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Ulysses Analysis



Author: Poetry of Alfred, Lord Tennyson Type: Poetry Views: 10145





It little profits that an idle king,

By this still hearth, among these barren crags,

Match'd with an aged wife, I mete and dole

Unequal laws unto a savage race,

That hoard, and sleep, and feed, and know not me.

I cannot rest from travel; I will drink

Life to the lees.All times I have enjoy'd

Greatly, have suffer'd greatly, both with those

That loved me, and alone; on shore, and when

Thro' scudding drifts the rainy Hyades

Vext the dim sea.I am become a name;

For always roaming with a hungry heart

Much have I seen and known,-- cities of men

And manners, climates, councils, governments,

Myself not least, but honor'd of them all,--

And drunk delight of battle with my peers,

Far on the ringing plains of windy Troy.

I am a part of all that I have met;

Yet all experience is an arch wherethro'

Gleams that untravell'd world whose margin fades

For ever and for ever when I move.

How dull it is to pause, to make an end,

To rust unburnish'd, not to shine in use!

As tho' to breathe were life!Life piled on life

Were all too little, and of one to me

Little remains; but every hour is saved

>From that eternal silence, something more,

A bringer of new things; and vile it were

For some three suns to store and hoard myself,

And this gray spirit yearning in desire

To follow knowledge like a sinking star,

Beyond the utmost bound of human thought.

This is my son, mine own Telemachus,

to whom I leave the sceptre and the isle,--

Well-loved of me, discerning to fulfill

This labor, by slow prudence to make mild

A rugged people, and thro' soft degrees

Subdue them to the useful and the good.

Most blameless is he, centred in the sphere

Of common duties, decent not to fail

In offices of tenderness, and pay

Meet adoration to my household gods,

When I am gone.He works his work, I mine.

There lies the port; the vessel puffs her sail;

There gloom the dark, broad seas.My mariners,

Souls that have toil'd, and wrought, and thought with me,--

That ever with a frolic welcome took

The thunder and the sunshine, and opposed

Free hearts, free foreheads,-- you and I are old;

Old age hath yet his honor and his toil.

Death closes all; but something ere the end,

Some work of noble note, may yet be done,

Not unbecoming men that strove with Gods.

The lights begin to twinkle from the rocks;

The long day wanes; the slow moon climbs; the deep

Moans round with many voices.Come, my friends.

'T is not too late to seek a newer world.

Push off, and sitting well in order smite

The sounding furrows; for my purpose holds

To sail beyond the sunset, and the baths

Of all the western stars, until I die.

It may be that the gulfs will wash us down;

It may be we shall touch the Happy Isles,

And see the great Achilles, whom we knew.

Tho' much is taken, much abides; and tho'

We are not now that strength which in old days

Moved earth and heaven, that which we are, we are,--

One equal temper of heroic hearts,

Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will

To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.












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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

What a great poem! Such a masterpiece.
I believe this poem is about why we should save the trees: to save the world.
Tennyson, in his vivid descriptions full of emotion, is preaching to us the importance of environmental protection.
Save-A-Tree!

| Posted on 2013-09-27 | by a guest


.: :.

A poem written in dramatic monologue.The poet- Tennyson began writing of it after the death of his close friend_Arthur Hallam .

| Posted on 2012-05-13 | by a guest


.: :.

absolute load of tutti.
Alfred Lord Tennyson is a complete pudha. Whaammmm ruuuddeboiii. brap 2K12.

| Posted on 2012-04-24 | by a guest


.: :.

The last part was what Frazier quoted on his radio program for the show. It was the last scene of the last episode after 11 years and 241 shows. He gave a similar interpretation and a little more. Live life to the fullest and take the initiative (to strive) to do it. You will never be satisfied with yourself unless you try. You miss every ball you never swing at.

| Posted on 2012-03-07 | by a guest


.: :.

