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The Bells Analysis



Author: Poetry of Edgar Allan Poe Type: Poetry Views: 4914





I



Hear the sledges with the bells-

Silver bells!

What a world of merriment their melody foretells!

How they tinkle, tinkle, tinkle,

In the icy air of night!

While the stars that oversprinkle

All the heavens, seem to twinkle

With a crystalline delight;

Keeping time, time, time,

In a sort of Runic rhyme,

To the tintinnabulation that so musically wells

From the bells, bells, bells, bells,

Bells, bells, bells-

From the jingling and the tinkling of the bells.



II



Hear the mellow wedding bells,

Golden bells!

What a world of happiness their harmony foretells!

Through the balmy air of night

How they ring out their delight!

From the molten-golden notes,

And an in tune,

What a liquid ditty floats

To the turtle-dove that listens, while she gloats

On the moon!

Oh, from out the sounding cells,

What a gush of euphony voluminously wells!

How it swells!

How it dwells

On the Future! how it tells

Of the rapture that impels

To the swinging and the ringing

Of the bells, bells, bells,

Of the bells, bells, bells,bells,

Bells, bells, bells-

To the rhyming and the chiming of the bells!



III



Hear the loud alarum bells-

Brazen bells!

What a tale of terror, now, their turbulency tells!

In the startled ear of night

How they scream out their affright!

Too much horrified to speak,

They can only shriek, shriek,

Out of tune,

In a clamorous appealing to the mercy of the fire,

In a mad expostulation with the deaf and frantic fire,

Leaping higher, higher, higher,

With a desperate desire,

And a resolute endeavor,

Now- now to sit or never,

By the side of the pale-faced moon.

Oh, the bells, bells, bells!

What a tale their terror tells

Of Despair!

How they clang, and clash, and roar!

What a horror they outpour

On the bosom of the palpitating air!

Yet the ear it fully knows,

By the twanging,

And the clanging,

How the danger ebbs and flows:

Yet the ear distinctly tells,

In the jangling,

And the wrangling,

How the danger sinks and swells,

By the sinking or the swelling in the anger of the bells-

Of the bells-

Of the bells, bells, bells,bells,

Bells, bells, bells-

In the clamor and the clangor of the bells!



IV



Hear the tolling of the bells-

Iron Bells!

What a world of solemn thought their monody compels!

In the silence of the night,

How we shiver with affright

At the melancholy menace of their tone!

For every sound that floats

From the rust within their throats

Is a groan.

And the people- ah, the people-

They that dwell up in the steeple,

All Alone

And who, tolling, tolling, tolling,

In that muffled monotone,

Feel a glory in so rolling

On the human heart a stone-

They are neither man nor woman-

They are neither brute nor human-

They are Ghouls:

And their king it is who tolls;

And he rolls, rolls, rolls,

Rolls

A paean from the bells!

And his merry bosom swells

With the paean of the bells!

And he dances, and he yells;

Keeping time, time, time,

In a sort of Runic rhyme,

To the paean of the bells-

Of the bells:

Keeping time, time, time,

In a sort of Runic rhyme,

To the throbbing of the bells-

Of the bells, bells, bells-

To the sobbing of the bells;

Keeping time, time, time,

As he knells, knells, knells,

In a happy Runic rhyme,

To the rolling of the bells-

Of the bells, bells, bells:

To the tolling of the bells,

Of the bells, bells, bells, bells-

Bells, bells, bells-

To the moaning and the groaning of the bells.








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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

Edgar Allen Poe;s poem was soo good I wish I could have met him and mariied him

| Posted on 2012-10-24 | by a guest


.: :.

