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Ozymandias Analysis



Author: Poetry of Percy Bysshe Shelley Type: Poetry Views: 7468





I met a traveller from an antique land

Who said: `Two vast and trunkless legs of stone

Stand in the desert. Near them, on the sand,

Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,

And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,

Tell that its sculptorwell those passions read

Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,

The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed.

And on the pedestal these words appear --

"My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:

Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!"

Nothing beside remains. Round the decay

Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare

The lone and level sands stretch far away.'










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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

"Look on My x Great Rock lifted on the Pyramid (Giza) failed to fall upon The Wife of Pharaoh staked and tied (2 weeks) on the sands below. Because Allah caused all the planets of the solar system and uni-verse to line up and distort-bump the falling Rock so that The Wife of Pharaoh lived. Pharaoh could not crush her in the test of Godhead. (He spiked her heart in cosmic rage)
We say nothing good about Pharaoh because Allah destroyed him--Awlaki.
.: :.
Arguably the greatest poem in the English language: The language of commerce: the language of the world that world ruled by pharaoh. On "lifeless things" and Pharaohs "work": This poem is not about Pharaoh but a woman: Shelley's poem is A graphic ode-owed to the Wife of Pharaoh stretched and staked on the sands. The big rock at the Giza pyramid compound lifted above her -to be a sacrifice to Pharaoh. Pharaohs: Usertetetemps by usury a maker of great mischief in the land abused time to desecrate his men. His colossal works stretching in the ruins of sand. (The greatest test of men is godhead: A woman won).
| Posted on 2013-07-25 | by a guest
Critique: A traveller is about time and place: in this case relaying an epic in manner by a story told "from an antique land." The antique land sold to the traveler where "an antique" made it a collectable for men endearing to them the looming lessons of two vast legs of stone standing in the desert (dwarfing men): To be "trunkless" is to be cut off -to be without support. "Near them, on the sand, Half sunk, a shattered visage lies,"… the meter is perfect where one stressed syllable breaks irregularly as does the "shattered visage" in space while two stressed syllables stand together in the march of time with each line -as one line of the poem sweeps to the next: the colossal cartouche of two vast legs of stone that stand --by the sand of time stretched far away: the living legacy of trampling men. Now "boundless and bare the lone and LEVEL sands…" The Story of Pharaoh has no time frame. It is timeless. From "Round the decay" the archaeologists cannot determine the epoch of this Pharaohs destruction.
Destruction made "bare" in Shelley's poesy by the construction of fourteen lines (Fourteen the stand of Ibrahim the Intimate of the Most Gracious) each line ten syllables. Stressed metrically is The Decalogue ( / u /Ten Commandments of the Mosaic Law) dooming Pharaoh. Pharaoh replete in ravaging men by ("the heart that fed") can be witnessed from Ozymandias by his most graphic work giving him the title by which he became (the tyrant) king of kings that is the lord of the stakes (pegs). Because he staked men on the cut trunks of palm trees (his broken statue trunkless) so that their pain and suffering was such that it formed the eruption of the base (pegs) of mountains: (plots shaking the mountains were the foundation of his pyramid-s) a stability for Pharaoh calling himself "the lord on high". .As the three sorcerers believing in the religion of Aaron and Moses replied to Pharaoh when Pharaoh threatened them with death by cutting off opposite limbs with crucifixion for taking a lord other than him: You can only touch on the world for a few numbered days. Those numbered days sands of time. By time is doom and by time is the din of timeless love. That love being in the format of a traditional Italian sonnet immortalized (the owed-ode)to the Wife of Pharaoh for her Lord. That Lord the Most Gracious to her and before- to His Intimate Ibrahim (Abraham) the witness: Walking the Valley of the Kings.
cartouche |kärˈtoō sh |
noun
a carved tablet or drawing representing a scroll with rolled-up ends, used ornamentally or bearing an inscription.
• Archaeology an oval or oblong enclosing a group of Egyptian hieroglyphs, typically representing the name and title of a monarch.
ORIGIN early 17th cent.: from French cartouche (masculine noun), earlier cartoche, from Italian cartoccio, from carta, from Latin carta, charta (see card 1 ).
--Dell'Aquila: (بسم الله الرحمن الرحيمArt meaning eagle [also meaning eagle in Ar. is the earth (ard).]--Science but the eagles soaring and peregrination): (On art)--the falcon that carried Pharaoh in war shown on (the back of) his head (with wings outspread) and military epaulet - same as modern armies today-- is the symbol (in the misuse) of technology (with the misuse of Arts and Sciences) of the rune of prophesy that plunged Pharaoh to ruin --Doom: Poets live with the prophets.
Shelley was killed in a boating accident where he was out alone on a lake at night behind his house. His body was never recovered. His son struck by lightening and too killed. Water doomed Pharaoh where Pharaoh boasted of the water that ran under his palace (all Egypt). Shelley could not escape the curse that follows pharaoh and his people in this vey life (even by the recount of A traveler). But he left for men the desolation of that destruction. And a sign for those who travel through the earth.
| Posted on 2013-08-01 | by a guest
[Allah has power over all things].

