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Meeting At Night Analysis



Author: Poetry of Robert Browning Type: Poetry Views: 6053





I.



The grey sea and the long black land;

And the yellow half-moon large and low;

And the startled little waves that leap

In fiery ringlets from their sleep,

As I gain the cove with pushing prow,

And quench its speed i' the slushy sand.



II.



Then a mile of warm sea-scented beach;

Three fields to cross till a farm appears;

A tap at the pane, the quick sharp scratch

And blue spurt of a lighted match,

And a voice less loud, thro' its joys and fears,

Than the two hearts beating each to each!










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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

This is my favourite love poem ever. Elizabeth and Robert Browning\'s love story is just unbelievably romantic- imagine an anorexic, sickly girl who spends her days in bed writing poetry, never going out to meet anyone, falling in love with a man who has read her poetry and who writes to her to tell her. Robert Browning\'s other work is very different. His poems are interesting and contain very strong, almost violent imagery- look at Porphyria\'s Lover or even My Last Duchess. We may be fascinated with the poems but we don\'t identify with the poet. And then out of the blue, here\'s a poem that is so sweet and innocent that it has to mean something more to Browning than just art for art\'s sake. Of COURSE the poem is about love, of COURSE this love is forbidden and of COURSE it involves sex. But the subtlety of it all is whats so engrossing. We know it\'s a love poem but we don\'t see the actual affair till the last four lines. And even then, the lovers don\'t rush madly into each other\'s arms and rip clothes off craving bodies! I actually happen to think that this love is exciting and forbidden. And that the speaker is a terribly romantic figure- he\'s bold, he\'s madly in love, he\'s daring and he takes risks. He also goes through a great deal of trouble only to meet his beloved for one night.

| Posted on 2013-01-20 | by a guest


.: :.

Oh lord, you people are so close minded. I\'m studying this poem in my English class and if YOU did your research right, you would know that Robert Browning was trying to make a comment about the hypocritical puritanical Victorian society. At this time, nobody would even dare use the word \'leg\' in a sentence around the opposite sex. What Robert Browning does is write a seemingly innocent poem, but which can be taken to mean something more sexual, such as even simply.. A secret affair. Now this makes the Victorian reader realize how \'dirty\' their mind can be... And thus Robert Browning succeeds in breaking through the materialistic and fake mask people put on to reveal to themselves, that how non puritanical infact they are. Robert Browning is basically really clever, can you imagine a woman all dressed in her corset puffy skirt reading this, thinking of it being sexual ( as the human psyche does) yet she feels embarrassed to think like that because it is not accepted in society and because Browning has never fully suggested the sexual aspect. He invokes a doubt within the reader. Makes them think how hypocritical the puritanical society is. Now this doesn\'t go for all, but definitely for the pretentious people. Robert Browning made a great point and was quite clever in how he achieved it:)

| Posted on 2011-05-27 | by a guest


.: :.

It\'s not dirty or perverted in any way for it to be about sex. How is that worse than Browning writing about killing people?! I believe it shows both their struggle for their hidden relationship and also the romantic sexual intimacy that they share after their meeting. Don\'t blame us \'perverts\' for our analysis, blame Browning for writing it! It is in some childrens books but how many children psycho analyse poems for sexual content? A lot of literature is sexual. Especially old poems filled with metaphors. It was forbidden and therefore much more exciting and romantic. Much like how this poem manages to be both romantic and exciting!

| Posted on 2010-09-22 | by a guest


.: :.