No need to find out the hard way that it takes no seo team and no investments to have a site analysis on a daily basis or whenever needed, but just use and you\'ll be good to go as all one can tell you about your site is already in these reports. The fun part is that you can peep on your online competitors by opening their reports also ;-) so you can have an idea of who\'s outrunning who.

| Posted on 2011-11-21 | by a guest


.: :.

This isabout a man who longs for the desire of traveling he wants to explore and learn so much he lives life to the fullest as though there is no tomorrow. He believes his wife is aging

| Posted on 2011-11-06 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem is more about living life to the fullest than anything else. I\'m sure that Tennyson had read Homer\'s epic and understood it, but this version obviously does not match with our original hero. Ulysses had the goal of getting home and nothing else, after 20 years of striving for that there is no way he\'d change his mind. Tennyson wanted to convey the idea of living life to the fullest, and there is no better hero to choose than the infamous Ulysses. To those of you wandering, this is why Tennyson wrote something that far off from the original epic.

| Posted on 2011-04-18 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem is more about living life to the fullest than anything else. I\'m sure that Tennyson had read Homer\'s epic and understood it, but this version obviously does not match with our original hero. Ulysses had the goal of getting home and nothing else, after 20 years of striving for that there is no way he\'d change his mind. Tennyson wanted to convey the idea of living life to the fullest, and there is no better hero to choose than the infamous Ulysses. To those of you wandering, this is why Tennyson wrote something that far off from the original epic.

| Posted on 2011-04-18 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem is more about living life to the fullest than anything else. I\'m sure that Tennyson had read Homer\'s epic and understood it, but this version obviously does not match with our original hero. Ulysses had the goal of getting home and nothing else, after 20 years of striving for that there is no way he\'d change his mind. Tennyson wanted to convey the idea of living life to the fullest, and there is no better hero to choose than the infamous Ulysses. To those of you wandering, this is why Tennyson wrote something that far off from the original epic.

| Posted on 2011-04-18 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem is more about living life to the fullest than anything else. I\'m sure that Tennyson had read Homer\'s epic and understood it, but this version obviously does not match with our original hero. Ulysses had the goal of getting home and nothing else, after 20 years of striving for that there is no way he\'d change his mind. Tennyson wanted to convey the idea of living life to the fullest, and there is no better hero to choose than the infamous Ulysses. To those of you wandering, this is why Tennyson wrote something that far off from the original epic.

| Posted on 2011-04-18 | by a guest


.: :.

it is true the Ulysses(Odysseus) is a king who has lives his life to the fullest however his ambition doesnt end on the beaches of troy where this poem is set. it is also apparent that his care for his crew far exceed the love he should have for his son. he seems to be an individual against society in his desires to carry on his famous tales and \'sail beyond the sunset\' this is an impossible task, clearly, which shows that he is set on doing so for the remainder of his life, hence the clarification \'until i die\'.
this is a great site btw very helpful for people writing assignments but remember dont copy, take it in and become your own person with your own views and opinions :)

| Posted on 2011-04-05 | by a guest


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i want to refer to the previous messages which say that ulysses is an awful work... please is better to shut up. ulysses is one of the best works. i am greek and i am very proud that ulysses was from ithake, greece. i know all history about ulysses and although the story of this poem is totally different it stills make me feel very good to read it because i know that it is based on the real greek version of Ulysses. so people who dont know it is better to shut up and go back to school to learn read history and literature. sorry but it is better to. f*ck u!

| Posted on 2011-02-01 | by a guest


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\"It may be we shall touch the Happy Isles,\"
I love this poem.
~Champs Ulysses Cabinatan

