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On the Grasshopper and Cricket Analysis



Author: Poetry of John Keats Type: Poetry Views: 1311





The poetry of earth is never dead:

When all the birds are faint with the hot sun,

And hide in cooling trees, a voice will run

From hedge to hedge about the new-mown mead;

That is the Grasshopper's--he takes the lead

In summer luxury,--he has never done

With his delights; for when tired out with fun

He rests at ease beneath some pleasant weed.

The poetry of earth is ceasing never:

On a lone winter evening, when the frost

Has wrought a silence, from the stove there shrills

The Cricket's song, in warmth increasing ever,

And seems to one in drowsiness half lost,

The Grasshopper's among some grassy hills.





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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

Does anyone know what Keats meant by the quote.. "When the frost / Has wrought a silence..??
Thanks x

| Posted on 2014-09-20 | by a guest


.: :.

John keats tells us that the nature and beauty of earth will never die or end.He describes the nature as the hot sun,cooling trees,and hedge to hedge. When the birds are tired,the grasshopper comes out to sing in summer under a pleasant weed.Then he repeats again that the poetry of earth will never stop.In a cold winter at evening comes out the cricket to take the lead in winter.He begins to sing near the stove.Keats wanted to tell us that the cycle of earth will never end it will keep completing each other(the summer and winter),(grasshopper and cricket).

| Posted on 2014-06-07 | by a guest


.: :.

John keats tells us that the nature and beauty of earth will never die or end.He describes the nature as the hot sun,cooling trees,and hedge to hedge. When the birds are tired,the grasshopper comes out to sing in summer under a pleasant weed.Then he repeats again that the poetry of earth will never stop.In a cold winter at evening comes out the cricket to take the lead in winter.He begins to sing near the stove.Keats wanted to tell us that the cycle of earth will never end it will keep completing each other(the summer and winter),(grasshopper and cricket).

| Posted on 2014-06-07 | by a guest


.: :.

John keats tells us that the nature and beauty of earth will never die or end.He describes the nature as the hot sun,cooling trees,and hedge to hedge. When the birds are tired,the grasshopper comes out to sing in summer under a pleasant weed.Then he repeats again that the poetry of earth will never stop.In a cold winter at evening comes out the cricket to take the lead in winter.He begins to sing near the stove.Keats wanted to tell us that the cycle of earth will never end it will keep completing each other(the summer and winter),(grasshopper and cricket).

| Posted on 2014-06-07 | by a guest


.: :.

John keats tells us that the nature and beauty of earth will never die or end.He describes the nature as the hot sun,cooling trees,and hedge to hedge. When the birds are tired,the grasshopper comes out to sing in summer under a pleasant weed.Then he repeats again that the poetry of earth will never stop.In a cold winter at evening comes out the cricket to take the lead in winter.He begins to sing near the stove.Keats wanted to tell us that the cycle of earth will never end it will keep completing each other(the summer and winter),(grasshopper and cricket).

| Posted on 2014-06-07 | by a guest


.: :.

John keats tells us that the nature and beauty of earth will never die or end.He describes the nature as the hot sun,cooling trees,and hedge to hedge. When the birds are tired,the grasshopper comes out to sing in summer under a pleasant weed.Then he repeats again that the poetry of earth will never stop.In a cold winter at evening comes out the cricket to take the lead in winter.He begins to sing near the stove.Keats wanted to tell us that the cycle of earth will never end it will keep completing each other(the summer and winter),(grasshopper and cricket).

| Posted on 2014-06-07 | by a guest


.: :.

this poetry is amazing it is a sonnet which contain octave and seset it is a meaningfull and a enjoying poem

| Posted on 2013-10-24 | by a guest


.: :.

John Keats is a nature lover. He tells us about the major differences between a grasshopper and a cricket. In his opinion,the earth will never die. The earth is full of sounds and experiences of nature. He tells us that a grasshopper likes to go with warmth and mornings whereas a cricket likes to live in dark and likes cold nights. The grasshopper is full of joy jumping from one place to another and a cricket creates sound which is heard all over the place.

| Posted on 2013-04-03 | by a guest


.: :.

hi,this is minakshi and your all ideas gave me suggestions to write a good summary on this poem

| Posted on 2013-03-20 | by a guest


.: :.

haha This poem is BULL SHIT. I rather go and die then read tis shit. Oh and gues wat i just had sex!!! yea buddy

| Posted on 2012-05-13 | by a guest


.: :.

i believe it is abt the fable nd also da comparison of the two seasons..but please don\'t mess in here some ppl are seriously getting something useful from here and hypers saty at peace please :)
excellent poen jhonny

| Posted on 2012-04-14 | by a guest


.: :.