| Posted on 2013-11-18 | by a guest


.: :.

l tell u what it actually means ....the poet says that, he had met a traveler who just visited an antique land(strange land).and this traveler told him that there he noticed a statue.which was actually huge but as it vs half sunk in the sand he could only see twoo vast and trunkless legs of stone , and a face with wrinkled lip, with a sneer and he could gather from the expression or the way the statue was made that the king was very cruel , cunning and a proudy being.then he saw a pedestal ( name plate ..sorry couldnt get the right word) and it was writen that he was king Ozymadias and he called him self the king of kings.he wanted the other kings to see his achivements so that they will loose their hope.but the poet his saying that as time passed ....no one remmember this king and he looks deserted in the desert.... now the only thing that acommpanies him is the sand that lies along with it....

| Posted on 2013-10-16 | by a guest


.: :.

l tell u what it actually means ....the poet says that, he had met a traveler who just visited an antique land(strange land).and this traveler told him that there he noticed a statue.which was actually huge but as it vs half sunk in the sand he could only see twoo vast and trunkless legs of stone , and a face with wrinkled lip, with a sneer and he could gather from the expression or the way the statue was made that the king was very cruel , cunning and a proudy being.then he saw a pedestal ( name plate ..sorry couldnt get the right word) and it was writen that he was king Ozymadias and he called him self the king of kings.he wanted the other kings to see his achivements so that they will loose their hope.but the poet his saying that as time passed ....no one remmember this king and he looks deserted in the desert.... now the only thing that acommpanies him is the sand that lies along with it....

| Posted on 2013-10-16 | by a guest


.: :.

To quote SE Hinton - "Nothing Gold can Stay."
All empires rise and fall and no person at the top of the empire thinks they'll be history; they assume they will be the one writing it.

| Posted on 2013-09-09 | by a guest


.: :.