| Posted on 2011-01-26 | by a guest


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I\'ve read this poem at two times in my life now, when I was in college as a young man, and recently as a middle-aged professional settled into and stuck in a stolid and stifling job. I can see that this poem captures the feelings of someone old enough to have had exciting experiences, but still young enough to have energy and desire to have more. When I was young I \"shook earth and heaven\" along with my peers in my profession, computer science, back in the 80\'s. We accomplished many things in research and built systems that pushed existing technological limits, and pushed ourselves to the brink to do so. Now, though, the age of exploration and excitement is over, and I find myself a maintenance programmer, troubleshooting simple systems. There are so many parallels with Tennyson\'s Ulysses that it almost hurts to read.
Ulysses accomplished so much, and spent so much of his energy and youth in doing so. He learned things that no one else had ever seen, and he and his men pushed themselves to the limit in accomplishing their goals. Once you\'ve done things like that, once you\'ve pushed yourself to the limit, finding your limits, and still pushing, finding yourself no longer needing to do so is like becoming a rubber band no longer being stretched. The sense of let-down is fierce, and can be depressing. Ulysses shows signs of this, but his inner strength, the strength that he and his men used to get through their trials, won\'t let him succumb to depression. To use a trivial expression, he seems to be experiencing a \"mid-life crisis\".
However, unlike the pathological waste of energy that many (usually men) go through, Ulysses is wise enough to know that, while he still has strength, he can still accomplish great deeds, tempered by the understanding that they wouldn\'t be as great as the ones he and his men already accomplished. He realizes that they don\'t have to be great, but they can be true to themselves, and just because they are old, they aren\'t dead yet, they can still live lives of learning and exploring, taking a last journey for the journey\'s sake.
Ulysses also understands that he is free to do so, because his son Telemachus is ready and able to take the reins of authority from him. Ulysses also wants what\'s best for his people, and he realizes that they need someone who can rule them, not someone whose heart isn\'t truly in the endeavor. He realizes that he lacks the skills and the desire to be the leader, even as he uses disparaging words to describe those skills that Telemachus has. He acknowledges that though they are different, he does not disparage Telemachus himself, just admits that they will do things differently.
The last dozen or so lines, I once read when I was young, as depressing, a plaintive cry of defiance against the inevitable dark. Now, 30 years later, I can see it\'s a rallying cry, a shout of triumph, a call to shake off the dust of a mundane life, and try something new, learn new things, see new places, do new things, while strength remains. I\'ve been taking these passages to heart, and inspired by several men, famous and not. My brother was 50 when he went back to school and became a registered nurse. Colonel Harland Sanders was 65 when he started Kentucky Fried Chicken after many failures. Inoh Tadataka walked all over Japan making the first official modern survey of the whole country, starting when he was 50 years old. I recently started learning Japanese and have been to Japan twice now, exploring the country and learning its history and people, and I\'ve taken up photography, to try to document what I\'ve learned and seen.
If one wants to really get a lot out of this poem, read it when you\'re young, put it aside for 20 or 30 years, and read it again. I guarantee you will not see it the same way both times, and if you\'ve had the chance to do great things when young, you will feel Ulysses\' feelings in your bones.

| Posted on 2011-01-04 | by a guest


.: :.

Ulyses is old, dreaming and yearning to return to his adventures upon the sea, his an \"idle king\" with nothing to do, he calls his people \"savage race\", at the begining of the poem he is soo negative about everything and later on his attitude changes

| Posted on 2010-11-23 | by a guest


.: :.

hi! this poem tipical to understand but this comment make me comfertable in understand this bautifull poem i read,in this poem ulysses give awonderfull dicription of dictationship & ilike his way to handle his kingdom very genuin, ilike his adventure spirit to roam arround the whole world,i salute to ulysses adventures sririt that he left everything for his journy. thanking you

| Posted on 2010-10-18 | by a guest


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ulysses is the poem expressing thurst for knowledge

| Posted on 2010-10-06 | by a guest


.: :.

If Ulysses is gone then I\'m down for me and someone else to tag team his wife while she waits for him.

| Posted on 2010-09-12 | by a guest


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If Ulysses is gone then I\'m down for me and someone else to tag team his wife while she waits for him.

| Posted on 2010-09-12 | by a guest


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We may also understand the driving force of Tennyson\'s Ulysses when we place it in the context of the nineteenth century--a period of colonial expansion. Please look carefully at the images used in the poem. They are colonialist, speaking of expansion and conquer! Further, think of the attitude of the speaker towards women. The poem clearly speaks the nineteenth century English spirit.

| Posted on 2010-09-04 | by a guest


.: :.