Some specialists tell that business loans help a lot of people to live their own way, just because they can feel free to buy needed stuff. Furthermore, various banks present student loan for different classes of people.

| Posted on 2012-03-25 | by a guest


.: :.

This particular sonnet was written when he was 21.
It is in the Petrarchan or Italian form of the sonnet with an octave
(here quite clearly divided into two quatrains) and a sestet, without a
rhyming couplet at the end. Like Milton, who also used this form, he
wrote sonnets about many different subjects, not specifically, as early
sonnet writers tended to, about love.
The poem was written as a response to a sort of competition between
himself and his great friend, Leigh Hunt, as to who could write the best
verse, in a short time, on a specified topic. Keats won on this occasion,
although he generously avowed that he preferred the other poet’s
attempt. Think of parallels with (e.g.) Aesop’s fable ‘The Ant and the
Grasshopper’ in which the grasshopper light-heartedly plays during the
Summer, while the Ant toils. When Winter comes, the grasshopper, unlike
the Ant is ill prepared for its severity. (Cf. also Poems 40 and 41 in Songs
of Ourselves: Isaac Watts, ‘The Ant or Emmet’ and Abraham Cowley, x the grasshopper is a diurnal insect, the cricket nocturnal. They both like
warmth, hence the reference to the stove as a home for the cricket.
Line 8: weed: the poetic use of this word denotes a small plant and is quite neutral,
with no implications of not being wanted or being out of control.

| Posted on 2011-04-20 | by a guest


.: :.

