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There Is A Garden In Her Face Analysis



Author: Poetry of Thomas Campion Type: Poetry Views: 1748

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1There is a garden in her face

2Where roses and white lilies grow;

3A heav'nly paradise is that place

4Wherein all pleasant fruits do flow.

5There cherries grow which none may buy,

6Till "Cherry ripe" themselves do cry.



7Those cherries fairly do enclose

8Of orient pearl a double row,

9Which when her lovely laughter shows,

10They look like rose-buds fill'd with snow;

11Yet them nor peer nor prince can buy,

12Till "Cherry ripe" themselves do cry.



13Her eyes like angels watch them still,

14Her brows like bended bows do stand,

15Threat'ning with piercing frowns to kill

16All that attempt with eye or hand

17Those sacred cherries to come nigh,

18Till "Cherry ripe" themselves do cry.





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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

Can't we say that, the reaon why the speaker says that, "Yet them nor peer nor prince can buy", is because she is ugly??
That's why every stanza has this line "Till 'Cherry ripe' themselves do cry."
'Cause she's crying 'cause she's ugly...
And the speaker says that the face is a garden 'cause there are roses, which is pimples, and the cherries which is the reddish cheeks ..etc.
It's just what I think when I read the poem...
But maybe, it's not the meaning of the poem.. :)

| Posted on 2014-10-13 | by a guest


.: :.

This is a lyric poem with three six-line stanzas. The speaker admires the face of young girl by comparing with garden.

| Posted on 2014-04-29 | by a guest


.: :.

To break it down simply for people who don't get the general idea of this poem; theres an interesting juxtaposition here with the symbolic use of the Garden (purity) and the act of being willing to be "rip enough for the picking" ("Till cherry ripe").
A Major theme here is maintaining purity until a woman decides a man's love is genuine enough to give it up to him.
Guys, this poem is about sex. This dude wants this chick, but realizes she's not a tramp. He see's this and basically thinks "damn..she's so beautiful. She's like a well kept-garden, 'cept I can't 'pick her fruits' until she at least brings me within the confines of the friendzone."
make sense in plain colloquial english?

| Posted on 2014-02-03 | by a guest


.: :.

To break it down simply for people who don't get the general idea of this poem; theres an interesting juxtaposition here with the symbolic use of the Garden (purity) and the act of being willing to be "rip enough for the picking" ("Till cherry ripe").
A Major theme here is maintaining purity until a woman decides a man's love is genuine enough to give it up to him.
Guys, this poem is about sex. This dude wants to bang this chick, but realizes she's not a tramp. He see's this and basically thinks "damn..she's so beautiful. She's like a well kept-garden, 'cept I can't 'pick her fruits' until she at least brings me within the confines of the friendzone."
make sense in plain colloquial english?

| Posted on 2014-02-03 | by a guest


.: :.

Campion uses metaphors and similes to compare the lady to the splendors of nature. Roses and cherries are repeatedly used to describe various parts of the lady, like her rosy cheeks and luscious lips. Her teeth are said to be made \"of orient pearl a double row\" . The white of the pearl, the lilies and the snow build the image of a woman of purity and good quality. This perception of the lady as a divine creature is emphasized by the many references to heaven. Her face is seen as \"a heavenly paradise\", her eyes are \"like angels\", and her lips are called \"sacred cherries\". They are a forbidden fruit, similar to those of the Garden of Eden, that no one may touch or even look at \"till \'Cherry ripe!\' themselves do cry\". The lady is viewed to be unapproachable unless she gives her permission to be approached. She seems cold and unfeeling when her brows are described as \"bended bows\" ready to kill with \"piercing frowns\", so it is likely that she does not give her permission easily. This woman cannot possibly be as godlike and perfect as the speaker makes her out to be, which causes this poem to feel strained and false.
The false admiration in this poem shows the reader that society has a specific idea of beauty which is impossible for any woman or man to match. Campion\'s poem reflects this impossible ideal that society inflicts on us. This woman in There is a Garden in Her Face could never really live up to the image that the speaker has created of her. The image is false, and so is his love because he is only focusing on her outward appearance.