I have seriously read Ulysses\'s heroick deed that is presented greatly by A.L.Tennyson. To me through this poem tennyson verry much express himself that is a feature of almost all poem all over the planet.

| Posted on 2010-08-22 | by a guest


.: :.

Tennyson uses the classical figure of Ulysses (Odyseus) to represent a personal journey within his own life, a spiritual voyage. The poem structure is a dramatic monologue. Tennyson uses enjambement (a run on lines) to reflect the meaning and content of the poem which is that of sailing beyond death. The speaker provides an egocentric account of his desire to travel and experience adventure rather than remaining an \'idle king.\' The reader is then introduced to his son, telemachus who will succeed Ulsses while he is travelling. We are given a half Ulysses abdication of responsibility and the role reversal between himself and his son. Ulysses goes on to accentuate the heroism of old age with his loving description of his mariners. To sum up, the poem is about defiance in the age of death, the knowledge that death is inevitable but its the moment one should live for. The poem is an alegory about mortality.

| Posted on 2010-08-14 | by a guest


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It think that this poem is great and it really helps understand the fact that once he has tried something new he doesnt want to go back to the old way of this life

| Posted on 2010-05-19 | by a guest


.: :.

Thank you all your analysis really did help me to understand this difficult poem to me
Egyptian FRiend

| Posted on 2010-05-04 | by a guest


.: :.

.Ulysses's complaint is that the king is lazy and does nothing but impose mean,unfair laws on the population. Ulysses contrasts his past and present saying how he use to travel and now he lives with his son and they work and make a steady living. He addresses the ideas of exploring and scientific inquiry because he talks about "always roaming with a hungry heart". Hope it helps.
HA

| Posted on 2010-03-22 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem is about ulysses wanting to learn and gain more knowledge by travel the world more with his companions. As well as ulysses telling his son telemachus that he is taking over his kingdom and ruling over the people of his village

| Posted on 2010-02-11 | by a guest


.: :.

People really need to not comment irrelevant shit about the poems. This site is here to help people get their opinions out on the ANALYSIS of the poems. NOT about stupid effing supermodels or people who are too stupid to understand poetry without being spoon fed by lecturers. Seriously people. Get a life.

| Posted on 2010-01-31 | by a guest


.: :.

this poem is about a man who rides his horse, and his horse is amazing. if you would give it a lick, it would taste just like raisin.

| Posted on 2010-01-22 | by a guest


.: :.

Okay, sorry, this isn't really an analysis. It's a thanks to (1) the people who cause this website to exist, and (2) the people who write seriously intended thoughts on what this poem is about, notably (but not only) the person with the sustained Tithonus comparison. People like this, all of the above, make the world a better place.
Love, Denis (dbeckett@global.co.za) -- reading Ulysses at a funeral tomorrow.

| Posted on 2009-12-07 | by a guest


.: :.

I think he is like drunk and goes out and beats his wife, i think that is what the poem is about

| Posted on 2009-09-29 | by a guest


.: :.

I LIKE THIS POEM BECAUSE OF THE TRAVELLING SPIRIT OF THE ULYSSES

| Posted on 2009-08-11 | by a guest


.: :.

I hate ulysses , i hate his son , i hate his wife ,, and i hate Salah Shrouf also
every thing is going misrabel in this university , and our teachers dont explain any thing in the class , just they talk about love and women
shit shit shit

| Posted on 2009-07-18 | by a guest


.: :.

Hello
I read thses comments . actually they are very useful
but please could anyone write the theme of this poem
thanks

| Posted on 2009-07-18 | by a guest


.: :.

Hello
I read thses comments . actually they are very useful
but please could anyone write the theme of this poem
thanks

| Posted on 2009-07-18 | by a guest


.: :.

