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Tears, Idle Tears Analysis



Author: poem of Alfred Lord Tennyson Type: poem Views: 27

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Tears, idle tears, I know not what they mean,

Tears from the depth of some divine despair

Rise in the heart, and gather to the eyes,

In looking on the happy autumn-fields,

And thinking of the days that are no more.



    Fresh as the first beam glittering on a sail,

That brings our friends up from the underworld,

Sad as the last which reddens over one

That sinks with all we love below the verge;

So sad, so fresh, the days that are no more.



    Ah, sad and strange as in dark summer dawns

The earliest pipe of half-awakened birds

To dying ears, when unto dying eyes

The casement slowly grows a glimmering square;

So sad, so strange, the days that are no more.



    Dear as remembered kisses after death,

And sweet as those by hopeless fancy feigned

On lips that are for others; deep as love,

Deep as first love, and wild with all regret;

O Death in Life, the days that are no more!





Submitted by Venus






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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

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A regret for the old days, events and lovely people who are now out of reach, The poet shares his memory of them with those who read his work.

| Posted on 2012-05-13 | by a guest


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This poem is a blank verse because it unrhymed iambic pentameter. It is a 4 stanza quintet.“Tears, Idle Tears” is structured by a pattern of unusual adjectives used to describe the memory of the past. In the second stanza, these adjectives are a chiastic x the memory of the birth of friendship is “fresh,” whereas the loss of these friends is “sad”; thus when the “days that are no more” are described as both “sad” and “fresh,” these words have been preemptively loaded with meaning and connotation: our sense of the “sad” and “fresh” past evokes these blossomed and withered friendships. This stanza’s image of the boat sailing to and from the underworld recalls Virgil’s image of the boatman Charon, who ferries the dead to Hades.
In the third stanza, the memory of the past is described as x The “sad” adjective is introduced in the image of a man on his deathbed who is awake for his very last morning. However, “strangeness” enters in, too, for it is strange to the dying man that as his life is ending, a new day is beginning. To a person hearing the birds’ song and knowing he will never hear it again, the twittering will be imbued with an unprecedented significance—the dying man will hear certain melancholy tones for the first time, although, strangely and paradoxically, it is his last.
The final stanza contains a wave of adjectives that rush over us—now no longer confined within a neat chiasmic structure—as the poem reaches its last, climactic lament: x The repetition of the word “deep” recalls the “depth of some divine despair,” which is the source of the tears in the first stanza. However, the speaker is also “wild with all regret” in thinking of the irreclaimable days gone by. The image of a “Death in Life” recalls the dead friends of the second stanza who are like submerged memories that rise to the surface only to sink down once again. This “Death in Life” also recalls the experience of dying in the midst of the rebirth of life in the morning, described in the third stanza. The poet’s climactic exclamation in the final line thus represents a culmination of the images developed in the previous stanzas.

| Posted on 2010-11-03 | by a guest


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written in 1847 by Alfred, Lord Tennyson the poem is unrhymed the poem's blank verse the poem does not rhyme.Blank verse is a type of poetry, distinguished by having a regular meter, but no rhyme. In English, the meter most commonly used with blank verse has been iambic pentameter

| Posted on 2009-12-11 | by a guest


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i Need to know the analysis on this poetry.
thank you

| Posted on 2009-10-14 | by a guest


.: :.

i Need to know the analysis on this poetry.
thank you

| Posted on 2009-10-14 | by a guest


.: :.

A paradoxical poem creating ambiguous beauty. The speaker is reflecting on "days that are no more" -- which brings upon sadness and grief. The "idle" tears from the "depths of some divine despair" stem from "happy" times gone by.

| Posted on 2009-10-06 | by a guest




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