Arguably the greatest poem in the English language: The language of commerce: the language of the world that world ruled by pharaoh. On "lifeless things" and Pharaohs "work": This poem is not about Pharaoh but a woman: Shelley's poem is A graphic ode-owed to the Wife of Pharaoh stretched and staked on the sands. The big rock at the Giza pyramid compound lifted above her -to be a sacrifice to Pharaoh. Pharaohs: Usertetetemps by usury a maker of great mischief in the land abused time to desecrate his men. His colossal works stretching in the ruins of sand. (The greatest test of men is godhead: A woman won).
| Posted on 2013-07-25 | by a guest
Critique: A traveller is about time and place: in this case relaying an epic in manner by a story told "from an antique land." The antique land sold to the traveler where "an antique" made it a collectable for men endearing to them the looming lessons of two vast legs of stone standing in the desert (dwarfing men): To be "trunkless" is to be cut off -to be without support. "Near them, on the sand, Half sunk, a shattered visage lies,"… the meter is perfect where one stressed syllable breaks irregularly as does the "shattered visage" in space while two stressed syllables stand together in the march of time with each line -as one line of the poem sweeps to the next: the colossal cartouche of two vast legs of stone that stand --by the sand of time stretched far away: the living legacy of trampling men. Now "boundless and bare the lone and LEVEL sands…" The Story of Pharaoh has no time frame. It is timeless. From "Round the decay" the archaeologists cannot determine the epoch of this Pharaohs destruction.
Destruction made "bare" in Shelley's poesy by the construction of fourteen lines (Fourteen the stand of Ibrahim the Intimate of the Most Gracious) each line ten syllables. Stressed metrically is The Decalogue ( / u /Ten Commandments of the Mosaic Law) dooming Pharaoh. Pharaoh replete in ravaging men by ("the heart that fed") can be witnessed from Ozymandias by his most graphic work giving him the title by which he became (the tyrant) king of kings that is the lord of the stakes (pegs). Because he staked men on the cut trunks of palm trees (his broken statue trunkless) so that their pain and suffering was such that it formed the eruption of the base (pegs) of mountains: (plots shaking the mountains were the foundation of his pyramid-s) a stability for Pharaoh calling himself "the lord on high". .As the three sorcerers believing in the religion of Aaron and Moses replied to Pharaoh when Pharaoh threatened them with death by cutting off opposite limbs with crucifixion for taking a lord other than him: You can only touch on the world for a few numbered days. Those numbered days sands of time. By time is doom and by time is the din of timeless love. That love being in the format of a traditional Italian sonnet immortalized (the owed-ode)to the Wife of Pharaoh for her Lord. That Lord the Most Gracious to her and before- to His Intimate Ibrahim (Abraham) the witness: Walking the Valley of the Kings.
cartouche |kärˈtoō sh |
noun
a carved tablet or drawing representing a scroll with rolled-up ends, used ornamentally or bearing an inscription.
• Archaeology an oval or oblong enclosing a group of Egyptian hieroglyphs, typically representing the name and title of a monarch.
ORIGIN early 17th cent.: from French cartouche (masculine noun), earlier cartoche, from Italian cartoccio, from carta, from Latin carta, charta (see card 1 ).
--Dell'Aquila: (بسم الله الرحمن الرحيمArt meaning eagle [also meaning eagle in Ar. is the earth (ard).]--Science but the eagles soaring and peregrination): (On art)--the falcon that carried Pharaoh in war shown on (the back of) his head (with wings outspread) and military epaulet - same as modern armies today-- is the symbol (in the misuse) of technology (with the misuse of Arts and Sciences) of the rune of prophesy that plunged Pharaoh to ruin --Doom: Poets live with the prophets.
Shelley was killed in a boating accident where he was out alone on a lake at night behind his house. His body was never recovered. His son struck by lightening and too killed. Water doomed Pharaoh where Pharaoh boasted of the water that ran under his palace (all Egypt). Shelley could not escape the curse that follows pharaoh and his people in this vey life (even by the recount of A traveler). But he left for men the desolation of that destruction. And a sign for those who travel through the earth.

| Posted on 2013-08-01 | by a guest


.: :.

Arguably the greatest poem in the English language: The language of commerce: the language of the world that world ruled by pharaoh. On "lifeless things" and Pharaohs "work": This poem is not about Pharaoh but a woman: Shelley's poem is A graphic ode-owed to the Wife of Pharaoh stretched and staked on the sands. The big rock at the Giza pyramid compound lifted above her -to be a sacrifice to Pharaoh. Pharaohs: Usertetetemps by usury a maker of great mischief in the land abused time to desecrate his men. His colossal works stretching in the ruins of sand. (The greatest test of men is godhead: A woman won).

| Posted on 2013-07-25 | by a guest


.: :.