| Posted on 2012-11-23 | by a guest


.: :.

this girl is extremely beautiful yet she would not just go with anybody. She is unsullied.

| Posted on 2012-11-18 | by a guest


.: :.

this poem talks about the author\'s admiration or appreciation for the beauty and virginity of his lady-love.. which is also compared to natures beauty.. like nature, virginity is the first step.. but later on spoils it\'s beauty..

| Posted on 2011-10-06 | by a guest


.: :.

i think its all about the beauty and purity of a woman wherein they used a beautiful garden to describe her..she is sometimes a bad/ugly girl/garden if she got mad until no one likes her becoz of this attitude

| Posted on 2011-10-05 | by a guest


.: :.

In this poem, Campion used many similes and metaphors to decribe the beautiful girl in his mind. To start with, \"there is a garden in her face\" indicates that there is a sustained beauty in her. Also, the visual image of the Garden shows that she will be radiant and cheerful.
The 2nd stanza suggests that there is a perfect beauty of the girl like the Garden of Eden(the heavenly paradise). Moreover, it shows that the girl is pure and sinless. The virginity is sacred, not to be made unholy, not to be touch and not to be defiled.

| Posted on 2011-01-13 | by a guest


.: :.

-these is my project too, please help me to analyze these poem so i can get better grade for my subject. thanks a lot to those who help.

| Posted on 2010-09-22 | by a guest


.: :.

The poet in this poem describes a very beautiful girl’s face. The poet tries to make a comparison between her face and the garden when he says: “there is a garden in her face”.
First, he mentions that her face has a garden and he starts counting many nice roses and the most beautiful fruit color “cherry”, that appears in the first 7lines.
Second, the poet describes the checks and laugh and make them a orient, when he says: “Of orient pearl a double row, Which when her lovely laughter shows, They look like rose-buds filled with snow;”
After that the poet moves to say that the people around her wants to get some of her beauty and specially the nobles and princes, when he says: “ Yet them nor peer nor prince can buy,”.
At the end the poet concludes by describing her eyes and brows and her beauty and power, when he says: “Her eyes like angels watch them still, Her brows like bended bows do stand, Threatening with piercing frowns to kill” (I think that her angel eyes with her brows that threatening everyone looks at them are like cupid(angel= her eyes) who has an arrow(her eyebrows) threatening everyone looks at them by falling in love with them”.
You have a lot of figurative of speech:
1. Simile:” like” in the 4s line in the 2 stanza. The1/2line in the 3d stanza.
2. Metaphor: “ there is a garden in her face” the garden and the girl’s face: x “Till "Cherry ripe" themselves do cry.”…. “Threatening with piercing frowns to kill”
4. Imagery: in all the poem to use your eyes to see what the poet describes, such as “there is a garden in her face”.

| Posted on 2010-05-24 | by a guest


.: :.

I'm pretty sure hes eluding to pedophilia when he speaks about Cherry Ripe.

| Posted on 2010-05-03 | by a guest


.: :.

PLEase give meaning of each number lines in this poet.i have a report to do PLEASE!

| Posted on 2009-08-10 | by a guest


.: :.

*basically* it's about a guy who wants to kiss a girl, but she keeps saying no.
it is from the p.o.v of a 15th century guy, who mainly focuses on her face

| Posted on 2009-02-14 | by a guest


.: :.

'Cherry ripe!' was a London street-cry; women would hawk cherries through the streets and cry 'Cherry ripe!' The interest of the poem lies first in the way the woman's face is overlaid with the Garden of Eden, and second in the humorous (and slightly blasphemous) juxtaposition of the street cry with the sacred garden. The emotion in the poem lies in the tone of wonder with which the speaker attempts to describe the woman's beauty, comparing to Eden. The poem is surely not 'impersonal' at all. Speak the poem and see how the 'ar' of garden seems to open up a space (if you are sensitive to synaesthetic effects, of which Campion was a master). The woman is surely not jealously guarding her virginity: the point of the poem is that she will not go with just anybody - even if he is a prince - until she herself chooses her lover (and she might have had a number of lovers before this). In the context of the poem, 'Cherry ripe!' means 'I am ready to kiss you' (and perhaps more than kiss). And the poem has definitely nothing to do with Queen Elizabeth I.

| Posted on 2008-04-19 | by a guest


.: :.

