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The Song Of Wandering Aengus Analysis



Author: poem of William Butler Yeats Type: poem Views: 67

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I went out to the hazel wood,

Because a fire was in my head,

And cut and peeled a hazel wand,

And hooked a berry to a thread;

And when white moths were on the wing,

And moth-like stars were flickering out,

I dropped the berry in a stream

And caught a little silver trout.

When I had laid it on the floor

I went to blow the fire aflame,

But something rustled on the floor,

And some one called me by my name:

It had become a glimmering girl

With apple blossom in her hair

Who called me by my name and ran

And faded through the brightening air.

Though I am old with wandering

Through hollow lads and hilly lands.

I will find out where she has gone,

And kiss her lips and take her hands;

And walk among long dappled grass,

And pluck till time and times are done

The silver apples of the moon,

The golden apples of the sun.






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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: Song Of Wandering Aengus :.

THE SONG OF WANDERING AENGUS
Before reading anything else, I'm going to try and express what it all points at, in its immediacy, for me having just read it.
The poem expresses the transformation of an essential hunger in the human heart. At times asleep, at others it cries out and agitates us with a yearning for something mysterious, yet vitally lacking. So we find our hunger, a love for an illusive perfection that could never seemingly be attained or possessed, in this material world.
It can lead us to behave seemingly childishly, at those times when we are more awake to it. Just as children are, before they are, so often, trained to forget. I believe this 'hunger' or 'love' is integral to our true human nature, but is also a treasure which we are so capable of forgetting, in this world of 'burdens of practicality'.
Sometimes we are misdiagnosed, especially by our own selves! Imagining all manner of reasons for our condition of 'wanting'. But it is what makes the writer write, the painter paint, the chef cook and parents nurture. It can also drive us mad. It is the love of Beauty and can take as many forms as there are people on the face of the planet.
LINES OF FIRST VERSE
1,The hazel wood may be our own special private place where we can stand outside 'the world of burdens and practicality', to find ourselves again.
2,I love this second line, for me its like his heart isn't allowing his head to be in peace.
3&4,The joy of returning to nature and the simplicity of the moment. In harmony again with our true selves and real home.
5,6 His presence is responded to, he is in the 'magical' place where witness and witnessed become united in belonging together. A place of beauty where good things are possible.
7, For some reason this 'berry' reminds me of humility.
8, Which pays off!
SECOND VERSE
1 Act of examining and coming to terms with, something which you have received, but are as yet perhaps uncertain about what it's true nature actually is.
2 Judged and about to respond with an act of preparation according to what he thinks it is.
3 Perhaps he has misjudged or underestimated!
4 His own Soul calls him.
5 Beautifully personified in a perfect form.
6 Fragrance stimulates the most immediate sense sensation, easy to imagine a swoon.
7 His own soul allured him to leave this world.
8 She was to perfect to linger in the fixety of it (our world) though she belonged to non other than its essence of light.
THIRD VERSE
1 Old enough to be weary of this world, resigned and close to an acceptance of mortality (death).
2 Wise in the ways of the world, well travelled and experienced.
3 New resolve has been fired by the recognition of his beloved.
4 Find rapture and union with her.
5 Into the next hidden world where he could be with her.
6 Beyond time...
7 But in a conscious after life, where he is still in relationship with his beloved, in differently changing mysterious forms.
Thoughts of 'Soloman'

| Posted on 2008-02-29 | by a guest


.: Song Of Wandering Aengus :.

THE SONG OF WANDERING AENGUS
Before reading anything else, I'm going to try and express what it all points at, in its immediacy, for me having just read it.
The poem expresses the transformation of an essential hunger in the human heart. At times asleep, at others it cries out and agitates us with a yearning for something mysterious, yet vitally lacking. So we find our hunger, a love for an illusive perfection that could never seemingly be attained or possessed, in this material world.
It can lead us to behave seemingly childishly, at those times when we are more awake to it. Just as children are, before they are, so often, trained to forget. I believe this 'hunger' or 'love' is integral to our true human nature, but is also a treasure which we are so capable of forgetting, in this world of 'burdens of practicality'.
Sometimes we are misdiagnosed, especially by our own selves! Imagining all manner of reasons for our condition of 'wanting'. But it is what makes the writer write, the painter paint, the chef cook and parents nurture. It can also drive us mad. It is the love of Beauty and can take as many forms as there are people on the face of the planet.
LINES OF FIRST VERSE
1,The hazel wood may be our own special private place where we can stand outside 'the world of burdens and practicality', to find ourselves again.
2,I love this second line, for me its like his heart isn't allowing his head to be in peace.
3&4,The joy of returning to nature and the simplicity of the moment. In harmony again with our true selves and real home.
5,6 His presence is responded to, he is in the 'magical' place where witness and witnessed become united in belonging together. A place of beauty where good things are possible.
7, For some reason this 'berry' reminds me of humility.
8, Which pays off!
SECOND VERSE
1 Act of examining and coming to terms with, something which you have received, but are as yet perhaps uncertain about what it's true nature actually is.
2 Judged and about to respond with an act of preparation according to what he thinks it is.
3 Perhaps he has misjudged or underestimated!
4 His own Soul calls him.
5 Beautifully personified in a perfect form.
6 Fragrance stimulates the most immediate sense sensation, easy to imagine a swoon.
7 His own soul allured him to leave this world.
8 She was to perfect to linger in the fixety of it (our world) though she belonged to non other than its essence of light.
THIRD VERSE
1 Old enough to be weary of this world, resigned and close to an acceptance of mortality (death).
2 Wise in the ways of the world, well travelled and experienced.
3 New resolve has been fired by the recognition of his beloved.
4 Find rapture and union with her.
5 Into the next hidden world where he could be with her.
6 Beyond time...
7 But in a conscious after life, where he is still in relationship with his beloved, in differently changing mysterious forms.

| Posted on 2008-02-29 | by a guest




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