This is an analysis I did for my poetry workshop class:
The speaker of this poem is someone who appreciates the nature of poetry in its finest detail – from the voice of the grasshopper to the song of the cricket. The speaker is speaking directly to those that perhaps do not take the time to admire the poetry that nature has to offer. The reader is likely to feel favorably towards the speaker considering his or her (for the sake of the paper, I’ll use “his”) tone of admiration and the softness the poem seems to emanate. The poem itself uses lots of “soft” consonant sounds such as “poetry,” “earth,” “birds,” “voice,” “hedge,” “luxury,” and other words that force a person to kind of murmur the poem carefully when spoken aloud. The speaker continues his argument of the continuing expression of poetry by presenting the reader with a winter example and a summer example as if to say, “Rain or shine, cold or hot, poetry persists.”
The title itself forces the reader to acknowledge the roles that the Grasshopper and the Cricket play in this expression of poetry. Without the title, the reader could consider the poetry itself as the star of the poem without considering the Grasshopper or the Cricket as real contributors, but merely as examples of this poetry. Keats further confirms the authority of the Grasshopper and the Cricket by capitalizing the first letter of their “names,” giving them titles and more power within the poem.
There are two dominating themes of heat or warmth presented in the poem. The first is the summer itself which is captained by the Grasshopper and the second is the song of the Cricket during the cold season. The Grasshopper is presented as an appreciator of the “summer luxury” and relishes in the gift of warmth with its continuous “voice” that “run[s] from hedge to hedge.” In this case, the Grasshopper himself is capable of having his “delights” and “fun” with minimal effort and is able to rest if it feels tired. This example follows the line “The poetry of earth is never dead,” demonstrating for us the liveliness of poetry that present and easy to recognize. The Cricket is presented as an appreciator of this warmth and poetry, but his appreciation is “never ceasing” which becomes the sonnets Volta. The cricket amidst the cold air, frost, and silence works to create a song that all can appreciate and simultaneous to give itself warmth.
The remaining couplet is more difficult to decipher:
And seems to one in drowsiness half lost
The Grasshopper’s among some grassy hills.
The “one” that the speaker is referring to is quite possibly himself. In “drowsiness half lost” he may be speaking about being half asleep or half enchanted by the sounds of the Cricket’s song. Here he seems to be comparing the Cricket to the Grasshopper as potentially some lost cousin who has adapted itself to appreciate the winter just as much as his distant relative appreciates the summer. Neither “character” is superior to the other, but what the speaker may be trying to state is that even when pushed into an environment that seems impossible to enjoy, one can still have poetry even by making it yourself. This poetry will be just as good as the poetry that came so easily to you in better times. I believe this is the reason why the first line “The poetry of earth is never dead” is repeated, yet altered in the Volta- “The poetry of earth is ceasing never.” Even when these poetic energies appear to be dead, they are not.
Assonance is occasionally used and it does help create the mood of relaxation and contemplation. “Earth,” “birds,” and other “r” sounds are dribbled throughout the poem along with the small alliteration of “new-mown mead.” These words feel like soft murmers. In the line, “He rests at ease beneath some pleasant weed,” all of these “ee” sounds seem to stretch and make the reader relaxed as if he was also slowing down and enjoying a rest beneath a blade of grass. When the speaker turns and begins to describe winter time the assonance delves into long “o” sounds such as “lone,” “stove,” “song,” and “drowsiness.” These sounds accentuate a feeling of loneliness and also create focus on the word “lone” itself. “Frost” and “wrought” are emphasized when together creating a chilling sensation.
The rhyming scheme is a little bizarre: a, b, b, a, a, b, b, a, c, d, e, c, d, e. After some page flipping, I’ve found that it is a caudated sonnet developed by Milton. As to why Keats decided to write in this particular format is lost to me. I do appreciate the form eliminating it’s “sing-songy” feel which might detract from the subject of the poem. Strangly, the first two quatrains are more “sing-songy” and are used to describe the Grasshopper who “reads” his poetry by voice. The Cricket who actually performs a type of music has the least musical form of the sonnet. Intentional? Probably not. Keats also does not perfectly rhyme the words “dead” and “mead.” This takes away emphasis from the word “dead,” but when the line is repeated the reader is forced to look back at the differences. “Dead” become highlighted by the Volta instead of its rhyming word. This forces the reader to acknowledge the comparison of the Cricket to the Grasshopper (if that wasn’t already established enough) and also of summer to winter.
Meter is virtually nonexistent at times. “Hot sun” feels like a spondee and the reader is forced to endure its heat just a little longer than a regular iambic foot would have allowed. “New-mown mead” feels sluggish as well, but the reader pauses her more to enjoy the sounds of the “m’s”. Perhaps, this is a mechanism for the reader to feel a sense of enjoyment with words the way that the Grasshopper feels about newly mown grass. “That is the Grasshopper’s” stands alone and independent, followed by a dash and his title for the summer, “he takes the lead in summer luxury.” Lines 5 and 6 in total seems to completely ignore iambic meter and force us to acknowledge it’s words as something that can exist outside of the poem as it continues: “he has never done with his delights…” In the Volta, “the poetry of earth is ceasing never,” there is an additional syllable. Once again we are forced to look at this sentence and are reminded to look at its relative, the first line. “On a lone …” starts out with muddled iambic meter. Keats is continuing to drag the reader into the winter scenario until he finally picks up the meter again in the line, “winter evening when the frost / has wroght a silence, from the stove there shrills…” Keats continues this back and forth use of meter all the way to right before the couplet.

| Posted on 2011-03-25 | by a guest


.: :.

John keats talks bout nature basically relating it also to life.gd lk 2 every one i cme on dis site cos i hv a literature exam 2marrow.it really helped.thks and haters why dont U go do smething else apert 4rm hating? honestly try it!

| Posted on 2011-03-21 | by a guest


.: :.

thanks for everyone who wrote some analysis it really helped me in my studies!!!

| Posted on 2011-02-04 | by a guest


.: :.

Could it also be connected to the Grasshopper and Cricket Fable? Think about it.

| Posted on 2011-01-30 | by a guest


.: :.

Well I believe that the poet compares the two main seasons of the year by placing these two animals in his poem.

| Posted on 2011-01-26 | by a guest


.: :.

I think that keats was having a bate when he was writing this poem because its very sexual LOL

| Posted on 2011-01-24 | by a guest


.: :.

