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Dulce et Decorum Est Analysis



Author: Poetry of Wilfred Owen Type: Poetry Views: 5443





1 Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,

2 Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,

3 Till on the haunting flares we turned out backs,

4 And towards our distant rest began to trudge.

5 Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots,

6 But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame, all blind;

7 Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots

8 Of gas-shells dropping softly behind.



9 Gas! GAS! Quick, boys!--An ecstasy of fumbling

10 Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time,

11 But someone still was yelling out and stumbling

12 And flound'ring like a man in fire or lime.--

13 Dim through the misty panes and thick green light,

14 As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.



15 In all my dreams before my helpless sight

16 He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.



17 If in some smothering dreams, you too could pace

18 Behind the wagon that we flung him in,

19 And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,

20 His hanging face, like a devil's sick of sin,

21 If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood

22 Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs

23 Bitter as the cud

24 Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,--

25 My friend, you would not tell with such high zest

26 To children ardent for some desperate glory,

27 The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est

28 Pro patria mori.





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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

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has anyone got an essay about drunk with fatigue using peels paragraphs need help xxx

| Posted on 2013-11-10 | by a guest


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A theme of claustrophobia is continued throughout the poem, as the water rises, and the rain comes down, and the \'misty panes\' of the gas helmet trap the narrator as another man is \'drowning\'

| Posted on 2013-02-05 | by a guest


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Wilfred Owen was born on March 18, 1893. He is considered to be one of the leading WWI poets. He served in the British army during WWI. His family lived comfortably in Owen\'s grandfather\'s house until he died in 1897, then the family had to move to the poorer part of Birkenhead. He went to Birkenhead Institute and Shrewsbury Technical School. He began writing poetry when he around ten years old, and continued to write until his death. He was raised in the Anglican church of the evangelical school; he was a devout believer in his youth. He was admitted into the University of London in 1911, but due to his family\'s financial struggles he had to work as the lay assistant to the Vicar of Dunsden as a pupil-teacher at Wyle Cop School for free lodging and some tuition. During his time at Dunsden parish that he became disenchanted with his religion. He was working as a private tutor at the Berlitz School of Languages in Bordeaux, France when WWI broke out. On October 21, 1915, he enlisted in the Artists\' Rifles Offiers\' Training Corps. On June 4, 1916 he was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Manchester Regiment. Owen began the war optimistically, but after two traumatic events his mindset changed. First, he was blown high into the air by a trench mortar and landed in the remains of a fellow officer. Second, he was trapped in an old German dugout for days. He was diagnosed with shell shock and sent to the Craiglockhart War Hospital in Edinburgh. It was here that he met Siegfried Sassoon. Sassoon had a huge impact on Owen\'s life and poetry. Owen\'s poetry became dark as he portrayed the horrors of the front line as realistically as he could. His poetry went against the public perception of the war at that time; it helped to open the eyes of the non-militant people back home. He returned to light regimental duties in March of 1918 at the Northern Command Depot at Ripon. He wrote a number of poems while he was in Ripon, the most notable are \"Futility\" and \"Strange Meeting.\" He returned to the front line on October 1, 1918, and led the Second Manchester. While he was trying to cross a canal, he was shot in the head and died. WWI ended one week later. He was later awarded the Military Cross, which for him validated him as a war poet.

| Posted on 2012-12-17 | by a guest


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I think that Wilfred Owen is amazing but I wanted to know where or if he used assonance in this poem????

| Posted on 2012-10-04 | by a guest


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Set your own life more simple take the home loans and all you require.

| Posted on 2012-05-17 | by a guest


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Very helpful. it\'s good to see that the poems of Wilfred Owen still inspire nearly 100 years after the slaughter. As for the idiot who \'rolled on the floor laughing\' at the death just be thankful that men fought and died so that morons like you would have the freedom to make asinine comments.

| Posted on 2012-05-14 | by a guest


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Not to be a jerk, who I am obviously going to be perceived as, some people have shared essays that they are doing for college or high school. A friend and I are splitting a ten page paper 50/50 on this subject. Were in 6th grade. For those who seem to be out of college, your points are amazing and I share some of the same ones myself.

