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Now Sleeps the Crimson Petal Analysis



Author: Poetry of Alfred, Lord Tennyson Type: Poetry Views: 1593

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NOW sleeps the crimson petal, now the white;

Nor waves the cypress in the palace walk;

Nor winks the gold fin in the porphyry font:

The fire-fly wakens: waken thou with me.



Now droops the milkwhite peacock like a ghost,

And like a ghost she glimmers on to me.



Now lies the Earth all DanaŽ to the stars,

And all thy heart lies open unto me.



Now slides the silent meteor on, and leaves

A shining furrow, as thy thoughts in me.



Now folds the lily all her sweetness up,

And slips into the bosom of the lake:

So fold thyself, my dearest, thou, and slip

Into my bosom and be lost in me.





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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

The first stanza Lord Tennyson wrote is one which frames the scene for the rest of the poem. The crimson and white petals are presumably references to flowers in the garden, and the petals are losing their vibrant colors to the impeding shadows. The cypress not waving in the palace walk is to show the absolute stillness of the air around the palace, and adds to the feeling of nightfall bringing tranquility onto the scene. ďThe firefly wakens, waken thou with me,Ē solidifies the nighttime scene in the mind of the reader, and finishes setting up the scene upon which the rest of the poem is based upon. The only rhyme set in place throughout the poem is the repetition of the word ďme,Ē at the end of each stanza. Each stanza is written in seemingly free verse, the first stanza being no exception.
The second stanza focuses on the white peacock outside that is settling in for the night, and Lord Tennyson uses a simile to compare the bird to a ghost, to explain the peacocks silhouette-like appearance.
The third stanza uses a metaphor to say that the earth is surrounded by (imprisoned by) the starry night sky. The second part of the stanza is stating that speakerís lover is opening up her heart to him as the night moves along.
The fourth stanza describes a meteor and how its shining trail in the sky mirrors a shining trail that the speakerís lover leaves in his heart.
The fifth, and final, stanza uses the image of a water lily folding its petals in to keep the dark at bay as an indirect metaphor for the speakerís lover, when he asks her to fold herself in to his chest, seemingly like the lily, and fall off to sleep right there.
Some of the other articles I have read seemed to have referenced to sexual annotations Tennyson included in his poem, like the reference to Danae, and the furrow left by the meteor.

| Posted on 2010-02-04 | by a guest


.: :.



NOW sleeps the crimson petal, now the white;
Nor waves the cypress in the palace walk;
Nor winks the gold fin in the porphyry font:
The fire-fly wakens: waken thou with me.

Now droops the milkwhite peacock like a ghost,
And like a ghost she glimmers on to me.

Now lies the Earth all DanaŽ to the stars,
And all thy heart lies open unto me.

Now slides the silent meteor on, and leaves
A shining furrow, as thy thoughts in me.

Now folds the lily all her sweetness up,
And slips into the bosom of the lake:
So fold thyself, my dearest, thou, and slip
Into my bosom and be lost in me.

| Posted on 2007-10-26 | by a guest




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