There are two \"stories\" being told by the poem. The \"cover story\" is about the trip the poet is taking to visit, meet with his lover. The \"beneath\" story can\'t be told explicitly in Victorian England - it is the subtle, and BEAUTIFUL representation of sexual union. It is not gross, or filthy to think so, as some suggest. It is a brillian and radical artistic achievement. Read with an open mind.
The grey sea and the long black land;
And the yellow half-moon large and low;

This seems merely to set a mood, to paint a landscape, to anchor us in a space and time. It is darkness, and night, illuminated, but still secret. It is the place where lovers come together (or at least in Victorian England, where we can be pretty sure no one made love during the day!). It is also two distinct entities, a grey sea and a long black land. They are two, separate, but how do you really determine where they come apart, ocean and sand? They are integrally related, united, though separate. And they lay beneath a yellow half-moon, the moon being a female planet, historically, mythically female – woman owns the night, the dark, the lunar cycle, menses.
“And the startled little waves that leap
In fiery ringlets from their sleep”
Is our first hint that the poem is about sexual union, about sensation that can actually be shared, experienced both by a man and a woman…. Those first frissons, shivers, of sexual sensation that are part of the experience of foreplay (a word that sounds so drab in this context). “startled little waves that leap” – can you think of a better way to describe what happens?
As I gain the cove with pushing prow,
And quench its speed i\' the slushy sand.
Now this is pretty easy. The poet is describing union – the entrance into her space, the arrival, storming the beach, so to speak. On the surface, the “cover” story, he is describing a trip by boat, movement across this landscape he has placed before us. It is a trip to meet his lover (presumably the poet Elizabeth Barrett, soon-to-be Browning). But it is also the movement of a man, into a woman, “gaining” being a kind of acquisition, achievement, change in status…he is possessing her. And yet his forward momentum is brought to a halt, his speed quenched by the slushy sand of her beach. As the sand meets the ocean, they are merged, joined. He presses forward, and is received.
Then a mile of warm sea-scented beach;
I am sorry – but it has always seemed clear to me - - men have talked since before Chaucer about the smell of women… that sea-scented beach is as much her body as it is a beach. But this is Victorian England. You have to be most subtle. So we are back to landscape…
Three fields to cross till a farm appears;
And I think it is the point of this line to anchor us firmly back in landscape, to return us back to the cover story, what lies above the deeper, more symbolic and hidden meaning of the poem, which is the journey that the man is making, which is a journey to meet his lover.
A tap at the pane, the quick sharp scratch
And blue spurt of a lighted match,
And this is both the culmination of that journey – where he arrives at her door, and she lights a match to see him, light his way. But this is also, I think, a description of that moment which is also culmination, orgasm. The description of a man’s experience of it – quick, sharp….spurt…. – I should find a more elegant way to say this, because I don’t mean to be reductive. It is really, I think, very subtle, creative and beautiful.
And a voice less loud, thro\' its joys and fears,
Than the two hearts beating each to each!
I am actually a bit baffled by the first line. “A voice less loud…than the two hearts beating…” I think that he is talking about his lover’s voice. A woman’s voice that would be softer than even two hearts beating. And beating each to each, this is the place where the cover story and the “beneath” story come together – it is both the journey to visit his lover, and the act of making love, that end with their two hearts beating each to each. The conventional Victorian reader can comfortably imagine all this happening through a waistcoat, layers of tulle, and a whale-boned corset, without scandal. But the reader, in his/her innermost mind, can read in this something they cannot even speak of in the company of their own sex, which is that so-private act of sexual union. It’s really quite brilliant. And radical.
So then Browning writes this short little poem, which in anthologies is often linked to the first.
Parting At Morning
Round the cape of a sudden came the sea,
And the sun looked over the mountain\'s rim:
And straight was a path of gold for him,
And the need of a world of men for me
And this is about difference of the world of man, from that of woman. It speaks to the female experience of the couple, that voice less loud. It is about the sudden rising of the sun, which is the planet of man. Man owns the day, the world of work, and commerce and industry. (Victorian England) So there is this sudden juxtaposition of land (cape) and sea – reminding us of the separateness of these two. The sudden appearance of the sun, looking over the land, illuminating the scene, laying down a path of gold for him. And reminding her of her separateness, and her need for him, the need of a world of men for me. Or, this could be his voice – the author speaking of himself in the third person until that last line, and talking about his own need to return, from her, to that world of men. (The kind of stuff people argue about forever…).
- JNC, in grateful rememberance of Charlie Blinderman

| Posted on 2010-08-10 | by a guest


.: :.