| Posted on 2012-05-12 | by a guest


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fyi line 23 is
\"Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud\"

| Posted on 2012-03-24 | by a guest


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The whole poem is an oxymoron. We have the fumbling with ectasy when he was fumbling in pain to save his life as a lne but the title is in stark contrast to the content as a whole.
The poem isalso sexist which was acceptable at the time. The poem refers to men being like \"hags\" so they were no longer men, or even old men but old women. Perhaps Owen was a mesogynist, maybe it was because the women reviled those who didn\'t go, were safely away from the oscenity of death and injury.
I don\'t think this is cheating, you might get your teacher\'s opinion and that isn\'t cheating. This way you get a variety of opinions which you are free to agree with or not.

| Posted on 2012-03-10 | by a guest


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THIS HELPED ME SO MUCH, THANKYOU! it has to be said though- wilfred owen was an amazing poet!

| Posted on 2012-02-23 | by a guest


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The poem that I have studied that has an interesting title is \'Dulce et Decorum Est\' by Wilfred Owen. This poem condemns those who glorified the war and tempted young men to join the army with heroic rhetoric. It contrasts the idealistic views that were held about war at the time with the harsh reality of those who fought in the front lines.

The title of this poem is interesting because it is in Latin. The minute I saw the title I wondered what it meant. It prompted me to read the poem in full. I also thought the poem was interesting because the poet spends the entire poem disproving what the title says. The title comes from the phrase, \"Dulce et decorum est/Pro patria mori.\" This phrase translated into English means sweet and honourable it is to die for one\'s country.
Owen fought in the war and saw the horrors of it. His aim was to show that it was far from sweet to die for one\'s country. This is interesting because poets usually use a title to reinforce the theme of the poem. Stanzas two and three present us with the harrowing reality of a soldier dying. We see the panic and the indignity of his death as he is \"choking\" and \"guttering\". There is nothing \"sweet\" or \"honourable\" about his death as they fling his body in a cart.

The entire poem does much to undermine the title of the poem and this is why I find it interesting.


There are may other features of \'Dulce et Decorum Est\' that appeal to me. One of the most effective features of the poem is the poet\'s use of onomatopoeia. This sound effect is used in order to create a sense of war more vividly. We are told that the soldiers \"trudge\" towards the camp. This word suggests how tired the soldiers are.

The sounds of the battlefield are conveyed through the word \"hoots\". However, the onomatopoeic words used to describe the choking man are the most poignant and hard-hitting. The line portrays the panic of the man and the sound of him dying, \"He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.\"

Another feature of the poem that appealed to me was the strong imagery. The poem opens with two effective similes that create a clear picture of the soldiers. The image of the soldiers being tired and overburdened is conveyed well by the simile, \"like old beggars under sacks\". The unhealthy condition of the soldiers is portrayed by the image of them, \"coughing like hags\".

In the second stanza, the picture of the unfortunate man who is choking is clearly conveyed. The man is running about \"like a man in fire and lime\". The green gas is compared to a \"green sea\" and the man is described as dying.
These images and many more made this piece a very thought provoking poem. I thought it was one of the best poems I have ever studied.

| Posted on 2012-02-19 | by a guest


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the peom that i have studied is dulce et decorum est by wilfre owen.I thought this poem was a particularly interesting comment on war because its author both fought and died in the war. Owen was killed tragically in action just a week before the war ended.
The poem condemns those who glorified the war and tempted young men to enlist with heroic rhetoric. It contrasts the idealistic views that were held about war with the harsh reality of those who actually fought in the front lines.
Owen uses much of this poem to create a vivid picture of how awful the war was and to show the fiercely detrimental effect it had on the soldiers. The first stanza conveys a picture of exhausted, overburdened and injured men. The soldiers are “Drunk with fatigue”, many are without boots but are forced to limp on. The sounds of the battlefield are brilliantly conveyed through Owen’s alliteration and onomatopoeia.
Owen describes seeing a man “choking” to death during a poisonous gas raid. The picture of him “drowning” is haunting and very disturbing. He shows the awful indignity of death as the man was “flung” in a wagon as they marched on to their next destination.
The poet shows the lasting effect of the war on the soldiers who witnessed these deaths. They may have survived but the horrific memories lasted in their “smothering dreams”.
In the final lines of the poem, Owen utterly rejects the “old Lie” that it is sweet and honourable to die for one’s country. This poem is a brilliant condemnation of war.