I finally understand that this poem is about the journey of one\'s life

| Posted on 2012-08-31 | by a guest


.: :.

this poem is very good and it is not vaag. it isnt dull and it brings out the best of poems. oh.and i like puding. ilike pudding.I LIKE CHEESE DOODLES

| Posted on 2012-05-24 | by a guest


.: :.

x taco taco taco taco taco taco :):):):):):):):):)

| Posted on 2012-05-24 | by a guest


.: :.

x taco taco taco taco taco taco :):):):):):):):):)

| Posted on 2012-05-24 | by a guest


.: :.

this poem is very good and it is not vaag. it isnt dull and it brings out the best of poems. oh.and i like puding. ilike pudding.I LIKE CHEESE DOODLES

| Posted on 2012-05-24 | by a guest


.: :.

the first stanza represents the new beginings of a life. The innocence and the happiness of life.
the second stanza represents the joys of marrage. Finally being with someone who you care deeply about.
the last stanza represents death lingering above you. Waiting till your heart stops and you soul gets taken away from you.

| Posted on 2012-04-23 | by a guest


.: :.

I believe that this poem is talking about poes experiences as a child. He was happy at first ( just as the mood is happy at the beginning of the tale ) . then as he grew older ( as most people do ) he began to become old and he was unhappy with himself . Poe if you remember was a dreary man. And his way of venting his feelings was through poetry. Poe made it pretty difficult in some of his deep poems for people to understand. People as a result proclaimed him crazy. He wasnt crazy. He was just misunderstood.
If you wish me to prove this poem is about growing up , it says in segment two about wedding bells. The wedding bells represent his marriage. He states \" oh the future how it tells \" if you remember in the raven , the woman died. Everybody assums it was a cousin. So i think he is forshadowing a little for us there. the bells mean the happy times. Then he mentions in part three the loud bells. That could refer to horrers and deaths ect that happen as you grow older. \" only the human heart a stone \" could imply that he fell out of love and the marriage ended badly . The bells in the end ended up annoying. Just like life. He thought twords the end of the poem life was a waste of time.
- Danielle Age 16 usa

| Posted on 2012-04-15 | by a guest


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I feel as the poem speaks about the evoulition of the Earth along side with the evoulition of the Human Race. In the first section, there are no humans and the earth is perfect. The section talks about how humans were first brought on Earth, but they were peaceful and pure. The third section speaks about humans today, and they have grown evil, and unpre. The fourth section speaks about the earth and the humans in the future. I think it means, the humans have grown so accustomed to evil and warfare, that they wiped themselves out.
-Kaleb G. Badon Age 13

| Posted on 2012-03-11 | by a guest


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I believe that Poe is speaking as the bells. Almost translating their ringing. In the beginning he speaks like light, high pitched, silver bells. Ex. Tinkling. As the poem progresses, the bells get heavier, as his diction does.

| Posted on 2012-03-01 | by a guest


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To me the bells represents events in life. For example in the 1st stanza Poe states that silver bells means your a child waiting for that christmas miracle. In the 2nd stanza he talks about golden bells as in representing marriage,weddings,and happily spending the rest of your life with a loved one. In the 3rd stanza brazen bells represents a scared shriek of terror or howling shock of death. In the last stanza Poe quotes iron bells as a sign of funerals[as in wearing black to a ceremony of a passed loved one.]
This is what I believe the bells by Poe represents.
M.C. PERIOD 3

| Posted on 2011-12-05 | by a guest


.: :.

To me the bells represents events in life. For example in the 1st stanza Poe states that silver bells means your a child waiting for that christmas miracle. In the 2nd stanza he talks about golden bells as in representing marriage,weddings,and happily spending the rest of your life with a loved one. In the 3rd stanza brazen bells represents a scared shriek of terror or howling shock of death. In the last stanza Poe quotes iron bells as a sign of funerals[as in wearing black to a ceremony of a passed loved one.]
This is what I believe the bells by Poe represents.
M.C. PERIOD 3

| Posted on 2011-12-05 | by a guest


.: :.