I read this poem in Ozlem Gorey's poetry class, oh shit.

| Posted on 2010-06-09 | by a guest


.: :.

[quote]This Poem is about Robert sneaking out to meet Elizabeth. If people would do their research on the writers of the poetry they are reading they would know that Elizabeth's father did not want her to court Robert or anyone for that matter because of her illness. This poem is not about sex or murder. Its just simp;y about the love affair they had behind closed doors Before they ran away together to get married!![quote]Thank god, for the past two weeks ive been doing a ridiculously hard project on browning and this poem is just about browning sneaking off to elizabeth because as the kind person in the quotes said her father would not allow any man in her life, im not saying any of you are wrong im jus saying, most of you look way to far into it and make it harder to understand then robert probably intended.

| Posted on 2010-04-22 | by a guest


.: :.

There are, of course, innumerable ways in which 'movement' may come up for consideration. Surprised by joy was chosen as an extreme instance, in which 'imagery' hardly gave the analyst an opening at all. Commonly 'movement' and 'imagery' demand attention together. The following is a simple instance:
The gray sea and the long black land;
And the yellow half-moon large and low;
And the startled little waves that leap
In fiery ringlets from their sleep,
As I gain the cove with pushing prow,
And quench its speed i' the slushy sand.
The first two lines suggest a preoccupation with pictorial effects, and they invite a languorous reading -- or would, if we didn't know what follows. Actually, an approach might be made by asking how it is that, though the stanza is so clearly Victorian, we could have said at once, supposing ourselves to have been reading it for the first time, that it is clearly not Tennysonian or Pre-Raphaelite. The first brief answer might be that it has too much energy. We are then faced with the not difficult task of saying how the effect of energy is conveyed. To begin with,
the startled little waves that leap
In fiery ringlets from their sleep
clearly don't belong to a dreamy nocturne. The 'startled', itself an energetic word, owes some of its force to the contrast with what goes before (even though the first two lines are not to be read languorously) -- a contrast getting sharp definition in the play (a good use of rime) of 'leap' against 'sleep'.
It is an energetic couplet. The energy is active, too, in 'fiery', which is apt description, but doesn't reveal its full value till we come to 'quench' in the last line, the most interesting word in the stanza. That fire as well as thirst shall come in with the metaphor is ensured by the 'fiery', and in 'quenching' the speed the poet betrays (he probably couldn't have said why 'quench' came to him) how he has projected his own eagerness -- his ardour and desire for the goal -- into the boat, pushing on with his will, in a way that must be familiar to everyone, that which is carrying him forward. The nature of the energy that thrusts forward through the tranquil night has defined itself concretely by the time the second half of the poem has been read (it must now be given):
Then a mile of warm sea-scented beach!
Three fields to cross till a farm appears;
A tap at the pane, the quick sharp scratch
And blue spurt of a lighted match,
And a voice less loud, thro' its joys and fears,
Than the two hearts beating each to each!
Neither of the stanzas, it will have been noted, has a main verb, a lack intimately related to the mood and movement of the poem. The absence of main verb, it might be said, is the presence of the lover's purpose and goal: his single-minded intentness upon the goal and the confident eagerness with which he moves towards it are conveyed by the overtly incidental, by-the-way, nature of the sensations and perceptions, and the brisk, businesslike succession in which, from the beginning of the poem on, they are noted and left behind. Though incidental, they are vivid, as in a moment of unusual vitality and receptivity, and that this vividness -- it is at the same time a vigour of report -- should carry with it no attribution of value suggests the all absorbingness of the purpose and focus of attention. The succession of notes, in fact, conveys a progression. And the effect of energy observed at the outset derives from this particular kind of movement -- the particular sense of movement that has just been analysed. The movement, of course, derives its peculiar energy from the local vividness, but even such energetic imagery as
the quick sharp scratch
And blue spurt of a lighted match
owes something to the general movement as well as contributing, and it can hardly be said that 'quench' in the first stanza (an effect of the same order -- it works along with 'slushy' as well as having the metaphorical value already discussed) contributes more than it owes.
The movement, it might be commented, isn't very subtle, nor is the total effect; and that is true. But the simplicity has its illustrative value, and the poem is an unmistakable instance of a strong realization. Vigour of that peculiar kind, obviously involving limitations, is characteristic of Browning, but is rarely manifested so decidedly as poetic virtue, and so inoffensively to the sensitive.
_
[from "Judgement and Analysis: Notes in the Analysis of Poetry," repr. in A Selection from Scrutiny (CUP, 1968), I.243-244]