I am a middle school student of the sixtth grade.. This poem is saying how can you be all high and mighty if your just a head in the sand.

| Posted on 2013-06-02 | by a guest


.: :.

Here in this poem, the poet tells that he met a traveller from an antique land, which actually refers to Egypt. the traveller says: Two vast trunkless legs of stone stand in the desert and near them a visage lies, which has a sneer(one-sided smile)on it. this shows that the person of whom yhe statue was, was cruel and unkind.
Next, he says that the sculptor read those passions well which yet survive. This shows that the sculptor knew the person\'s habits, behaviour, etc. The words on the pedestal- \"My name is Ozymandias, the king of kings. Look on my works, ye mighty and despair!\" tell that the statue was of a king called Ozymandias who was boasting himself. The king tells other kings to look on to his achievements and by doig this, they will definitely lose all hopes. The poet tells even though the time has passed, the pride of the king has not vanished. There is nothing beside it, only sand and sand....

| Posted on 2013-01-13 | by a guest


.: :.

my name is Faiq
Shelley wants to describes that Human beings are mortal

| Posted on 2012-12-11 | by a guest


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It is understandable that money makes us disembarrass. But how to act if somebody has no money? The one way is to receive the business loans or college loan.

| Posted on 2012-12-11 | by a guest


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Here is one word to think about in terms of the poem, if you take the Burke\'s and Tom Cochrane\'s views and think about it in terms of the poem. Sublime.

| Posted on 2012-11-23 | by a guest


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can a person immrtalised himself through money and power?
this is the topic for the declamation. please help me!

| Posted on 2012-11-19 | by a guest


.: :.

.: :.
our power well not stay forever... so we care for it... don\'t be shellfish
| Posted on 2010-05-04 | by a guest
Dear the person who wrote this, I vow I\'ll try my hardest no to be a shellfish

| Posted on 2012-09-16 | by a guest


.: :.

nobody cares about the egypitain pharaoh so just quit at life.

| Posted on 2012-04-27 | by a guest


.: :.

the hand that mock is for the people who remembered the tyranny of the king while the heart that fed is those people who appreciated the statue which is the work of art. rex valdez

| Posted on 2012-02-26 | by a guest


.: :.

ozy is a greek word for air and mandias is a greek word for king so basically ozymandias is the king of air, or in other words kind of nothing

| Posted on 2012-01-15 | by a guest


.: :.

The poem is written by the great poet P.B. Shelley. It is an Italian sonnet comprising of an octave and a sestet, with octave representing the immense pride and majesty whereas sestet its resolution.
The central theme of the poem is the complete and inevitable decline of all leaders and of the empire they build, however mighty in their own time. The statue of Ramses II in the British museum is thought to have inspired the poem. Ozymandias was another name for Ramses the great, pharaoh of the 19th century of ancient Egypt.
Highlighting the excessive pride and disastrous downfall of man, Shelley condenses the history of civilization through the use of metaphor of rise, peak and fall of ozymandias. He shows that all the works of human kind including social structure will eventually become history. He establishes the theme, Nothing Lasts by using specific imagery, speaker voices and by contrasting this fact with the idea that some things stand the test of time. Shelley conveys a tone of greatness and power associated with the ones mighty statue and the civilization and king for which it stood, yet at the same time shows how this prominent ode to power crumbled at the hands of time. He uses situational irony to deliver his message that power over the period of time fades as do the accomplishment associated with it even for the most powerful of men. In contrast, the poet asserts that some things like art do remain after the effect read, which yet survived on these lifeless things. Even after the destruction of the statue, its craftsmanship is still apparent and the skill of artisan must have been great indeed to capture the emotion of a man so intoxicated by power. Shelley wants us to see beyond the greatness of the king for which the statue was erected and appreciate the beauty of the thing itself. Various poetic devices have been used in this poem.

| Posted on 2011-11-26 | by a guest


.: :.

