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To The Virgins, To Make Much Of Time Analysis



Author: Poetry of Robert Herrick Type: Poetry Views: 5828





Gather ye rose-buds while ye may,

Old Time is still a flying:

And this same flower that smiles today,

Tomorrow will be dying.



The glorious lamp of heaven, the sun,

The higher he's a getting;

The sooner will his race be run,

And nearer he's to setting.



That age is best, which is the first,

When youth and blood are warmer;

But being spent, the worse, and worst

Times, still succeed the former.



Then be not coy, but use your time;

And while ye may, go marry:

For having lost but once your prime,

You may forever tarry.










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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

After all , life is brief... we need to live it to the fuillest! time flies so fast... for the deeds undone.. and words unspoken... so while you still have time grab it... live ....

| Posted on 2012-07-06 | by a guest


.: :.

this poem is about having fun when ever you are young because when you get married your are stuck with that one person. That is what the poem is explaining

| Posted on 2012-03-22 | by a guest


.: :.

this poem is about having fun when ever you are young because when you get married your are stuck with that one person. That is what the poem is explaining

| Posted on 2012-03-22 | by a guest


.: :.

this poem indicates young women to make much time as they are in their young ages.They should still have fum and not to take serious relationships.As time is early,they must enjoy it because being young is just once in a lifetime so they must not waste their time to nonsense things.

| Posted on 2012-01-15 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem is not just having sex before getting old but to be happy and be who you are and do things that will make you happy while you\'re still young. Don\'t mind what others might say. Just be happy. And that if you may, go marry before getting old and be a cherry-ripe forever.
-Uki

| Posted on 2011-10-03 | by a guest


.: :.

hey ! thanks for the great help ! love it really .

| Posted on 2011-07-03 | by a guest


.: :.

its confused....its an idiom that meaning was hide

| Posted on 2011-05-28 | by a guest


.: :.

this poem means to just live life and to do it right because you can go to the future just to make it right and young people are like flowers one day theyre beautiful and young and the next day something can happened or you just dont notice when you get old, time goes fast and you have to live the right way....

| Posted on 2011-04-26 | by a guest


.: :.

To me, when I read this poem...it seemed that Robert Herrick was referring to the virginity of women. At first it seems as though he said to have fun and do what you like, but then you read the end and it gave a sense of disgusts as he says that \"For having lost but once your prime, You may for ever tarry.\" It is as though he is saying that have as much fun as you want in your early years, just understand the consequences.

| Posted on 2011-03-28 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem is from a genre of poems called Carpe Diem theat was popular in the 1600s. \"Carpe Diem\" is a latin saying that loosly traslates to \"seize the day.\" The poetry genre addressed young girls, urging them to give up their virginity. This is one of the most famous Carpe Diem poems.
He\'s Definetly talking to young women, that\'s why he calls them \"rose-buds.\" It\'s a femanine term. He is telling them that they are only young once so they need to take advantage of their youth and have sex now. That is what he means when he says, \"this same flower that smiles today,/ Tomorrow will be dying.\" He is telling them that their death is coming. Life is short.
He means the same thing when he talks about the sun. Many Carpe Diem poems reference the sun charriot from Greek and Roman mythology. The sun flying through the sky every day is a sigh of time passing.

| Posted on 2011-01-29 | by a guest


.: :.

i really dont know what this poem is about. i think its about no matter what everything ends. and yeah. to live your life and give time to what ever is needed.

| Posted on 2010-12-14 | by a guest


.: :.

Herrick’s “To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time” was written in 1648. This poem urges the youth to celebrate life and its pleasures. The persona in this poem is talking to young people in general and is telling them to enjoy every day as it comes. In the opening stanza, the poet says, “And this same flower that smiles today, Tomorrow will be dying” (Herrick 79). In this line, the poet uses an extended metaphor to compare the youth to rosebuds and also uses personification because the flower is given human qualities. The line shows how rosebuds, or young people, should enjoy every day of their life and be happy because they might not make it to the next day. The rose represents the youth since roses are fresh and full of life, yet eventually both the rose and the young people will die. In the next stanza, the sun is personified by showing that time passes by quickly and should therefore be enjoyed whenever possible. The setting of the sun symbolizes the fate of human beings. The third stanza says that one is at the best time of one’s life while on is young. The last stanza of the poem urges young and inexperienced people to pursue love and get married young. One should not wait to get married, because one will probably end up living in loneliness.

| Posted on 2010-11-22 | by a guest


.: :.