The poem had a profound effect on me. I had read about and studied World War One in history class but had never really thought about its effects on ordinary people. The fact that Owen himself died in the war at the age of twenty-five made the poem all the more real for me.
The poet’s great use of language created really vivid pictures of the soldiers. I could see the poor men “Bent double, like old beggars under sacks”. The repetition of the word “all” showed me that the suffering in the war was universal; that every soldier endured pain. I could not imagine having to go through such horror.
Owen’s poem made me feel like I was one of the bystanders when that poor soldier was choked to death by poisonous gas. I could imagine the man in a “green sea” calling out for help as he is dying and how “helpless” I would have felt. This image will stay with me a long time after this examination or the next.
I felt so sorry for the dead man literally being “flung” in a wagon instead of getting the hero’s burial that he deserved. I also realised from this poem that the scars of war reach far beyond the war itself. It is obvious that Owen could not erase the picture of this dying man from his mind and would revisit this time in his “smothering dreams”.
This poem made me realise just how difficult things were for the soldiers in World War One and made me realise how lucky I am to have never experienced a war.

| Posted on 2012-02-19 | by a guest


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Thank you to all of those who took the time to write such wonderful analysis. T his has really helped me, Thank you very much. :)

| Posted on 2012-01-12 | by a guest


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Thnx, peeps a lot for dis hlped me a lot on the analysis of dulce et decorum est and i got a 6a yayyy

| Posted on 2011-12-15 | by a guest


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I am preparing an exam on Modern English POetry....tis is one of my essays, please don\'t hesitate to add your comments, whether pro or contra.
Dulce et Decorum Est.
In this relatively short poem, the poet clearly expresses his attitude against the war. In this part it will be discussed about the meaning of the poems title, type of work, setting, characters and other important elements that help us decipher this poem, to make it more acceptable for the masses.
As the title suggests, which indeed is a sample taken form Horaces\' Ode, is a clear paradox with its narrow meaning of this poem. The brief translation of the title would be that \"it is sweet and honorable to die for your country\". This paradoxical title is what is taught in schools, while reality is completely something different. The blunt truth is that death in the battlefield is not glorious, it is rather terrifying and agonizing, contrary to what people in general think. The use of mass destruction weapons in this case of Mustard gas, really is a very bad weapon used widely in The Great War. The message that the author is trying to send us is that the war is bad, this comes from a man who experienced the war first hand. This information might be fictional or not but the imagery used makes us feel that he really was present in these moments which are depicted in this poem.
Contrary to other poems of modern authors, this poem is not an abstract complicated poem. It is rather a very simple one it sends its message clearly and with no problem, so the reader does not have to go to the elaborated allusive parts. Also the imagery and simile used here are two main tools that help us understand the level of emotion expressed by the author.

The form used in this poem is simple. It is a three stanza poem 8 plus 8 plus 12 lines. It is a rhymed poem. The author might not have the intellectual background and is clearly seen throughout the poem, but this is not an excuse not to like it. It is a social statement by the very people who took part directly in the war and lost their life in this case Wilfred Owen a young British Officer. This sentiment was not typical one since it is known that U.K was a big Empire till before WWI. He did not confront the masses in U.K because he was in the war, hence we have a soldier with pure christian belief that did not want to commit murder.only half of the essay....what do you think.

| Posted on 2011-12-13 | by a guest


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he not only creates an atmosphere but a disturbing images. Owen truly understands the whole concept of war and how it affects you. An amazing poem to analyse. So many techniques that conjure up a true definition of war
^
Whoever wrote this just to let you know
of course wilfred owen understands the whole concept of war and how it affects you he was in the war he was there he saw the horrors of war he knows what it was like he was injured during the war
^^
Whoever wrote that he like DIED in the war and noting that he really understood what war was about is a very valid point. Just because you go through something doesn\'t mean you are pensive and philosophical about it.

| Posted on 2011-11-23 | by a guest


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smart dudes !! Taa x this has helped loads x use sme of this for my essay ..

| Posted on 2011-11-14 | by a guest


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this is a good peom but why is it so famous and other poems from other wars not as famous

| Posted on 2011-10-04 | by a guest


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wow thank you.. MOST of them were helpful... some were downright disrespectful. thanks anyway.