Percy Bysshe Shelleys poem Ozymandias demonstrates a theme of permanence. The story is hearsay to the speaker, and his enthusiasm to further share the story will only continue its eternalness. The imagery of the statue itself, its destruction and the unaffected pedestal further expand on the everlasting qualities of the monument. The prolonged existence of the fable and the expansiveness of the desert on a timeless and vast earth prove the solidity of Ozymandias and everything he leaves behind.
The persona of the poem seems as though he is passing on an interesting story to a fellow traveler, much like he himself experienced in his exploration. The speaker met a traveler from an antique land which sparked the entire discussion of the ruined statue. The persona did not personally experience this spectacle, yet can recall word for word the detailed imagery of the ruins. Not only does this show how enthralling the description was to the speaker, but how eager he was to inform others of the statues presence. The theme of permanence is well developed because the reader must assume that the story will only continue to be spread, a legend for all interested in hearing it.
A statue is a fantastic image for permanence. It was originally constructed by a tyrant king to glorify himself, yet constructed in a manner that discredits him. The frown and wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command are obvious examples of negative emotion. The sculptor was inspired by Ozymandias in life, and the result is a proper depiction of his personality even in death. Before the statue was destroyed, it was a representation of the kings presumed permanence, and the details of his demeanor are undyingly expressed. It is impossible to know whether the effigy was abandoned and eroded without attention or forcefully destroyed by the resentful subjects of Ozymandias; however, either option proves that the feelings of the subjects towards their leader are eternal, inflicting irreversible damage.
The status of the monument is described in the poem in abundant detail, adding to the theme even further. Phrases like trunkless legs, shattered visage, and colossal wreck stick in the readers mind like glue. Though the crushed statue seemingly contradicts the theme, the durability is not of importance. The permanence lies within the human emotion surrounding Ozymandias. The hand that mocked and heart that fed cannot actually be seen on an unalterable sculpture, yet they are still mentioned. The legend of the tyrannous ruler overshadows the visual representation of Ozymandias, and the traveler cannot distinguish his previous knowledge from the actual visual. This shows that the effects of arrogance and cruelty are also everlasting, even though the state of the statue was not.
Most importantly, the attached placard is intact, which reads: My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings: Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair! This arrogant attitude, straight from the mouth of the king himself, unfolds a completely different kind of permanence: his legacy. Though these words are not a positive reflection, they are accurate and indestructible, contrary to the condition of the rest of the statue.
The longevity of the legend is vital to the understanding of the theme. Thousands of years have passed since the construction of the monument at the time it is reported to the speaker of the poem, but still it remains. Though not intact, Ozymandias effigy continues to be a source of information for travelers and historians to understand the era of his domain, and his character. The legacy of the king outlasts his life, his monument, and survives to be shared by people centuries after his reign.