There are almost all the informations that I guessed and didn\'t even think about. I am thanking to all the friends here who wrote all these comments. The only thing to be added (if someone else didn\'t include):
It is a sonnet which reflects the poets belief that the beauty of nature never ends. In the summer the beauty is heard in the Grasshoppers\' call, and in the winter it is shown by the shrill of the Cricket. It also shows two main dominating themes; heat and warmth. The first is mentioned in this summer when the grasshopper is mentioned and the other is mentioned when we hear the song of the cricket in the winter during the cold weather. The song warms us deep inside. Another detail, the grasshopper is presented as an appreciator of the summer luxury and relished with the gift warmth, \"that runs from hedge to hedge,\" in this case the grasshopper himself is capable of having delights with minimum effort and is able to rest himself.
That\'s all that I would like to include, good luck guys :D

| Posted on 2011-01-07 | by a guest


.: :.

hey everyone..check this site out for IGCSE poetry - it has some great commentaries. x

| Posted on 2011-01-04 | by a guest


.: :.

hey everyone..check this site out for IGCSE poetry - it has some great commentaries.

| Posted on 2011-01-04 | by a guest


.: :.

I think what some people wrote here is amazing. We should value the fact that they have shared their responses here and so we should try to benifit from it.If any one doesnot like it, he should not post rude comments. Personally i gained a lot from it! =)

| Posted on 2010-12-14 | by a guest


.: :.

I think what some people wrote here is amazing. We should value the fact that they have shared their responses here and so we should try to benifit from it.If any one doesnot like it, he should not post rude comments. Personally i gained a lot from it! =)

| Posted on 2010-12-14 | by a guest


.: :.

Im sooo confused...can someone explain to me what the thesis is of this poem?.

| Posted on 2010-11-07 | by a guest


.: :.

