try to put behind us.

| Posted on 2010-04-14 | by a guest


.: :.

I'll admit that I don't understand the poem; but I still like the way it's written. :D
My favourite part is the last few lines... now that is some pretty deep stuff. I love it.
To those those idiots commenting that this is stupid:
Stfu and gtfo. Nobody likes you. You need some random person on the internet to give you the answers? You obviously aren't very bright, and you'll probably fail English anyway, so go crawl into the hole you probably call home and continue to live your pathetic life in obscurity.
People like you are annoying. Save your idiocy for someone else who gives a damn.

| Posted on 2010-03-23 | by a guest


.: :.

In this poem, the Poet T.S Eliot tells about the emptiness ad hollowness of modern Men. Poet says that modern men lacks many things including true emotions and ambitions.

| Posted on 2010-03-23 | by a guest




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