| Posted on 2010-03-22 | by a guest


.: :.

The poem reflects on the reletive inconsiquence of all else in comparison to the man's lover. The nature with which he describes the imagery of the landscape untill he arrives at his destination gives us the inpression of movement as well as allowing the mind to wander. Every line untill the final two are concerned with describing a facet of the landscape and then the tone changes. The lovers mind is now all consumed with his partner (forbiddein or not)

| Posted on 2010-03-10 | by a guest


.: :.

Dang, I thought this poem was about aliens and Nazis....oh well still passed AP Lit and Lang with 5's ;)

| Posted on 2010-02-08 | by a guest


.: :.

this poem is all about the 2 lovers who will trying to explore his or her destiny in life.In the long run. a man could somehow find ways at night for the sake of his future destiny.... The title ''MEETING AT NIGHT''it symbolizes the impediments of his life..''
By: JONRIEL G. ATIS
BUKIDNON STATE UNIVERSITY

| Posted on 2010-01-05 | by a guest


.: :.

you guys, pay attention on the "A tap at the pane, the quick sharp scratch
And blue spurt of a lighted match,
"
I think, the person has a kind of a forbidden love,.. He has to cross a sea to meet his lover, and it's done at night when every1 in the girl's village is sleeping....
hayo gimana... bener gak... bener kan...

| Posted on 2009-11-02 | by a guest


.: :.

you guys, pay attention on the "A tap at the pane, the quick sharp scratch
And blue spurt of a lighted match,
"
I think, the person has a kind of a forbidden love,.. He has to cross a sea to meet his lover, and it's done at night when every1 in the girl's village is sleeping....
hayo gimana... bener gak... bener kan...

| Posted on 2009-11-02 | by a guest


.: :.

Serenity and passion in 2 lovers meeting is demonstrated with the use of imagery and a rolling rhyme scheme in Robert Brownings "Meeting at Night".

| Posted on 2009-10-11 | by a guest


.: :.

I think this poem is about a lover who is trying to find his love but has a long way to go!!! at the end when they meet ofcorse they must of had huged each other so hard that they could feel each other heart beat.

| Posted on 2009-10-04 | by a guest


.: :.

most have alrady said it. its most likely about a man and his lover, the poem tells about the journy to get to his lover. thus creating the name of the poem, meeting at night

| Posted on 2009-07-17 | by a guest


.: :.

I believe this poem is simply about a man meeting his lover in the night. Most of the poem is using imagery and descriptions to tell the journey of the man.
The only reason why I think this poem is more on the "cleaner" side is because I first found it in a children poem book.

| Posted on 2009-06-13 | by a guest


.: :.

POETRY IS FOR PPL THAT CAN ACTUALLY ANALYZE IT CORRECTLY! IT'S NOT FOR PERVERTS THAT ARE LOOKING TO SAY THE WORD SEX IN A SCENTENCE

| Posted on 2009-05-04 | by a guest


.: :.

I came looking for the meaning of the poem.You guys are all crazy and have too much time on your hands.

| Posted on 2009-03-31 | by a guest


.: :.

The poem may be interpreted as a way of a man expressing all of what he would do for a woman.
"Then a mile of warm sea-scented beach;
Three fields to cross till a farm appears"
...
"Ain't no mountain high
Ain't no vally low"
almost as if he is talking to his lover expressing all he would do for her.
The poetic form also contributes to the poem as a whole because it can be read rhythmically as if the poem is footsteps.

| Posted on 2009-03-30 | by a guest


.: :.