This is an analysis I did for my poetry workshop class:
The speaker of this poem is someone who appreciates the nature of poetry in its finest detail – from the voice of the grasshopper to the song of the cricket. The speaker is speaking directly to those that perhaps do not take the time to admire the poetry that nature has to offer. The reader is likely to feel favorably towards the speaker considering his or her (for the sake of the paper, I’ll use “his”) tone of admiration and the softness the poem seems to emanate. The poem itself uses lots of “soft” consonant sounds such as “poetry,” “earth,” “birds,” “voice,” “hedge,” “luxury,” and other words that force a person to kind of murmur the poem carefully when spoken aloud. The speaker continues his argument of the continuing expression of poetry by presenting the reader with a winter example and a summer example as if to say, “Rain or shine, cold or hot, poetry persists.”
The title itself forces the reader to acknowledge the roles that the Grasshopper and the Cricket play in this expression of poetry. Without the title, the reader could consider the poetry itself as the star of the poem without considering the Grasshopper or the Cricket as real contributors, but merely as examples of this poetry. Keats further confirms the authority of the Grasshopper and the Cricket by capitalizing the first letter of their “names,” giving them titles and more power within the poem.
There are two dominating themes of heat or warmth presented in the poem. The first is the summer itself which is captained by the Grasshopper and the second is the song of the Cricket during the cold season. The Grasshopper is presented as an appreciator of the “summer luxury” and relishes in the gift of warmth with its continuous “voice” that “run[s] from hedge to hedge.” In this case, the Grasshopper himself is capable of having his “delights” and “fun” with minimal effort and is able to rest if it feels tired. This example follows the line “The poetry of earth is never dead,” demonstrating for us the liveliness of poetry that present and easy to recognize. The Cricket is presented as an appreciator of this warmth and poetry, but his appreciation is “never ceasing” which becomes the sonnets Volta. The cricket amidst the cold air, frost, and silence works to create a song that all can appreciate and simultaneous to give itself warmth.
The remaining couplet is more difficult to decipher:
And seems to one in drowsiness half lost
The Grasshopper’s among some grassy hills.
The “one” that the speaker is referring to is quite possibly himself. In “drowsiness half lost” he may be speaking about being half asleep or half enchanted by the sounds of the Cricket’s song. Here he seems to be comparing the Cricket to the Grasshopper as potentially some lost cousin who has adapted itself to appreciate the winter just as much as his distant relative appreciates the summer. Neither “character” is superior to the other, but what the speaker may be trying to state is that even when pushed into an environment that seems impossible to enjoy, one can still have poetry even by making it yourself. This poetry will be just as good as the poetry that came so easily to you in better times. I believe this is the reason why the first line “The poetry of earth is never dead” is repeated, yet altered in the Volta- “The poetry of earth is ceasing never.” Even when these poetic energies appear to be dead, they are not.
Assonance is occasionally used and it does help create the mood of relaxation and contemplation. “Earth,” “birds,” and other “r” sounds are dribbled throughout the poem along with the small alliteration of “new-mown mead.” These words feel like soft murmers. In the line, “He rests at ease beneath some pleasant weed,” all of these “ee” sounds seem to stretch and make the reader relaxed as if he was also slowing down and enjoying a rest beneath a blade of grass. When the speaker turns and begins to describe winter time the assonance delves into long “o” sounds such as “lone,” “stove,” “song,” and “drowsiness.” These sounds accentuate a feeling of loneliness and also create focus on the word “lone” itself. “Frost” and “wrought” are emphasized when together creating a chilling sensation.
The rhyming scheme is a little bizarre: a, b, b, a, a, b, b, a, c, d, e, c, d, e. After some page flipping, I’ve found that it is a caudated sonnet developed by Milton. As to why Keats decided to write in this particular format is lost to me. I do appreciate the form eliminating it’s “sing-songy” feel which might detract from the subject of the poem. Strangly, the first two quatrains are more “sing-songy” and are used to describe the Grasshopper who “reads” his poetry by voice. The Cricket who actually performs a type of music has the least musical form of the sonnet. Intentional? Probably not. Keats also does not perfectly rhyme the words “dead” and “mead.” This takes away emphasis from the word “dead,” but when the line is repeated the reader is forced to look back at the differences. “Dead” become highlighted by the Volta instead of its rhyming word. This forces the reader to acknowledge the comparison of the Cricket to the Grasshopper (if that wasn’t already established enough) and also of summer to winter.
Meter is virtually nonexistent at times. “Hot sun” feels like a spondee and the reader is forced to endure its heat just a little longer than a regular iambic foot would have allowed. “New-mown mead” feels sluggish as well, but the reader pauses her more to enjoy the sounds of the “m’s”. Perhaps, this is a mechanism for the reader to feel a sense of enjoyment with words the way that the Grasshopper feels about newly mown grass. “That is the Grasshopper’s” stands alone and independent, followed by a dash and his title for the summer, “he takes the lead in summer luxury.” Lines 5 and 6 in total seems to completely ignore iambic meter and force us to acknowledge it’s words as something that can exist outside of the poem as it continues: “he has never done with his delights…” In the Volta, “the poetry of earth is ceasing never,” there is an additional syllable. Once again we are forced to look at this sentence and are reminded to look at its relative, the first line. “On a lone …” starts out with muddled iambic meter. Keats is continuing to drag the reader into the winter scenario until he finally picks up the meter again in the line, “winter evening when the frost / has wroght a silence, from the stove there shrills…” Keats continues this back and forth use of meter all the way to right before the couplet.

| Posted on 2010-11-04 | by a guest


.: :.

there isn\'t very much detail on this poem. some one should try to write something about it.

| Posted on 2010-10-28 | by a guest


.: :.

CAn someone analyse this stuff? with quotes and explanations wud be much appreciated! im writing tommorow and some of this has been really helpfull!!
but some people are asses haha, and really what kind of fags talk smack on a poetry discussion site!!?? go get some girlfreinds u wankers!

| Posted on 2010-10-28 | by a guest


.: :.

this poem is about bestiality. \'That is the....grasshopper takes the lead\' talks of the grasshopper mounting the cricket and performing coitus with the cricket. Strong imagery is used to show the beauty of inter species intercourse. this poem is undoubtedly about sex!

| Posted on 2010-10-28 | by a guest


.: :.

I kissed a little boy and i liked it. the taste of his cherry capstick. oh. and the poem was BULLSHIT

| Posted on 2010-10-19 | by a guest


.: :.

Peple who want to give nasty comments please keep them to yourself. This site actually helps some people and if u don\'t like it then don\'t come on it. No one wants to know your unappreciative comments.

| Posted on 2010-10-14 | by a guest


.: :.

hahaha. i like the comment that says \"who posts shit like ths\" nice one.

| Posted on 2010-10-06 | by a guest


.: :.