| Posted on 2011-06-05 | by a guest


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This is so good!!! :) thanks so much to everyone who has commented on this, this is so useful to help discover the meanings behind all the different poetry techniques etc... :) awesome work. keep it up :)
may God be with you always, and may you always know His complete, perfect, indescribable love for you! :)
John 3:16

| Posted on 2011-05-24 | by a guest


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i think among the best of wilfred\'s poem is \"anthem of doomed youth\".it is easier 2 understand compared 2 this poem.by the way the analysis above helped me a lot in understanding the poem bcoz i\'m goin 2 learn bout this poem sooner or later.thank u.

| Posted on 2011-05-17 | by a guest


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In “Dulce et Decorum est”, i uses graphic verbs and innovative descriptions to describe the absolute pity of war, to try and convince my original readers of wars futility.
In Dulce et Decorum est, i begin by describing young soldiers who are “knock- kneed” and “coughing like hags”. i completely destroy the clichéd image of young sprightly soldiers representing the epitome of upright masculinity, and replaces them with a sorry image of prematurely aged young men who are now completely physically derelict.
i carry on to attack any preconceptions of war being a “walk in the park”. The use of explicit verbs such as “guttering , choking, drowning” present the readers with an alternative reality of pain and suffering, only found in the blood stained pits of war. The reader now, after only the first stanza, is confronted with the forcefulness of my ideas and is taken aback, yet enthralled with these blood-chillingly, almost unreal, images. These descriptions made me realise just how oblivious “the people back home” must have been to the wars utter tragicness.
The line, “he lost his colour, far away from here”, shows my ability to give this message in a non conventional manner. The words “he lost his colour” immedietly bring an image to mind of blood slowly draining out from the young man, as he begins to pale, and then the words “far away from here”, place this deathly occurance into a muddy hole, and make the reader feel the man’s loneliness that he felt while suffering this fate. my ability to bring you into the poem and see and experience the horrors that i unfold, made me feel helpless, to just imagine, although my intended readers would have had more ability to act on this knowledge and would have been compelled to do so, if they felt the horror and disbelief I experienced.
the first stanza is structured with iambic pentameter and a ryhme scheme of A,B. as the poem goes on the structure of the poem becomes disorganised and shows owens "tuneless tendencies" once more. this is because the army was regimented and in order in the first paragraph but after the gas attack, everybody panicked and the structure of the army disformed like the stanzas. this also shows the soldiers to be young, nieve and inexperienced when dealing with a problem like this.
The unknown speaker internally shouts Gas! GAS! Quick, boys! , placing the reader in the moment. The exclamatory Gas! and then even more emphatic GAS! are more descriptive of the situation than if the speaker had elaborated intensively on the poison. The sudden jolt mimics the attack and the terror of the soldiers as they race to don the clumsy helmets just in time. The phrases Quick, boys! , ecstasy of fumbling , and clumsy helmets recalls the young age of the inexperienced comrades, providing a stark contrast with the pitted landscape Dim through the misty panes and thick green light.
Throughout the poem, the speaker crescendos in sound, color, speed, and image. The third stanza begins with the jolt of panic and attempt to save their own lives. Just in time progresses to But someone still was yelling out and stumbling/ Like a man in fire or lime. The crescendo is of a lone man representing the worst of the gas that the rest of the men escaped, and caught in a bright spotlight of imagery of fire or lime. The dash at the end of the line pulls us to the next lines Dim through the misty panes and thick green light,/ As under a green sea, I saw him drowning. abruptly decrescendoing to a faded spotlight, misty and thick. The lime dulls to green and the man in fire becomes the muted, more euphemistic drowning. These images allow us to experience not the minute details of the scene, as a bystander would witness, but the fury and pain of fear and toxic air that precisely serve Owen s purpose to warn us against the so-called glories of war marketed to their paradoxically juvenile audience.
My second one.
Dulce et Decorum est
Owen describes a group of young soldiers leaving the front line trenches after a spell of duty there. Owen attacks those who express the old Lie that it is sweet and decorous to die for one s country. Owens bitter anger is clearly conveyed through his vivid imagery and disparaging tone.
Owen uses vivid imagery selecting textured, guttural diction to convey the traumatic events that he experiences. The soldiers exhaustion is effectively conveyd n the metaphor drunk with fatigue. This conjures up the image of men staggering uncoordinatedly, exhausted and deprived of sleep. Their unkempt dishevelled state heightens the readers understanding of the hardship they have endured. They are described as being like old beggars under sacks. The word beggars is effective as it implicates a sense of weakness and helplessness. The connotations associated with beggars are mirrored in the soldiers dirty and torn uniforms which are likened to sacks. The dishevelled description is the opposite to the image of the smart young men marching off to war. The men s movement is described as a trudge also enhancing their apparent state of exhaustion. Their slow laborious pace is echoed in the slow moving pace of poem. The movements are again opposite to that of the marching, smart uniformed perception of soldiers. The pace of the [oem is slowed due to the large amounts of punctuation which is very effective. However in the second verse the ace quickens as the danger for the men increases. This effective change in speed reflects what is happening to the soles making the reader feel more involved. The monosyllabic commands of Gas! GAS! Quick boys is a mean so quickening the pace as the speakers voice becomes more panicked and urgent. The exclamation of Gas is effective due to the use of capitals and exclamation marks indicating the volume and urgency of the information ultimately making the command more emphatic. The literary device of repetition emphasising and highlighting it s significance. As the soldiers react to this danger there is an ecstacy of fumbling as they reach for their gas masks. They are clumsy as they cannot seem to react quickly enough in their soporific state.
My third one.
The opening stanza is characterised by language about \'fatigue\': the soldiers \'marched asleep\', they \'trudge\', and \'limped on\'. They are \'deaf\', \'lame\' and \'blind\'; all rather pitiful language intended to reveal the reality of war and its effects.
The speaker describes a vision in a dream of a gas victim \'guttering, choking, drowning\'. The listed verbs are associated with a lack of air and death.
The language used in the sections depicting the gas attack is strong, representing both the anguish of the victims of the gas attack as well as the effect on those haunted by what they have seen: \'watch the white eyes writhing in his face, / His hanging face\'. The repetition of the word \'face\' makes it clear which element disturbs the speaker most: the transformation in the face of the victim. The use of alliteration on the \'w\' sound reflects the agonised twisting of the gas victim.There is not a clearly defined structure to the poem, although Owen does make use of rhyme, mostly on alternate line endings.
The poem opens with a description of trench life and the conditions faced by the soldiers. Then comes the gas attack, and the poem offers a graphic description of the effects of such an attack.
i likke girls