To me the bells represents events in life. For example in the 1st stanza Poe states that silver bells means your a child waiting for that christmas miracle. In the 2nd stanza he talks about golden bells as in representing marriage,weddings,and happily spending the rest of your life with a loved one. In the 3rd stanza brazen bells represents a scared shriek of terror or howling shock of death. In the last stanza Poe quotes iron bells as a sign of funerals[as in wearing black to a ceremony of a passed loved one.]
This is what I believe the bells by Poe represents.
M.C. PERIOD 3

| Posted on 2011-12-05 | by a guest


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I belive the central message on \"the bels\" is the differnt stages of life starting with the begianing of life to being maried as an adult to being faced with him or a family member being diagnosed with tuberculosis to the death of the tuberculosis. The central message to me is about living your life to the fullest until you do die weather it be from sickness or from olden age.=D
Written by: A.R-T(6th period)

| Posted on 2011-11-16 | by a guest


.: :.

D.D.I.T.T.S. (cm)
The Bells
Diction :
The 1st two stanzas -Have positive words which lead to a happy tone
The last two stanzas - Have negative word choice leads to melancholy tone in final stanza.
Devices :
Entire poem is a metaphor.Poe uses simile.
Imagery :
Auditory & Visual
Technique :
Alliteration, Internal Rhyme
Tone :
Changes through the poem .
Speaker/cm :
The speaker is Edgar poe and the central message is bells

| Posted on 2011-11-11 | by TAT


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I believe the poem was about the stages of life. Referring to the first stanza; Poe uses silver bells to what I think is symbolizing childhood. He writes the line \"What a world of merriment their melody foretells!\" Describing the cheerful moments of being a kid! The second stanza uses golden bells. Wedding bells! The time when love is in the air. I think Poe is trying to let the readers know the excitement of a wedding itself. These first two stanza\'s are keeping a happy tone. In the third stanza however, the cheerful and excitement drifts into terror. How the bells become out of tune and don\'t create a soothing sound any longer. And in the last stanza Poe talks about the Iron bells which seems to change the tone into sorrow. Referencing to someone dying. He mentions The king of ghouls. What I think is the king of death. An example could be the Green Reaper, casting the end of the poem into really a great ending. This whole poem could possibly be about his wife. But some things don\'t add up. All together my opinion of this poem is really wonderful!!!
H.E.S 3rd period

| Posted on 2011-11-06 | by a guest


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in the poem the bells i think that when the author states the differnt types of bells that each bell means something differnt. for example the sound of the silver bells could mean the sound and feelings of people that a new baby has just been born. when he titles the poem \"the bells\" i think he means the sound of each bell when some type of event has happebed whether it is a birth a marrige a death or whatever this all leads to the central message of the poem
AMC period 6

| Posted on 2011-11-06 | by a guest


.: :.

in the poem the bells i think that when the author states the differnt types of bells that each bell means something differnt. for example the sound of the silver bells could mean the sound and feelings of people that a new baby has just been born. when he titles the poem \"the bells\" i think he means the sound of each bell when some type of event has happebed whether it is a birth a marrige a death or whatever this all leads to the central message of the poem

| Posted on 2011-11-06 | by a guest


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I think that this poem is a poem that has different meanings to every person. I think one of the things it could be about is Poe\'s life. as the poem starts out, hes happy at his young age. As he gets older, he gets married and he has very much joy, but then things start to go downhill. Everything starts to get more obnoxious, and there are more problems in his life. By the fourth stanza, it is kind of depressing, and in his mind, there isn\'t much to live for. In another way, it could be about the seasons, starting out with Spring and ending with Winter, of course. In the Spring season, everything is blooming and everything just seems very joyful, same as in the first stanza, (besides the blooming). Then comes the Summer season and everything is still happy, but also a decent amount of weddings happen during this season, hence the \"mellow wedding bells\". Then comes Fall. The temperature starts dropping and seems aren\'t as perky, you could say. Things aren\'t really all that happy and fun. And the last season being Winter comes along and it is so cold outside and things are kind of mopey/ depressing. The same as in the poem. this is all just my opinion, but I have done Socratic Seminars and everybody seemed to have a different of view on it.
-H.R.W.