In ways every opinion of this poem can be true. It is how you look at it and interprete it. I'm in highschool and have to write an analysis and this has helped me because it showed me the different possible interpretations, and helped me make my own.
Personally, I see it as the long journey a man has to take to find the one he loves. The joy, the hardship to find what you've been running towards. The imagery of what is going on around him is fleeting and short. Because in his rush to meet his love it does not matter. And isn't it true that with love, comes sex? It's naive and ignorant to think that there is only one way to read a poem.

| Posted on 2009-03-16 | by a guest


.: :.

.Readers of Meeting at night, by Robert Browning, often only see the essay as a boy sneaking out to fulfill his sexual needs by meeting with his lover at night.
They assume the boy has no other reason or intention for being there other than for his high levels of testosterone. I believe that the essay isnt necessarily about sex at all but about the mans character as he goes over water and land to keep a previously spoken promise.
This interpretation of the essay can be proven by reviewing the mans motives and intentions. In Websters Dictionary, a few definitions for character are, The inherent complex of attributes that determine a persons moral and ethical actions and reactions (Websters 3); and A Good repute; he is a man of character (Websters 6). A mans character is based on his morels, values, beliefs, and on how honest his word is. Browning is known for writing poems about men with poor character such as the characters in Porphyrias lover, The Bishop Orders His Tomb at Saint Praxeds Church and so forth.
But, I believe that although the character in our story might at first be charged with outright indecency for showing up late at night with the benefit of the doubt A tap at the pane, the quick sharp scratch And blue spurt of a lighted match, Browning portrays this man as being a man of his word and a man of great allegiance to truth and all that is good. He shows this by what great steps the character takes to meet his love.
The grey sea and the long black land;
And the yellow half-moon large and low;
And the startled little waves that leap
In fiery ringlets from their sleep, As I gain the cove with pushing prow,
And quench its speed I' the slushy sand.(Browning 6)
Here the character rows through an untold distance of water, only to be met by a mile of shoreline filled with slushy sand. Then Three fields to cross till a farm appears (Browning 8), he crosses three fields of again untold distance.
All of this, in my opinion, is an example for what he has to overcome in order to achieve his goal.

| Posted on 2008-12-09 | by a guest


.: :.

Young one+
i'm supposed to do a project on this poem. i really appreciate everyones input. im not skilled in poetry or anything. i honestly thought this was about an immegrant or something trying to get to his lover, i dont know Brownings life like you guys do. Most of these make sense to me. I think im going to go the relationship way. ill have to read on Brownings history.thanks again=]
+young one

| Posted on 2008-11-13 | by a guest


.: :.

Ok, so i don't think this poem is about sex at all... you guys are seriously reading too far into it. yes, at the end of the poem it does imply something about lovers, but the rest just describes the speaker's journey to the farm to meet his true love. jeez, say something about sex and everyone starts thinking about it.

| Posted on 2008-11-12 | by a guest


.: :.

[quote]Wow. that dude 2nd from the bottom is a freakish, insane, and devilishly horny rapist. Get your thoughts straight porky the pig. I know you want some of that in your life, but leaving comments like that is gonna get you nothin more than your hand and some lube. PEACE![/quote]
How old are you? Jesus man, he calmly explained and supported his view of the poem and you had the idiocy to call him a freak. It might not even be a male, could be a female. That'd mess you up, right? The poem clearly conveys a lot of sexualised imagery, in the very language itself.

| Posted on 2008-10-15 | by a guest


.: :.

This Poem is about Robert sneaking out to meet Elizabeth. If people would do their research on the writers of the poetry they are reading they would know that Elizabeth's father did not want her to court Robert or anyone for that matter because of her illness. This poem is not about sex or murder. Its just simp;y about the love affair they had behind closed doors Before they ran away together to get married!!

| Posted on 2008-08-25 | by a guest


.: :.