| Posted on 2011-05-11 | by a guest


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the first stanza is structured with iambic pentameter and a ryhme scheme of A,B. as the poem goes on the structure of the poem becomes disorganised and shows owens \"tuneless tendencies\" once more. this is because the army was regimented and in order in the first paragraph but after the gas attack, everybody panicked and the structure of the army disformed like the stanzas. this also shows the soldiers to be young, nieve and inexperienced when dealing with a problem like this.

| Posted on 2011-05-08 | by a guest


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the first stanza is structured with iambic pentameter and a ryhme scheme of A,B. as the poem goes on the structure of the poem becomes disorganised and shows owens \"tuneless tendencies\" once more. this is because the army was regimented and in order in the first paragraph but after the gas attack, everybody panicked and the structure of the army disformed like the stanzas. this also shows the soldiers to be young and experienced when dealing with a problem like this.

| Posted on 2011-05-08 | by a guest


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Wilfred Owen is a fantastic poet in my opinion. I never brought a poppy before I learnt about his poetry, but now i have to because i always feel ungrateful. He really opens you eyes to the world in many ways i think. thankyou wilfred

| Posted on 2011-04-25 | by a guest


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The analysisreally helped me on my paper!! thanks alot!

| Posted on 2011-03-27 | by a guest


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do it yourself!!! if you\'ve got a test coming up, look on your notes, don\'t ask other people for answers. it counts as cheating.

| Posted on 2011-03-14 | by a guest


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I had to say which poem out of \"Dulce et Decorum est\", \"The Rear Guard\" (Sassoon), and \"The Soldier\" (Brook) was the most effective. Well, here is my answer :)
I believe that from the three,” Dulce et Decorum est” by Wilfred Owen is the most effective. This is because the language he uses makes us understand both the public’s blinded view of war yet also opens up a window through which we can see reality. His use of techniques help us understand his point of view, displaying the horrors of fighting the war. This is not to say the other two poems are not effective. They both convey the emotions to the audience well, yet I believe the factor that really makes Owens poem stand out is the sharpness and clearness of the poem , displayed through techniques such as alliteration and short sentences, yet also the hint of irony that makes us realise that the poem is not only describing the horrors of war, which it does effectively, but is challenging the view of society, the taken up in “The Soldier”, that it is good to die for your country. These contradictory ideas make the poem very effective because it shows us the two sides of the argument, the idea that it is an honour to die for your country yet also the horrors of fighting the war. This in itself makes it more effective to the audience than the other two poems, for, as they convey their meanings well, they do not show both sides of the argument. It is for these reasons that I believe the poem “Dulce et Decorum est” is the most effective.