| Posted on 2011-11-04 | by a guest


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The central message of the poem \"The Bells\" by Edgar Allen Poe is that you can take any common object and make it worth meaning and even use it to explain different life situations like Poe did. He used words like chiming, tinkling, and ditty in the first and second stanzas to show joy and happiness. In the third stanza he used words such as shriek, horiffied, and clamor to express a scarier tone. In the fourth stanza he said iron bells and used that as a metaphor to death. Poe used at least one metaphor in every stanza. It\'s in the first lines. The first stanzxa begins with \"Hear the sledges with the bells, Silver bells\" and when you think of silver bells you think of a light little chime and it sounds happy. This is like the second stanza except he says, \"Hear the mellow wedding bells, golden bells\" And gold is supposed to last forever like marriage. Then the final stanza starts off with saying \"Hear the tolling of the bells, Iron bells\". Edgar uses auditory image in every stanza too when he uses words like, chiming, tinbkling, clangor, clash to describe the different tones of the bells in each verse. I could really hear the bells as I read it.
C.W. Period 6

| Posted on 2011-11-04 | by a guest


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I think thaty \"The Bells\" by Edgar Allan Poe is about how different types of bells can have different types of feelings and emotions on your life and change your life in differnet ways. The central message is that you can draw significance to any type of object. A.P.A 6th period

| Posted on 2011-11-04 | by a guest


.: :.

The central message of the poem \"The Bells\" by Edgar Allen Poe is that you can take any common object and make it worth meaning and even use it to explain different life situations like Poe did. He used words like chiming, tinkling, and ditty in the first and second stanzas to show joy and happiness. In the third stanza he used words such as shriek, horiffied, and clamor to express a scarier tone. In the fourth stanza he said iron bells and used that as a metaphor to death. Poe used at least one metaphor in every stanza. It\'s in the first lines. The first stanzxa begins with \"Hear the sledges with the bells, Silver bells\" and when you think of silver bells you think of a light little chime and it sounds happy. This is like the second stanza except he says, \"Hear the mellow wedding bells, golden bells\" And gold is supposed to last forever like marriage. Then the final stanza starts off with saying \"Hear the tolling of the bells, Iron bells\". Edgar uses auditory image in every stanza too when he uses words like, chiming, tinbkling, clangor, clash to describe the different tones of the bells in each verse. I could really hear the bells as I read it.
Carly Wilson Period 6

| Posted on 2011-11-04 | by a guest


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I think this poem is telling us who bells can relate to our lives. Edgar wants us to think about silver bells, golden bells, brazen bells and iron bells. how they make the different sounds and he shows different feelings. Also i think it relates to life because he ends in iron bells and the moaning and groaning of the bells and the sobbing of the bells. bels dont sob he justthinks it sopunds like sobbing he/she does. they dont moan and groan either. TJM PERIOD 3

| Posted on 2011-11-04 | by a guest


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WELL the cental message of the peom is that any common object can be represented as an explaintion for anything as long as it makes sense.Also the tone of the peom varys in each stanza but im pretty sure that it has nothing to do with his life since it was never very happy in the begining so the first and second stanza really wouldnt apply to his personal life.
M.P for 3rd period

| Posted on 2011-11-04 | by a guest


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The poem reflects on his wifes life.d.j. period 3.

| Posted on 2011-11-04 | by a guest


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i think the poems not about bells i think its a life cycle he could use any object by dylan boniface:)

| Posted on 2011-11-04 | by a guest


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the d.d.i.t.t.s (c.m)
Diction- 1st two stanza\'s word choice leads to a happy, positive tone tone , last two stanza\'s word choice lead to a negative word choice
Devices- entire poem is a metaphor and the author uses similes
Imagery-autotary and visual imagery
Technique- alliteration,internal rhyme
Tone- changes through out the poem
Speaker- unclear speaker
C.M.- you can draw consequences from any common subject or object

| Posted on 2011-10-31 | by a guest


.: :.