Though the lone and level sands stretch far away from the wreckage, it is there to be seen, and has been, by a transient traveler. Nothing beside remains, yet the legacy lives on. It is interesting enough to tell to a passing acquaintance and vivid enough to describe in magnificent detail. It is obvious that no amount of decay, time, or distance can destroy the permanence of the statue, and everything it represents historically and emotionally. Ozymandias, with the use of distinct imagery and evocative emotions, develops a theme of permanence. Interestingly enough, the poem itself further correlates with the theme. The poet lived during the late 1700s and early 1800s, yet his poetry is analyzed and cherished two hundred years later. Shelley has proven his own solidity in the world of literature, and has furthered the permanence of Ozymandias, the fabled king, by informing poetry buffs and students alike of his existence.Percy Bysshe Shelleys poem Ozymandias demonstrates a theme of permanence. The story is hearsay to the speaker, and his enthusiasm to further share the story will only continue its eternalness. The imagery of the statue itself, its destruction and the unaffected pedestal further expand on the everlasting qualities of the monument. The prolonged existence of the fable and the expansiveness of the desert on a timeless and vast earth prove the solidity of Ozymandias and everything he leaves behind.
The persona of the poem seems as though he is passing on an interesting story to a fellow traveler, much like he himself experienced in his exploration. The speaker met a traveler from an antique land which sparked the entire discussion of the ruined statue. The persona did not personally experience this spectacle, yet can recall word for word the detailed imagery of the ruins. Not only does this show how enthralling the description was to the speaker, but how eager he was to inform others of the statues presence. The theme of permanence is well developed because the reader must assume that the story will only continue to be spread, a legend for all interested in hearing it.
A statue is a fantastic image for permanence. It was originally constructed by a tyrant king to glorify himself, yet constructed in a manner that discredits him. The frown and wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command are obvious examples of negative emotion. The sculptor was inspired by Ozymandias in life, and the result is a proper depiction of his personality even in death. Before the statue was destroyed, it was a representation of the kings presumed permanence, and the details of his demeanor are undyingly expressed. It is impossible to know whether the effigy was abandoned and eroded without attention or forcefully destroyed by the resentful subjects of Ozymandias; however, either option proves that the feelings of the subjects towards their leader are eternal, inflicting irreversible damage.
The status of the monument is described in the poem in abundant detail, adding to the theme even further. Phrases like trunkless legs, shattered visage, and colossal wreck stick in the readers mind like glue. Though the crushed statue seemingly contradicts the theme, the durability is not of importance. The permanence lies within the human emotion surrounding Ozymandias. The hand that mocked and heart that fed cannot actually be seen on an unalterable sculpture, yet they are still mentioned. The legend of the tyrannous ruler overshadows the visual representation of Ozymandias, and the traveler cannot distinguish his previous knowledge from the actual visual. This shows that the effects of arrogance and cruelty are also everlasting, even though the state of the statue was not.
Most importantly, the attached placard is intact, which reads: My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings: Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair! This arrogant attitude, straight from the mouth of the king himself, unfolds a completely different kind of permanence: his legacy. Though these words are not a positive reflection, they are accurate and indestructible, contrary to the condition of the rest of the statue.
The longevity of the legend is vital to the understanding of the theme. Thousands