| Posted on 2011-03-14 | by a guest


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this poem helped me alot!!! we had an essay due on it today and i finished it in time and got an A. i had no clue what the poem was about before this webdite

| Posted on 2011-03-07 | by a guest


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this website helped me with an essay i had to write. this is not cheating. this helps people who cant understand the poem. so whoever says its cheating your wrong!

| Posted on 2011-03-07 | by a guest


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It\'s not bad..
I didn\'t finish readind it didn\'t have time..
But read a bit, it\'s quite good...
Thanks and that most certainly aiint cheating..

| Posted on 2011-02-21 | by a guest


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Surely point 1 is them bent over, because they have been blinded by tear gas, and sacks over them because its a hideous sight?

| Posted on 2011-02-10 | by a guest


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Line 1. Represents men curled up with there knees, holding onto all of their belongs.
Line 2. Hags - could represent age, sludge, mud, swamp, blood, dead bodies, feces, ect.
Line 4. distant rest - a camp away from the frontline where exhausted soliders might rest for a few days. OR distant rest could represt - death.
Line 5. \"Men marched asleep\" Sleep walking? \"lost their boots\" - stuck in the mud or maybe lost a leg, therefore no boot.
Line 6. \"All went lame\" - limbs are fatigue. \"All blind\" - can\'t see or maybe confused.
Line 7. \"Drunk with fatigure\" - METAPHOR! \"hoots\" - the noise made by the shells rushing through the air.
Line 8. \"outstripped\" - outpaced, the soliders have stuggled beyond reach of these shells which are now falling behind them as they struggle to get away from battle. \"Five-Nines\" - 5.9 calibre shells.
Line 9. \"Gas! Gas!\" Mustard gas used in World War I, fills up the lungs, same feeling as drowning. \"ecstasy\" could mean they are high off the gas, or maybe just a state of overwelming emotion.
Line 10. \"helmets\" was an early term for gas masks.
Line 11. The soldier couldn\'t get his gas mask on in time.
Line 12. \"lime\" - a while chalky substance that burns tissue.
Line 13. \"misty panes\" - the glass in the eyepieces of the gas mask. He could see the soldier dying while looking through the \"thick green light\" from the mustard gas through his mask.
Line 14. \"under a green sea\" - the gas caused a green, misty sight.
Line 15. \"In all my dreams, before my helpless sight,\" maybe he was having a flashback... or maybe just so poisoned from the gas that he felt that he was in a dream.
Line 16. \"guttering\" owen probably meant- flickering out like candle or gurling like water draining down a gutter, referring to the sounds in the throat of the choking soldier, or it might be a sound partly stuttering. Or maybe he really was having a flashback, and the solider was coming back to him.
Line 18. \"behind the wagon that we flung him in,\" They were all in a hurry, didn\'t have time to mourn over a dead solider. The war makes people unemotional.
Line 19. Refers to the soldier roling his eyes in the back of his head.
Line 20. \"devil\'s sick of sin,\" devil is never sick of sin, METAPHOR, meaning horrible sight to see.
Line 21. \"at every jolt\" - the jot of the wagon.
Line 22. The gas was still burning inside his body.
Line 23. Cud - normally the regurgitated grass that cows chew, usually green and bubbling. There was a similar looking material issuing from the soldiers mouth.
Line 24. \"incurable sores\" - scars, or maybe trauma.
These young kids were very impressionable.
Line 25-28. \"high zest\" - idealistic enthusiasm. \"my frieind, would not tell you with such high zest,\" refers to the young soldiers that are so naive when they sign up to serve their country. The military will never tell you the truth, only \"the old lie; Dulce et Decorum est,\" which means \"it is sweet and fitting to fight and die for your country.\" It\'s latin!!
That\'s my analysis!