The central message of the poem :the bells; by Edgar Allan Poe is that there are 4 stages of the poem. The first stage is the silver bells, when you are born because silver is shiny, pretty and has a new nice sound to it. The second stage is when you are in your teen and pre-teen years, the gold bells. The third stage is brazen bells, it・s when your life starts to feel like it is all crashing down on you just in one moment you don・t have time to save yourself , it・s like in your 20・s and 30・s.And the last bell is the iron bell, where you start to get older and older and pass on. I also think that the central message is that you can get so much out of so little objects with passion and words.
Diction-these are some of the words I did not understand- tintinnabulation, euphony, endeavor, palpitating, melancholy, paean, bosom and runic. But I got the definitions
Devices- Assonance (onomatopoeia), repetition, rhythm and meter
Imagery- Auditory and visual. One example would be when it says on line 3 of stanza 3 :What a tale of terror, now, their turbulence tells;
Technique- Alliteration, Internal rhyme, and rhyming musical
Tone-throughout the poem the tone changes within the first stanza (happy, serine), second stanza (upbeat, a little sad, ditty), third stanza (scared, horrified, sad, loud) and the final and forth stanza (mellow, sad, depressing).
Speaker-the speaker is unclear. It could be a man, woman, dog, cat, hobo, or even a store clerk.
Interesting facts-did you know that bells was said 60 times in the whole poem!!!
Discussion Quest-
1. What do you think the poem would sound like without any similes or onomatopeaos?
2. Why do you think Edgar Allan Poe chose to change the tone throughout the poem?
3. What do you think he meant by what he said on lines 8-12 in the second stanza?

| Posted on 2011-10-28 | by a guest


.: :.

D.D.I.T.T.S. (cm)
The Bells
Diction :
The 1st two stanzas - positive word choice leads to happy tone
The last two stanzas - negative word choice leads to terror, horridness, & melancholy tone in final stanza.
Devices :
Entire poem is a metaphor. Author uses simile.
Imagery :
Auditory & Visual
Technique :
Alliteration, Internal Rhyme & Rhyming -- musical
Tone :
Changes throughout ; unclear.
Speaker/cm :
You can draw significance from any common object, such as markers.
K.C.

| Posted on 2011-10-28 | by a guest


.: :.

D.D.I.T.T.S. (cm)
The Bells
Diction :
The 1st two stanzas - positive word choice leads to happy tone
The last two stanzas - negative word choice leads to terror, horridness, & melancholy tone in final stanza.
Devices :
Entire poem is a metaphor. Author uses simile.
Imagery :
Auditory & Visual
Technique :
Alliteration, Internal Rhyme & Rhyming -- musical
Tone :
Changes throughout ; unclear.
Speaker/cm :
You can draw significance from any common object, such as markers.
K.C.

| Posted on 2011-10-28 | by a guest


.: :.

I think the main idea of the poem is to make something out of a simple object. I believe that the poem\'s tone is happiness in the first and second stanzas .In the first and second stanzas he uses the words happiness and delight that lead me to think of the tone of the 1st and 2nd stanzas tone is happiness . The next two stanzas the tone is sadness . In the 3rd and 4th stanzas he uses the words terror and affright that lead me to think of the tone sadness . I also think each bell symbolizes a stage in life . For example iron bells are about when you die . Iron becomes worthless , old , unuseful and rusty just as if we were getting old and dieing . Poe also use many onomatopoeias in this poem . I believe Poe wrote this poem based on his childhood and his wifes death . Poe wrote this poem shortly after his wifes death . His was 39 when he wrote this poem not that old to be worrying about death . I have also noticed that he wrote the word bell 60 times . I wonder . Did that happen by mistake ? I was also wondering why did he metioned ghouls in stanza 4 . Maybe he was referring to death as in the person.We may never find out.
*!F.V!* PERIOD 3

| Posted on 2011-10-28 | by a guest


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the poems central message is that you can give significance to any common object N.B.