This piece of writing is ridiculuos, not only because i'm too dumb to contemplate it, but because i gots no brains. I am 26 years of age,and make 10 million dollars a year. I work as a supermodel. i'm shameful

| Posted on 2009-07-15 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem was one of the worst I have ever read. I am 26, I have a loving family, earn 10 million dollars a year and currently work as a supermodel but this piece of extensive writing made me dpressed. For shame. (N)

| Posted on 2009-06-15 | by a guest


.: :.

hey this poem was good i love how odysseus loves his beautiful wife

| Posted on 2009-03-31 | by a guest


.: :.

Moreover, he describes himself as a ‘gray shadow’ (11) and a ‘white haired-shadow’ (8) and thus de-humanises himself in his descriptions. He also shows a separation between his past and present self such as when he says he was ‘once a man’ (11), implying he no longer human in any meaningful sense. He says his past self had ‘another heart’ (50) and that he had ‘other eyes’ (51). So, in both these poems, their self-pity is shown through the fact that they not only talk of their present woes but also because of the fact that they talk of how their previous life was so much better. Tennyson makes age the source of their self-pity.
Moreover, both the characters, Ulysses and Tithonus, try to go beyond the normal constraints of life. Ulysses wants to exert himself to such an extreme extent, as to immortalise himself in history, like a God. He shows great tenacity and says he is ‘strong in will / To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.’ (82-83) this and other references show us that he is almost compulsive in his desire to achieve paramount greatness; he says he ‘cannot rest from travel’ (6) and talks of how ‘dull it is to pause’ (24). He does not only want to stretch the boundaries of what is humanly possible, he also shows a compulsive need to achieve beyond the boundaries of age, which is expressed when he mentions his desire ‘to sail beyond the sunset’. In the same way, Tithonus wanted to be ‘none other than a God’ (14), by gaining immorality. He wanted to beat the constraints of life and become close to a deity. He showed reckless and impulsive audacity when using the rash imperative, ‘give me immortality’ (15), and this showed that he had a strong desire to break human constraints. However, he does show a change of heart after receiving the ‘gift’, as he asks, ‘why should a man desire in any way / to vary from the kindly race of men, / or pass beyond the goal of ordinance?’ (27-30). But Tennyson shows that ambition was the cause of Tithonus and Ulysses desiring to break the normal constraints of life, which in turn led to dire consequences.
In the two poems, Alfred Lord Tennyson explains the dangers of being overtly ambitious; Tithonus is used to describe the calamitous costs of what can happen when ambition rules judgment, and Ulysses is used to describe how a man can become restless and impulsive with over-ambition. Ulysses, however, describes, and to some extent celebrates the indomitable spirit of man. Although Ulysses is over-ambitious he has a strong spirit and desires to ‘drink / life to the lees’ (6-7). Tithonus, is also too ambitious, and is also irrational; however, he merely showed the perfectly natural desire to become like a God. Therefore, both the poems reflect the nature of perfectly normal humans who yearn to satiate their desire for more than what humans naturally have.

| Posted on 2009-02-09 | by a guest


.: :.