| Posted on 2011-02-05 | by a guest


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Line 1. Represents men curled up with there knees, holding onto all of their belongs.
Line 2. Hags - could represent age, sludge, mud, swamp, blood, dead bodies, feces, ect.
Line 4. distant rest - a camp away from the frontline where exhausted soliders might rest for a few days. OR distant rest could represt - death.
Line 5. \"Men marched asleep\" Sleep walking? \"lost their boots\" - stuck in the mud or maybe lost a leg, therefore no boot.
Line 6. \"All went lame\" - limbs are fatigue. \"All blind\" - can\'t see or maybe confused.
Line 7. \"Drunk with fatigure\" - METAPHOR! \"hoots\" - the noise made by the shells rushing through the air.
Line 8. \"outstripped\" - outpaced, the soliders have stuggled beyond reach of these shells which are now falling behind them as they struggle to get away from battle. \"Five-Nines\" - 5.9 calibre shells.
Line 9. \"Gas! Gas!\" Mustard gas used in World War I, fills up the lungs, same feeling as drowning. \"ecstasy\" could mean they are high off the gas, or maybe just a state of overwelming emotion.
Line 10. \"helmets\" was an early term for gas masks.
Line 11. The soldier couldn\'t get his gas mask on in time.
Line 12. \"lime\" - a while chalky substance that burns tissue.
Line 13. \"misty panes\" - the glass in the eyepieces of the gas mask. He could see the soldier dying while looking through the \"thick green light\" from the mustard gas through his mask.
Line 14. \"under a green sea\" - the gas caused a green, misty sight.
Line 15. \"In all my dreams, before my helpless sight,\" maybe he was having a flashback... or maybe just so poisoned from the gas that he felt that he was in a dream.
Line 16. \"guttering\" owen probably meant- flickering out like candle or gurling like water draining down a gutter, referring to the sounds in the throat of the choking soldier, or it might be a sound partly stuttering. Or maybe he really was having a flashback, and the solider was coming back to him.
Line 18. \"behind the wagon that we flung him in,\" They were all in a hurry, didn\'t have time to mourn over a dead solider. The war makes people unemotional.
Line 19. Refers to the soldier roling his eyes in the back of his head.
Line 20. \"devil\'s sick of sin,\" devil is never sick of sin, METAPHOR, meaning horrible sight to see.
Line 21. \"at every jolt\" - the jot of the wagon.
Line 22. The gas was still burning inside his body.
Line 23. Cud - normally the regurgitated grass that cows chew, usually green and bubbling. There was a similar looking material issuing from the soldiers mouth.
Line 24. \"incurable sores\" - scars, or maybe trauma.
These young kids were very impressionable.
Line 25-28. \"high zest\" - idealistic enthusiasm. \"my frieind, would not tell you with such high zest,\" refers to the young soldiers that are so naive when they sign up to serve their country. The military will never tell you the truth, only \"the old lie; Dulce et Decorum est,\" which means \"it is sweet and fitting to fight and die for your country.\" It\'s latin!!
That\'s my analysis!

| Posted on 2011-02-05 | by a guest


.: :.

i found tis poem high larrious!!!
when he was deaded it was major lolz
wilfred owen is so funny its such a classic form of humor this poem made me lol in my roflcopter
ww1 lol

| Posted on 2011-01-05 | by a guest


.: :.

no long tin, dis tin sbout war yehh n dat no 1 lyked it yehh

| Posted on 2010-12-12 | by a guest


.: :.

I need to know why does the word \'flung\' help create an effect of the war, in line 2 in stanza 3.

| Posted on 2010-11-28 | by a guest


.: :.

he not only creates an atmosphere but a disturbing images. Owen truly understands the whole concept of war and how it affects you. An amazing poem to analyse. So many techniques that conjure up a true definition of war
^
Whoever wrote this just to let you know
of course wilfred owen understands the whole concept of war and how it affects you he was in the war he was there he saw the horrors of war he knows what it was like he was injured during the war.

| Posted on 2010-11-22 | by a guest


.: :.

this has been a huge help, well some of more legitimate answers were.

| Posted on 2010-11-16 | by a guest


.: :.

this has been a huge help, well some of more legitimate answers were.

| Posted on 2010-11-16 | by a guest




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