In our opinion, this poem describes the cyclic nature of life; of how in our worst times, there is still the hope of the best ones returning eventually. The contrast between the octet and the sestet clearly marks two opposite seasons of the year which are summer and winter, represennting thw good and bad times respectively.
La trece la enloquece.XOXO

| Posted on 2010-10-04 | by a guest


.: :.

To you idiots:
Go get a life instead of talking bullshit!

| Posted on 2010-10-04 | by a guest


.: :.

I think based on the poem \'The Grasshopper and The Cricket\', John Keats was thinking about beuaty more than anything, his peoms are a true delight to read.
Imogen Henry
year 11 student
Two Boats School
Ascension Island
S.A.O

| Posted on 2010-09-23 | by a guest


.: :.

A lot of you have come with some good theories and ideas, going back into his past and relating certain aspects of his life to the poem. As a fellow writer myself, I do that as well sometimes, and I find that is a very intrigiuing thought.
I\'ve learnt a lot on this site, like how Keats is a pantheist and hence believe in God and Nature as equal. If you think about it, it\'s true really, because Pan is the Greek God of Nature. I also learnt about losing his family etc and I can\'t thank you all enough for your amazing insight\'s and thoughts. It\'s going to help me with my analysis of this sonnet for Literature :)
My personal opinion of this is that Keats was really just aiming at two things.
1. To show people that beauty in youth, is just as beautiful as in old age.
2. That the cycle of life will allows and forever more continue. Hell, Life tself will always go on, no more how crap it is - things wil get positive eventually, and he\'s telling us to have hope an faith.
At first, I really didn\'t understand it nor did I like it, but I think I\'m slowly coming around.
If you do look closely as well, you\'ll notice a rhyme sceme which I feel makes the sonnet enjoyable to read and gives it a steady beat and easy flow.
There\'s really not that much use of literary devices, like alliteration, sibilane etc. but one thing I noticed were the words \'cooling trees\' When related to the summer, the use of cooling completely contradicts what we all think of summer [atleast for me, I live alongst the equator] and that just shows the height of extent of it all. Whilst Keats makes good uses of the senses, he doesnt lose focus on nature, and even gets us wondering, are we the grasshopper? Is God \'earth\'?
And well really, any poet who can make you think about his work days after reading it, is a damn good poet.

| Posted on 2010-09-19 | by a guest


.: :.

John Keats poetry extends the human thought process. The ideas of the beauty found in the simplicty of nature and Keats own mortality are common themes throughout his literature. Keats liturature provoks the senuality of the human mind with the use of senses: taste, smell, sound etc. Images of nature and the encomprehensive concept of the beauty of nature at a human level is illustrated consistantly throughout most of his renowed poetry. Mortality and the Keats philosphy of mortality are also common themes, lifes moments remaning constant unmarked by the passage of time(ode on a grecian urn) and cycle of seasons reflected in many of his pieces. Its was his own mortality that he wanted to obtain. This is why his poetry is so important as it reflects the very artistic and charimatic views of a young romantic peot.It is through Keats peotry that he will always be remembered and his philosophy of life and can be taught to generations to come, just like the 'slyvan historian'in the grecian urn.

| Posted on 2010-07-13 | by a guest


.: :.

god bless john heats for his amazing poems. on the grasshopper and cricket emphasize on the immortality and eternity of nature, nature is a contrast to his life where he always had the feeling of ending since he was suffering from tuberculosis and knew he would not last forever.... there plenty of metaphors like voice... etc

| Posted on 2010-06-04 | by a guest


.: :.

the poem is beautiful it brings out the colour of my wifes eyes it makes me feel warm and like cuddling you. I love this poem and i give it my kind regards yours sincerely Albertine Bedscwatch
xoxo

| Posted on 2010-06-01 | by a guest


.: :.

In order to fully understand this poem you must first consider who the poet was and what may have influenced him to produce it. It is very well known that alike his mother Keats died of TB. Therefore references to feeling "faint" could strongly suggest the relevancy of context here. What is also very interesting is the fact that in some cultures the grasshopper is a symbol of a reincarnated family member (As Keats lost his mother, faitha dn brother, it is likely he sees it as one of them). The consistency of their presence throuhgout the poem shows that Keats doesant feel alone in this time of hardship, and that he views life as a positive time in which beauty thrives.

| Posted on 2010-05-31 | by a guest




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