| Posted on 2011-10-28 | by a guest


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In the simplest analysis, each stanza of \"The Bells\" deals with a particular type of bell and seeks to establish a specific mood. Poe associates the silver sledge bells with merriment and excitement, while the golden wedding bells are a celebration and a promise of joy. Then, with the next two sections come some far more ominous emotions, as the \"brazen\" alarm bells create an atmosphere of horror, and the iron bells toll to announce the coming of death. Silver and gold are the more valuable metals, and consequently Poe associates them with the happier stanzas. The presence of these four distinct scenarios make \"The Bells\" somewhat different from Poe\'s typical writing, which often seeks to establish a single mood in accordance with his aesthetic theories of unity M.B 3rd period

| Posted on 2011-10-28 | by whyusogay


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I LIKE PUDDING I LIKE PUDDING I LIKE PUDDING I LIKE PUDDING I LIKE PUDDING I LIKE PUDDING I LIKE PUDDING I LIKE PUDDING I LIKE PUDDING I LIKE PUDDING I LIKE PUDDING I LIKE PUDDING I LIKE PUDDING I LIKE PUDDING!

| Posted on 2011-10-28 | by a guest


.: :.

I believe that the central message is that you can draw signifigance from any common object. Poe gives the poem so many tones because it\'s talking about a persons life. His rhyming in the poem is almost musical like you can sing it. Even though the speaker is unclear, most people just interpert it in their own way. The tone does change throughout the poem and this is his only one that does this, I think(personally) that it\'s good that this poem is not more than one, because it gives it \"life\". Some poems that I\'ve read not even by this author are kind of boring. Having more than one signifigant tone is good. I like that in the 1st 2 stanzas the positive word choice leads to a cheerful, happy tone. Which, in this case, I think is more reffered to the wedding bells he mentions. In the last 2 stanzas his negative word choice leads to a terror,horidness and melancholy tone. Especially in the final stanza. Poe definetily uses similes and the entire poem is a metaphor. I\'d also like to mention that he says bells 60 times in the poem, which I believe leads to the changing of the tones in some ways. Poe uses auditory and visual imagery. The auditory is if you hear a person say it, and they say it the right way, then you can hear how the tone changes. For me the visual imagery I see like in the 2nd stanza i see wedding bells and I see a wedding. And in the final stanza i see a guy laying in a mortuary dead. And i think i will end it here.
N.K.W. Period 6.

| Posted on 2011-10-28 | by a guest


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I think that the central message of the poem is that any common object can be used to symbolize the cirle of life.Also i think that another central message is that their are four main stages in life and life is short so live life to the fullest. Going back to the four main stages, in the first stanza the tone is happy, \"hear the sledges with bells\". Also so some diction for the first stanza, merriment and heavens leads to the happy tone. In the second stanza as well as the first stanza is happy,like \" the mellow wedding bells\". and the diction is happiness, molten-golden and delight. In the third stanza the tone changes dramstily, to like a scary/middle life crises type deal. And thr diction to support this is, terror, scream, horrified, shriek, fire, mad, danger and anger to name a few. And finally in the last stanza the tone is sad tone and the diction words are, solemn, affright and rust to name a few. ALso the author use imagery throughout the poem kssp its tone in the different stanzas.

| Posted on 2011-10-28 | by a guest


.: :.