| Posted on 2011-11-05 | by a guest


.: :.

Percy Bysshe Shelleys poem Ozymandias demonstrates a theme of permanence. The story is hearsay to the speaker, and his enthusiasm to further share the story will only continue its eternalness. The imagery of the statue itself, its destruction and the unaffected pedestal further expand on the everlasting qualities of the monument. The prolonged existence of the fable and the expansiveness of the desert on a timeless and vast earth prove the solidity of Ozymandias and everything he leaves behind.
The persona of the poem seems as though he is passing on an interesting story to a fellow traveler, much like he himself experienced in his exploration. The speaker met a traveler from an antique land which sparked the entire discussion of the ruined statue. The persona did not personally experience this spectacle, yet can recall word for word the detailed imagery of the ruins. Not only does this show how enthralling the description was to the speaker, but how eager he was to inform others of the statues presence. The theme of permanence is well developed because the reader must assume that the story will only continue to be spread, a legend for all interested in hearing it.
A statue is a fantastic image for permanence. It was originally constructed by a tyrant king to glorify himself, yet constructed in a manner that discredits him. The frown and wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command are obvious examples of negative emotion. The sculptor was inspired by Ozymandias in life, and the result is a proper depiction of his personality even in death. Before the statue was destroyed, it was a representation of the kings presumed permanence, and the details of his demeanor are undyingly expressed. It is impossible to know whether the effigy was abandoned and eroded without attention or forcefully destroyed by the resentful subjects of Ozymandias; however, either option proves that the feelings of the subjects towards their leader are eternal, inflicting irreversible damage.
The status of the monument is described in the poem in abundant detail, adding to the theme even further. Phrases like trunkless legs, shattered visage, and colossal wreck stick in the readers mind like glue. Though the crushed statue seemingly contradicts the theme, the durability is not of importance. The permanence lies within the human emotion surrounding Ozymandias. The hand that mocked and heart that fed cannot actually be seen on an unalterable sculpture, yet they are still mentioned. The legend of the tyrannous ruler overshadows the visual representation of Ozymandias, and the traveler cannot distinguish his previous knowledge from the actual visual. This shows that the effects of arrogance and cruelty are also everlasting, even though the state of the statue was not.
Most importantly, the attached placard is intact, which reads: My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings: Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair! This arrogant attitude, straight from the mouth of the king himself, unfolds a completely different kind of permanence: his legacy. Though these words are not a positive reflection, they are accurate and indestructible, contrary to the condition of the rest of the statue.
The longevity of the legend is vital to the understanding of the theme. Thousands of years have passed since the construction of the monument at the time it is reported to the speaker of the poem, but still it remains. Though not intact, Ozymandias effigy continues to be a source of information for travelers and historians to understand the era of his domain, and his character. The legacy of the king outlasts his life, his monument, and survives to be shared by people centuries after his reign.
Though the lone and level sands stretch far away from the wreckage, it is there to be seen, and has been, by a transient traveler. Nothing beside remains, yet the legacy lives on. It is interesting enough to tell to a passing acquaintance and vivid enough to describe in magnificent detail. It is obvious that no amount of decay, time, or distance can destroy the permanence of the statue, and everything it represents historically and emotionally. Ozymandias, with the use of distinct imagery and evocative emotions, develops a theme of permanence. Interestingly enough, the poem itself further correlates with the theme. The poet lived during the late 1700s and early 1800s, yet his poetry is analyzed and cherished two hundred years later. Shelley has proven his own solidity in the world of literature, and has furthered the permanence of Ozymandias, the fabled king, by informing poetry buffs and students alike of his existence.

| Posted on 2011-11-05 | by a guest


.: :.

ozymandias is a gr8 poem nd it also shows dt tym seeks to destroy everythin..

| Posted on 2011-11-03 | by a guest


.: :.

as a revolutionary poet, shelly leads his readers to revolutionary thoughts... we can say poetry -art on word- will live 4ever than the art on stone which will be crumbled by time and history.but a question hunts \'whose hand it refers...(the hand that..) the kings or the sculptors?
anne

| Posted on 2011-10-26 | by a guest


.: :.

.MODERATED MY BOOTY. ONLY BOOTY WARRIORS CAN MODERATE ME, AND I DON'T SEE NONE AROUND HERE.. BOOOTAY! THAT IS ALL--WAIT! THERE'S MORE! Picky picky picky peppers ate your mom. THE END!

| Posted on 2011-05-15 | by a guest


.: :.

\'Ozymandias\' is a poem written by Shelley in which he attempts to highlight the true value of language and poetry. Ozymandias makes the point that language has an immortality, whereas the statue of Ozymandias is a \'half sunk\' and \'a shattered visage\' of the power and complete control it once embodied. All that is left are the words \'Now look upon my works, ye Mighty, and despair\', and the speaker makes it clear that \'nothing beside remains\' apart from these words. Whilst the power of the \'king of kings\' has \'decayed\', language is the only survivor. Shelley was a firm believer in the \'higher value\' of poetry in comparison to other art forms; this is evident in his essay \'A Defense of Poetry\' in which he states that \'words are a more direct representation of the actions and passions of our internal being and is susceptible of mor various and delicate combinations....than any other art form\'. It is for this reason that Shelley also asserted \'all high poetry is infinite...durable, universal and permanant\'. We can apply this to Ozymandias; whilst the King believed his presence and authority was infinite, his statue is merely a crumbling relic. Shelley however, in creating Ozymandias in literature has immortalized himself.

| Posted on 2011-05-15 | by a guest


.: :.