Moreover, he describes himself as a ‘gray shadow’ (11) and a ‘white haired-shadow’ (8) and thus de-humanises himself in his descriptions. He also shows a separation between his past and present self such as when he says he was ‘once a man’ (11), implying he no longer human in any meaningful sense. He says his past self had ‘another heart’ (50) and that he had ‘other eyes’ (51). So, in both these poems, their self-pity is shown through the fact that they not only talk of their present woes but also because of the fact that they talk of how their previous life was so much better. Tennyson makes age the source of their self-pity.
Moreover, both the characters, Ulysses and Tithonus, try to go beyond the normal constraints of life. Ulysses wants to exert himself to such an extreme extent, as to immortalise himself in history, like a God. He shows great tenacity and says he is ‘strong in will / To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.’ (82-83) this and other references show us that he is almost compulsive in his desire to achieve paramount greatness; he says he ‘cannot rest from travel’ (6) and talks of how ‘dull it is to pause’ (24). He does not only want to stretch the boundaries of what is humanly possible, he also shows a compulsive need to achieve beyond the boundaries of age, which is expressed when he mentions his desire ‘to sail beyond the sunset’. In the same way, Tithonus wanted to be ‘none other than a God’ (14), by gaining immorality. He wanted to beat the constraints of life and become close to a deity. He showed reckless and impulsive audacity when using the rash imperative, ‘give me immortality’ (15), and this showed that he had a strong desire to break human constraints. However, he does show a change of heart after receiving the ‘gift’, as he asks, ‘why should a man desire in any way / to vary from the kindly race of men, / or pass beyond the goal of ordinance?’ (27-30). But Tennyson shows that ambition was the cause of Tithonus and Ulysses desiring to break the normal constraints of life, which in turn led to dire consequences.
In the two poems, Alfred Lord Tennyson explains the dangers of being overtly ambitious; Tithonus is used to describe the calamitous costs of what can happen when ambition rules judgment, and Ulysses is used to describe how a man can become restless and impulsive with over-ambition. Ulysses, however, describes, and to some extent celebrates the indomitable spirit of man. Although Ulysses is over-ambitious he has a strong spirit and desires to ‘drink / life to the lees’ (6-7). Tithonus, is also too ambitious, and is also irrational; however, he merely showed the perfectly natural desire to become like a God. Therefore, both the poems reflect the nature of perfectly normal humans who yearn to satiate their desire for more than what humans naturally have.

| Posted on 2009-02-09 | by a guest


.: :.

Continued...
Moreover, he describes himself as a ‘gray shadow’ (11) and a ‘white haired-shadow’ (8) and thus de-humanises himself in his descriptions. He also shows a separation between his past and present self such as when he says he was ‘once a man’ (11), implying he no longer human in any meaningful sense. He says his past self had ‘another heart’ (50) and that he had ‘other eyes’ (51). So, in both these poems, their self-pity is shown through the fact that they not only talk of their present woes but also because of the fact that they talk of how their previous life was so much better. Tennyson makes age the source of their self-pity.
Moreover, both the characters, Ulysses and Tithonus, try to go beyond the normal constraints of life. Ulysses wants to exert himself to such an extreme extent, as to immortalise himself in history, like a God. He shows great tenacity and says he is ‘strong in will / To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.’ (82-83) this and other references show us that he is almost compulsive in his desire to achieve paramount greatness; he says he ‘cannot rest from travel’ (6) and talks of how ‘dull it is to pause’ (24). He does not only want to stretch the boundaries of what is humanly possible, he also shows a compulsive need to achieve beyond the boundaries of age, which is expressed when he mentions his desire ‘to sail beyond the sunset’. In the same way, Tithonus wanted to be ‘none other than a God’ (14), by gaining immorality. He wanted to beat the constraints of life and become close to a deity. He showed reckless and impulsive audacity when using the rash imperative, ‘give me immortality’ (15), and this showed that he had a strong desire to break human constraints. However, he does show a change of heart after receiving the ‘gift’, as he asks, ‘why should a man desire in any way / to vary from the kindly race of men, / or pass beyond the goal of ordinance?’ (27-30). But Tennyson shows that ambition was the cause of Tithonus and Ulysses desiring to break the normal constraints of life, which in turn led to dire consequences.
In the two poems, Alfred Lord Tennyson explains the dangers of being overtly ambitious; Tithonus is used to describe the calamitous costs of what can happen when ambition rules judgment, and Ulysses is used to describe how a man can become restless and impulsive with over-ambition. Ulysses, however, describes, and to some extent celebrates the indomitable spirit of man. Although Ulysses is over-ambitious he has a strong spirit and desires to ‘drink / life to the lees’ (6-7). Tithonus, is also too ambitious, and is also irrational; however, he merely showed the perfectly natural desire to become like a God. Therefore, both the poems reflect the nature of perfectly normal humans who yearn to satiate their desire for more than what humans naturally have.

| Posted on 2009-02-09 | by a guest




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