'Cherry ripe!' was a London street-cry; women would hawk cherries through the streets and cry 'Cherry ripe!' The interest of the poem lies first in the way the woman's face is overlaid with the Garden of Eden, and second in the humorous (and slightly blasphemous) juxtaposition of the street cry with the sacred garden. The emotion in the poem lies in the tone of wonder with which the speaker attempts to describe the woman's beauty, comparing to Eden. The poem is surely not 'impersonal' at all. Speak the poem and see how the 'ar' of garden seems to open up a space (if you are sensitive to synaesthetic effects, of which Campion was a master). The woman is surely not jealously guarding her virginity: the point of the poem is that she will not go with just anybody - even if he is a prince - until she herself chooses her lover (and she might have had a number of lovers before this). In the context of the poem, 'Cherry ripe!' means 'I am ready to kiss you' (and perhaps more than kiss). And the poem has definitely nothing to do with Queen Elizabeth I.

| Posted on 2008-04-19 | by a guest


.: (From an EngLit Teacher) :.

In this poem, Campion describes a girl. But it is much more than that. He uses very universal colour imagery (a poem made to be interpreted by others). White is the universal colour of purity and virginity! (Also linked to the significance of the lily) This is an attribute that he seems to praise in the girl. At that time, an unmarried woman who was not a virgin would consider herself "spoiled" so virginity was an asset. Red is the colour of love and passion. But we can note that she will not allow anyone the "cherry" (hint hint) till it is "ripe" or ready. And she decides. Line 13 reminds me of an intertextual link to the Garden of Eden (the significance here is the fall of man through Eve's tasting of the forbidden fruit) and the angels that guard the gates after Adam and Eve are put out of the garden. the object of Campion's poem, this girl, guards her paradise, her own garden her ahem... "cherry" (virginity) as well! She is, it seems, an extra-ordinary woman (and her physical characteristics are only used as metaphors for her deeper more valuable assets). We can see this from his likening her teeth to a very valuable stone of the time: the pearl (which in itself also has Biblical connotations) The symbolism of the rose bud is also important. The rose is the symbol of feminity (because of it's similarity to a certain part of female anatomy) and in this poem, because the rose is featured in bud and not bloom, it gives a sense that this is a girl who is on the threshold of womanhood but not quite in "full bloom" and so, at that age, when she is all virgin and virtue and innocence, she is extra-ordinarily special.

| Posted on 2007-07-01 | by a guest


.: :.

i dont understand the meaning of this poem, i am trying to get a deeper meaning out of the physical links to material objects explained here by Campion. what does he mean by 'till cherry ripe themselves do cry'? is this some form of emotion he is expressing through the poem?


| Posted on 2007-05-12 | by a guest


.: :.

This is a courtly blazon, it is an inpersonal poem from the Elizabethan era. It's nature of purity and symbolic physical description is in direct relation with the way Queen Elizabeth set herself up. It is also lyrical, the repetitve last line indicates that it is actually lyrical or song verse.

| Posted on 2007-03-27 | by a guest


.: :.

I think that seven rhymes with heaven. ???

Anyways, the point is that this is a blazon. It describes the physical attributes of this random girl. Now the thing about a blazon is that it can never be too personalized because it only describes physical appearance (hair, skin, eyes etc etc).

The rhyme scheme is IN-TER-ES-TING.

A
B
A
B
C
C

hes trying to be unique with this rhyme scheme.. but actually hes just copying every one else's blazons. (hes trying too hard is where im getting at).


I see a bird! G2G!

| Posted on 2006-02-07 | by Approved Guest


.: :.

i have no idea so please help. this is not an analysis but i really need help. please someone write one so i can understand what this poem means. i have no idea so please do something. stop making me write in this box. why do i need to add more? huh? just post this thing. stop telling me that this should be longer and that i should work towards an analysis instead of a review. im not even writing an analysis. please submit this now. im running out of patients to keep typing gibberish.

| Posted on 2005-09-11 | by Approved Guest




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