This Poem is about Robert sneaking out to meet Elizabeth. If people would do their research on the writers of the poetry they are reading they would know that Elizabeth's father did not want her to court Robert or anyone for that matter because of her illness. This poem is not about sex or murder. Its just simp;y about the love affair they had behind closed doors Before they ran away together to get married!!

| Posted on 2008-08-25 | by a guest


.: A few other ideas.. :.

Meeting at Night/Parting at Morning should also be considered in the context whence it was written. The industrial revolution had a great impact on Browning's work, as with most authors at the time (think Wordsworth's works which regard nature as divine), and this is a good line to further analyse.
Also, notice how so many of Browning's women are passive? In this poem we have no female response, both pieces are written from the male perspective. As he goes off to the "world of men" why do we get no indication of the woman's actions?
Think also of works such as Porphyrias Lover and My Last Duchess, more passive women in those poems too!

| Posted on 2008-05-30 | by a guest


.: Slob on my Knob :.

ummm...blow me. i dont need your stupid comments on how everything is about sex. even though it probably is, none of you get any sex anyways. whatever losers

| Posted on 2008-05-18 | by a guest


.: :.

Robert Browning was courting Elizabeth Barret when he wrote this poem. Elizabeth Barret was secretly engaged to Browning, because her father was against her marriage. I believe this poem is a reflection of his meetings with Elizabeth and his love for her. Also, to really understand the situation, you need to read "Parting at Morning" the sequel poem, which shows his resignation and acceptance of the situation knowing that one day they'll be together.

| Posted on 2008-05-12 | by a guest


.: Love Browning! :.

i believe that this poem id about so much more than sex, although i believe that romance is definetley an aspect of the poem. The poem is full of yearning yet acceptance. i think one must really understand the second sister poem 'Parting at Morning'to really appreciate the first 'Meeting at Midnight'. I would like to put forward that the persona in the poem may be beneath the love he is going to meet, hence the need for secrecy but must then return to 'the world of men'to earn his living... just a theory.
I love this poem!

| Posted on 2008-05-08 | by a guest


.: :.

Mhm...i think nephthys has a point. but uhm...don't be too harsh nephthys eh? chill. You're attacking the person itself and not the his/her argument, don't you think?
All those stuff about them being just high school and amateurs etc does not bode well for your argument and it is besides the point as well as irrelevant, not to mention overgeneralizing.
I'm not saying that you're completely wrong or whatever, for some of them really are looking at the poem with the wrong interpretation...but chill...
Anyway,I think you're right that we have to think of the environment when he created the poem as well as his and his wife's life back then.
I also think that it's kinda a rendezvous or a clandestine meeting. But that doesn't mean that it is sex already. It could be graphical, metaphorical, yes, that their meeting is their meeting in their correspondence.
The point is, even if it does mention stuff about 'Meeting at Night' not to mention its partner poem 'Parting at Morning' and the 'two hearts beating each to each,' that doesn't necessarily mean that we should jump to the conclusion that its about sex already.
Sometimes, people do stuff that are terribly useless and petty. They don't really appreciate and not even take the effort to try to think about the real meaning of poems. It just goes to show the reflection of their minds. all they think about are dirty thoughts and 'sex'. They don't even think about respecting other people's work. People like Browning who are apparently a thousand times these people. ~green

| Posted on 2008-05-08 | by a guest


.: Secret Desire( :.