I think it\'s about the journey thoughout life.
Because when you\'re a child you are pure so you have silver bells.Also silver tarnishes,much like your childhood over time.Then when your older (a young adult) and your about to get married.You are happy and gold last forever much like a marriage should.Brazen bells are fire bells or alarm bells. So it\'s like a horrible event that might happen to you. Like a fire or a loss of a family member or a close friend. Also it could mean you have realized that you have passed your prime. Finally you come to the iron bells, which means death it\'s self. As you know iron tends to rust and break over time, much like people. Plus in the 4th stanza it says \"From the rust within their throats\" which means people have blood in there throats from tuberculous. Which was a death sentence back then.
M.W period 3

| Posted on 2011-10-27 | by a guest


.: :.

I think the bells represent four stages of life.
Silver bells represent childhood because, kids ride sledges down a snow hill. Also children wait up on christmas night to hear bells.
Gold bells represent marriage and happiness. The gold bells make you think of wedding bells. In the poem it says \" What a world of happiness thier harmony foretells\". Their is reffering to the married
couple.
Brazen bells represent sorrow and horror. It reminds me of a mid-life crisis. The poem even says \"How they scream out their fright\". This proves they are sad and they are in horror.
Iron bells represent death and ghouls. The king of ghouls dies. This is also the last stage of life when you die. The poem says \"The moaning and the groaning of the bells\". In the last line I think the bells are representing a person.
This is D.K. from third period.

| Posted on 2011-10-27 | by a guest


.: :.

From my point of view, I see this poem representing Each season. Like how, in Stanza 1 Everything thing is happy and Cheerful.the silver bells refer to childhood and how it doesn\'t last forever. In spring, everything is blooming, everyone is outside(Due to the sun warming everyone up after a cold winter), and animals coming out of their little homes. Like the silver bells, Spring also does not last forever, even though we can look forward to it after winter. In Stanza 2, everything remains happy and cheeful but in a different way. The gold bells seem to represent Marriage and how its supossed to last forever. Summer, in a way, is just like the gold bells. In summer, it is VERY hot outside but, everyone enjoys their time off from School/Work, families take trips together, and in general, having a good time. Like the gold bells, Summer is a time that everyone wants to last forever but it won\'t. the only way the gold bells differ is how some marriages last though some may not. In stanza 3 things start to turn into terror and gets a Negative tone to it. The Brazen bells in this poem Seem to \"Shriek\". A shriek that just might send a chill down each readers spine. The brazen bells are sort of smilar to the season, Fall. Like the brazen bells, the season fall seems to slert everyone that winter is coming. Especially because the tempurature is starting to drop and everyone seems to get sick quicker. In stanza 4 the iron bells come out and everything is more about death. When you read stanza four it kinda gives you that feeling of being alone or dark, Like winter. In winter, everything is dying,(Just most of the plants, i don\'t mean the people) Its too cold to be outside sometimes, and winter (When you cut out all of the holidays and days off from school/work) seems pretty boring and dark. Stanza four leaves a harsh cold tone just like how Snow(For all my northern friends)can leave everything cold and hard to get through. the only difference, just like how I compared fall and stanza 3, is that after winter you can look forward to a warm spring whereas after stanza 4 you\'re done. Like, theres nothing left to read or \"do\". *S.M.G*

| Posted on 2011-10-27 | by a guest


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I think this represents one of Edgar\'s wives.The silver bells represent dating like when he says:\"While the stars that oversprinkle, All the heavens seem to twinkle With a crystalline delight\" to represent maybe they\'re sitting underneath the stars, observing them. The gold bells represent marriage, as shown in the poem (\"Hear the mellow wedding bells\"). The brazen bells represent near-death. The tell-tale signs of near-death in this section is the bells shreiking like alarms. Alarms of incoming life-changing trajedy. The iron bells represent the death that the brazen bells had warned about before. The moaning and groaning of the bells represent the grief of who ever knew her and loved her.I\'m not really sure what ghouls have to do with anything, but I think they represent her corpse and that some people who know about her in his poems represent that her soul lives on.(Like with ghouls, they are undead ghosts, or like zombies but in a sort-of ghost form.)*S.B*

| Posted on 2011-10-26 | by a guest




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