\"Read this poem with a Cookie Monster voice. It makes so much more sense.
| Posted on 2010-02-22 | by a guest\"
LMAOOO
ok basically the speaker is telling us to take advantage of our youth because we will never get it back. liek how the sun reached the top of the sky and is in its prime, but then goes down hill after that. marry while we are still young and ebautiful because if we delay it further, it may never happen.

| Posted on 2010-11-07 | by a guest


.: :.

how are you gonna say duh. you have no idea what the author meant, unless you know the guy. people like you is ignant, you think you can read someone\'s mind. He could have meant anything. your probably right but your still a douche

| Posted on 2010-10-05 | by a guest


.: :.

NO! when he speaks of virgins, he\'s not singling out those who havent had sex. he\'s just talking about the young and healthy. The YOUTH. Those who have not lived long and are just experiancing life. DUH!

| Posted on 2010-09-13 | by a guest


.: :.

his poem is about spending the most of your time especially when we were still kids.Because when we were still kids, we are free and we must cherish the time that was given to us because we still have a lots of time.We must use it so that we will not regreet if time comes....

| Posted on 2010-07-19 | by a guest


.: :.

this is telling people to live their lives the way they want to... not to give up their body persay but it could lead to that depending on the situation

| Posted on 2010-05-10 | by a guest


.: :.

Gather ye rose-buds while ye may,
Old Time is still a flying:
And this same flower that smiles today,
Tomorrow will be dying.
The glorious lamp of heaven, the sun,
The higher he's a getting;
The sooner will his race be run,
And nearer he's to setting.
That age is best, which is the first,
When youth and blood are warmer;
But being spent, the worse, and worst
Times, still succeed the former.
Then be not coy, but use your time;
And while ye may, go marry:
For having lost but once your prime,
You may forever tarry.

| Posted on 2010-05-05 | by a guest


.: :.

BOOM HEADSHOT!!! THIS POEM IS FRIGGIN AWESOME... IM SAYING THIS EVEN THOUGH I HAVENT READ IT AT ALL. *BOLD ATTACK* IF IT WORKED, YOU'LL KNOW x

| Posted on 2010-03-15 | by a guest


.: :.

Read this poem with a Cookie Monster voice. It makes so much more sense.

| Posted on 2010-02-22 | by a guest


.: :.

It's not about loosing your virginity, but saving yourself till marriage--waiting--but while you wait, have a merry time. Enjoy your youth. Do all that you can before you embark on to holy matrimony, before loosing your virginity.

| Posted on 2009-09-17 | by a guest


.: :.

First published in 1648 in a volume of verse entitled Hesperides, To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time is perhaps one of the most famous poems to extol the notion of carpe diem. Carpe diem, or seize the day, expresses a philosophy that recognizes the brevity of life and therefore the need to live for and in the moment. Seizing the day means eating, drinking and making merry for tomorrow we shall all die. The phrase was used by classicists such as Horace, and its spirit marks the theme of Herricks lyric poem. Echoing Ben Jonsons poem, Song: To Celia, the speaker of the poem underscores the ephemeral quality of life and urges those in their youth to actively celebrate life and its pleasures; however, the speaker does not urge the virgins simply to frolic adulterously, but to seek union in matrimony, thereby uniting the natural cycles of life and death with the rites and ceremonies of Christian worship. Although a very common theme in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century verse, and particularly in Cavalier poetry, the association of Christianity and carpe diem is not a traditional one; it is unique to Herrick and perhaps natural given Herricks thirty-two year career as vicar of Dean Prior, an appointment originally bestowed by King Charles I. Written during a period of great political unrest that culminated in Britains Civil War, the theme and the sage advice proffered by the speaker of the poem appears appropriate in this particularly transient period. The carpe diem spirit, however, has translated to modern times and is the theme of Henry Jamess The Ambassadors and Robert Frosts Carpe Diem.

| Posted on 2009-09-17 | by a guest


.: :.