No offence to anyone, but I honestly think people ought to be more matured and try to get a possible interpretation of this beautiful poem by linking it to the literature of that period and not be plain crude. To those who strongly feel that this poem is about murder and spying I suggest you get your facts straight and do some background reading on Robert Browning before you start assuming you know more than anyone else. Your only in highschool and you have alot more to learn wherease some of us are majoring in literature and have much more experience in this feild that yourself. Its ok to come up with new interpretations, as its always great to have a fresh perspective but I think your 'I know it all' attitude is amateurish and completely unacceptable. Anyways, this poem comes from his collection of Dramatic Lyrics and Romances and he was a master poet of the Victorian Age. If you know anything at all about the Victorian age like some of you who mentioned earlier, sex and romantic love were considered taboo subjects. As radical you might be, one can't deny the fact that this poem does have sexual connotations to it. For conservatives please try to look at his poems with an open mind and for those who embrace art for arts' sake, keep it up. Apart from the 2 interpretations below, we might also want to link this up with Browning's personal life. The courtship between Elizabeth Barrett Browning and himself was done secretly and they use to communicate with each other in sonnett forms and romantic lyrics. This could be mirroring his own love story and his yearning to see her and for their grand secret communion. Afterall he did elope with her and this could be something like a secret wish he has subtly expressed in his poem. Just something to ponder over... Cheers. - nephthys-

| Posted on 2008-05-01 | by a guest


.: OMFG :.

Wow. that dude 2nd from the bottom is a freakish, insane, and devilishly horny rapist. Get your thoughts straight porky the pig. I know you want some of that in your life, but leaving comments like that is gonna get you nothin more than your hand and some lube. PEACE!

| Posted on 2008-04-17 | by a guest


.: ur all dumb as dorknobs!! :.

Ha im nuts, eh? Well you keep on goin the way ur goin bud. Ought to end you up some where, like in a fricken cardboard box! And if this is someone from my highschool, thank you for caring enough to reply to my comments

| Posted on 2008-04-17 | by a guest


.: Metting at Night :.

Murder? Spy on the boat?
Um.... Yeah this is a love poem, so um yeah, your nuts. Anyway. Your the one Obessed with sex. Anywho, here is my interpretation.
I believe that it coult be about sex, since talking about sex was a little taboo at the time and it is well known that many poets and writers of the time worked in subtle ways to mention sex and talk about sex back in the older days witch spaned hundreds of years.
But i think it's a more of a loving thing then the person who interpreted it as oh yeah he "triumphed"
There is the literal meening that the author went a long way in the middle of the night to see his love.
and i think the person who was saying somethign about the stages of like was getting somewhere, but didn't really complete that thought at all.
And it seemed the ther person who was traveling along the same line would have done really well in expaining it, had they actually finished, then left off int he middle of a sentence, witch is a sham i would have liked to hear their interpretation, since it seems to have been an interesinting view.

| Posted on 2008-04-11 | by a guest


.: WHY SEX!!!!!!????? :.

SEX SEX SEX SEX SEX SEX SEX SEX SEX SEX SEX SEX SEX SEX SEX SEX SEX SEX SEX SEX SEX SEX SEX SEX SEX SEX!
WHY MUST IT BE ABOUT SEX! THIS IS RIDICULOUS AND YOU NEED TO GET YOUR THOUGHTS STRAIGHT!

| Posted on 2008-04-06 | by a guest


.: Continued :.

Sex, Sex, Sex that is all you think about. Could the plot be for a murder, and the person who is on the boat is a spy? Im in high school, and it seems that
I know a bit more about the topic than you folks seem to.

| Posted on 2008-04-03 | by a guest


.: Different Assumption :.

Do all the assumptions have to be about sex? I believe that the poem is possibly a plot for something other than you happen to think. Otherwise, it seems rather naive and foolish to believe that the is , no matter what, about sex.

| Posted on 2008-04-03 | by a guest


.: Different Assumption :.

Do all the assumptions have to be about sex? I believe that the poem is possibly a plot for something other than you happen to think. Otherwise, it seems rather naive and foolish to believe that the is , no matter what, about sex.

| Posted on 2008-04-03 | by a guest


.: meeting at night :.

This is a summary of all of the fantastic summaries of this poem. thank you for all of your help In this poem Browning makes an archetype to time by the way he refers to both the distance for the lovers to undertake to get to one another and also time itself; the speaker measures the time before he can reach his lover. However the poem is also an allegory for sex and sexuality. For example in the first line the speaker refers to the long black land which can easily be interpreted for a

| Posted on 2008-01-13 | by a guest




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