MODERATED MY BOOTY. ONLY BOOTY WARRIORS CAN MODERATE ME, AND I DON\'T SEE NONE AROUND HERE.. BOOOTAY! THAT IS ALL--WAIT! THERE\'S MORE! Picky picky picky peppers ate your mom. THE END!

| Posted on 2011-05-05 | by a guest


.: :.

JUST SO YOU KNOW IM BEING KEYLOGGED. HAHAHAHAH. THAt\'s a joke. Just kidding. I\'m not being keylogged. Nother tactic to avoid keylogging

| Posted on 2011-05-05 | by a guest


.: :.

I am 12 yeers old and i why is teh man in a dessert?

| Posted on 2011-03-21 | by a guest


.: :.

I was asked to write an essay comparing this poem (Ozymandias) with \'When I have fears that I may cease to be\' (look it up).
I guess in both of them there is someone that express his feelings by creating something!

| Posted on 2011-03-16 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem relates a lot of problems with time. . . YEAH BOY!

| Posted on 2011-01-11 | by a guest


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I have to say when i recieved this poem for a project in English i was not stoked, but after reading this i actually find myself enjoying it. It has quite a bit of meaning behind its words. I thought it was a bunch of nonsense. I guess not! haha =D

| Posted on 2011-01-06 | by a guest


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I read and learned about this poem in school. The meaning is strong but it\'s said in a veary hard-to-understand way. It shows how even the most mighty and powerful peopple and places can get defeated by time. The reason we learned about this is becaudse we are reading \"The Tripod Triligy\" which a charchter\'s name is Azimandias. In this book Tripods take over, it takes place in the future. This shows even the most powerful countries like America were defeated by time.

| Posted on 2010-11-23 | by a guest


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By contrasting the wishes of Ozymandians,i.e.,to be remembered, feared and respected for ever,with the lonely and useless ruin of the statue, the poet foregrounds the idea of the vanity of human wishes.
Yideg

| Posted on 2010-10-29 | by a guest


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By contrasting the wishes of Ozymandians,i.e.,to be remembered, feared and respected for ever,with the lonely and useless ruin of the statue, the poet foregrounds the idea of the vanity of human wishes.
Yideg

| Posted on 2010-10-29 | by a guest


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discourses evident include that of power and time.

| Posted on 2010-10-25 | by a guest


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This is among the best poems in the English language. A masterpiece. I wish everyone who loved art would read this poem, give it consideration. I think it would revive people\'s love for the meter, tone, and style of pre-pomo poetry. To understand this kind of sculpted beauty. Magnificent.

| Posted on 2010-10-22 | by a guest


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What is the aswer to thiss?? With close reference to \"Ozymandias\" by Percy B. Shelly show how he very clearly gives the message that no one lasts forever, even the mightiest of men die and are forgotten

| Posted on 2010-10-07 | by a guest


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Im in 8 grade the poem is amazing shelly wants to tell us about autocracy.

| Posted on 2010-09-08 | by a guest


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the title is also significant.
ozy is a greek word meaning air, myndias is also a greek term meaning king. so, ozymandias means the king of air or in other words the king of nothing. his name shows his power is temperory.
cheers
salman khattak.

| Posted on 2010-07-28 | by a guest


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ozymanias was a mighty king he was so proud of himself but life show him that this state will not be for ever one day come and he will die too and no one will remind him look u r left in desert and nothing left just two hands and legs and every human is mortal.
thanx :kany

| Posted on 2010-06-13 | by a guest


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ozymanias was a mighty king he was so proud of himself but life show him that this state will not be for ever one day come and he will die too and no one will remind him look u r left in desert and nothing left just two hands and legs and every human is mortal.
thanx :kany

| Posted on 2010-06-13 | by a guest


.: :.

ozymanias was a mighty king he was so proud of himselfs but life show him that this state not be for ever one day come and u will die too and no onw will remind u look u r left in desert and nothing left just two hands and legs and every human is mortal
thanx :kany

| Posted on 2010-06-13 | by a guest




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