Thank you very much for the usefull info; and not so thankfull for the funny ones...
I needed the info for a quiz my english teacher gave us. It says like this:
Gather thy roses while ye x already got everything but the "why?" Which I Know it but I do not know how to express it and I wanted to know if the "WW" was related to war or it just where nothing...

| Posted on 2009-09-06 | by a guest


.: :.

Milton is alluding to the parable of the virgins in the Bible (Matt 25).

| Posted on 2009-05-29 | by a guest


.: :.

This has been a great help, thank you everyone for putting in your thoughts, I agree it is a carpe diem poem, saying that you won't be young for every so marry now while your young and everything can be enjoyable!

| Posted on 2009-04-27 | by a guest


.: :.

@!! y@!! N!KK@$ c@n 3@t @ d!ck +he p03m !$ @b0ut smokin and p0ppin p!lls like y@lls m0mm@s wh3n $h3 w@$ pr3nan+!

| Posted on 2009-04-02 | by a guest


.: :.

this poem is saying..if you a virgin, GIVE IT UP! FAST!

| Posted on 2009-03-17 | by a guest


.: :.

this poem is about how asian women should give it to black men and tape so we can all watch them suffer through the pain talk about emotion

| Posted on 2009-03-10 | by a guest


.: :.

this peom is about how all virgins should give it up to black men.

| Posted on 2009-03-04 | by a guest


.: :.

It's not so much about just having sex. It's very obviously a 17th century "carpe diem" themed poem. It is about living life to it's fullest, but it's also "to the virgins" saying they should get married while they're still young and attracive enough to have that ability.

| Posted on 2009-02-03 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem is talking about how virgins should go have sex before it is too late. When you get old, sex is not as enjoyable. That is why it is important to have alot of sex during one's youth.

| Posted on 2009-01-20 | by a guest


.: :.

carpe diem-seize the day while you're still young and are able to live life to the fullest!

| Posted on 2009-01-13 | by a guest


.: :.

since they are speaking to virgins is tells them that the young years are the most prim and that "youth and blood are warmer" which means they should "seize the day"....which includes sexual aspects...as well..
if they get older- or too old it will be to late

| Posted on 2008-12-12 | by a guest


.: :.

I htink this poem is about living life to the fullest. What this guy is saying is that even though it seems we have forever, we really dont and time passes quick. He's telling us that every beginning has an end and that even though we have our youth and are free eventually time will come to pass and we won't be young anymore. He's saying to be yourself and use the time you have, not rush into things but to do it when you know its time. We can't be young forever!

| Posted on 2008-12-09 | by a guest


.: :.

His poem is about making the most of your life, especially when you are young, or in your prime. The last stanza of his poem tells his reader to stop being shy, have fun in life! Find someone you want to be with forever, before it is too late. I think his main point is that too many people waste their prime time for things that they have always been doing, risks arent being taken. By ending the poem with, You may for ever tarry, Herrick is telling you that you are only young once. Why wait for this opportunity to come back in the future, if it is right in your face now?
-ladybug

| Posted on 2008-12-07 | by a guest


.: our english class anylisi :.

A, B, A B, ryhme scheme
It's saying have fun while your a kid and savor your childhood. Make the most of the time that you have, when your young you have so much going for you.
"Then be not coy, but use your times." -don't be phony and hide anything, don't play around with your time and while and then the next line he says and while you do get married.

Last line- "you may forever tarry" -your always going to wait for that oppertunity to come again but it nevver will and you will regret that time if you did not use it well.

| Posted on 2006-04-18 | by Approved Guest




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