famous poetry
| Famous Poetry | Roleplay | Free Video Tutorials | Online Poetry Club | Free Education | Best of Youtube | Ear Training

Echoing Green, The Analysis



Author: Poetry of William Blake Type: Poetry Views: 3865





The sun does arise,

And make happy the skies;

The merry bells ring

To welcome the spring;

The skylark and thrush,

The birds of the bush,

Sing louder around

To the bell's cheerful sound,

While our sports shall be seen

On the Echoing Green.



Old John with white hair,

Does laugh away care,

Sitting under the oak,

Among the old folk.

They laugh at our play,

And soon they all say:

"Such, such were the joys

When we all, girls and boys,

In our youth time were seen

On the Echoing Green."



Till the little ones, weary,

No more can be merry;

The sun does descend,

And our sports have an end.

Round the laps of their mothers

Many sisters and brother,

Like birds in their nest,

Are ready for rest,

And sport no more seen

On the darkening Green.

.






Sponsor


122 Free Video Tutorials

[Video Tutorial] How to build google chrome extensions

Please add me on youtube. I make free educational video tutorials on youtube such as Basic HTML and CSS.

Free Online Education from Top Universities

Yes! It's true. Online College Education is now free!



||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

The poem has a reminiscent tone to it. The elderly missing their youthful days.
'To welcome the spring'- A time of growth, symbolic for children growing up. Blake uses natural imagery and pastural settings to symbolize open spaces and how free childhood was.
'Sun does arise'- the sun rise symbolizes birth, the beginning of life.
'On the echoing green'- is repeated twice throughout the poem. This is to signify that the joy is ongoing and everlasting
AABB rhyme scheme
Language: is simple and repititive, reflecting the simplicity of the speaker and the scene

| Posted on 2013-12-06 | by a guest


.: :.

The last comment may have been the silliest thing I\'ve ever read.
Blake wishes to show the innocence of youth and inexperience but also acknowledges that it isn\'t a permanent state - the green will darken and the sense of descent given with the sun going down (like in Introduction, there is a continual lowering).

| Posted on 2013-04-30 | by a guest


.: :.

I think that Blake is discussing homosexuality in the sense he is in love with \"Old John\" and that he wishes that John would stare at him as lustfully as he does to the children on the green.

| Posted on 2012-10-22 | by a guest


.: :.

this poem is a representative to day -mid day & night and reflected on that is beginning of life - growing up -death life to coming to a rest

| Posted on 2012-08-01 | by a guest


.: :.

THE POEM ECHOING GREEN IS CLEAR CONCEPT OF LIFE AND EXPERIANCES OF LIFE.WHEN SUN ARISES THE LIGHTNING SPREADS ALL AROUND AND IT LOOKS VERY BEAUTIFUL.

| Posted on 2011-10-26 | by a guest


.: :.

People may say this is what Blake went through as a child but in his poem Infant Joy it em-plies that life is bad and dull for a child.

| Posted on 2011-10-19 | by a guest


.: :.

Something the others seem to have left out is how it symbolises a different kind of adulthood (experience), not only because Old John is wise instead of experienced,but because of the way the elderly look upon the children, not with envy (as the nurse does in experience) but with joy, they remonise(sorry, can\'t spell!) and enjoy their memories instead of wanting it for themselves. They are benevolent and as the poem shows the cycle of life, they are natural, much more so than the adult figures in experience.

| Posted on 2011-06-14 | by a guest


.: :.

\'The Echoing Green\' is a clear representation of a pastoral idyll where a community meets on the green. The green here represents the idea of a \'common\' where everyone owned the land, along with the echoing sense of community. The reason that this poem is placed in \'Song\'s of innocence\' rather than \'experience\' is clear due to \'Old John with white hair\'. In \'Experience\' Old John would not appear wise, but his age would bare the burden of experience. Instead, here, Old John bares resemblance to the classical pastoral figure of a shepherd, a protective figure who is not restrictive but a man who \'does laugh away care\'.
The oak that they sit under represents England, and the community values within this pastoral society. This is furthered by the form of the poem, it is lyrical in nature with rhyming couplets which add to the sense of community as it is a poem for all to use. It is a clear representation of Blake\'s pastoral idyll. Having not actually left London, this \'green\' is Blake\'s idea of Arcadia.
Although placed in Innocence, the poem is a progression from innocence to experience seen through the progression from light to dark - \'The sun does arise\' to \'the darkening green\'. When the sun is up, there are \'merry bells\' and sports on the green, but the last stanza pictures a \'darkening green\' thus adding a sense of danger, as sport is \'no more seen\'. This darkness is the introduction to a life of experience.

| Posted on 2011-06-06 | by a guest


.: :.

It seems that these posts and inferences are all rather obvious, is there nothing more profound that we can uncover in the poem? I\'ve tried but to read a poem that seems so open feels like a trick?

| Posted on 2011-02-07 | by a guest


.: :.

The Ecchoing Green is a detailed exploration on the cycle of life. Blake uses natural imagery to compensate for the natural growth in a person, physically and mentally. In many cases he uses a rural landscape to compliment the innocence of the 'green' - how child play is completely acceptable and distances us from the urbanised world of pollution and experience.
In literature, spring is often associated with growth, and here we can see that Spring is the season present. Winter is usually linked to death - if the season happened to be winter, Blake would of included negativity as a parallel to this setting.
The word 'Ecchoing' is metaphorically used to describe the echo of life, how our life echoes through different aspects. Our growth and background echoes our individuality in this world - however, this can conincide with experience, we have our own personal experiences to think of who we are.
The elders 'wise' in this poem are looking back with a sense of nostalgia, but they are much more wiser than the children playing sport on the green. Their life is ecchoing for the last time, the children however are only just getting started.

| Posted on 2010-06-13 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem holds so much soul, i don't think it is pedantic in any shape or form, and whoever said it is is just plain wrong and not on a level with Blake!

| Posted on 2010-05-07 | by a guest


.: :.

by UMAR
The poem talks about merry sounds and images which accompany the children playing outdoors. Then, an old man happily remembers when he enjoyed playing with his friends during his own childhood. The last stanza depicts the little ones being weary when the sun has descended and going to their mothers’ laps. No more playing is expected, for it is time to take a break after a long day enjoying games.
The poem follows the structure of a day— 'the sun does arise' in the beginning of the first verse, and 'the sun does descend' in the middle of the third verse. The poem is the contrast of innocence and experience, but also the contrast between perception of joys and sorrows. What is happening on the Green will happen again, shown by the 'old folk' who watch the children and reminisce about their own childhood on the Green. The whole poem is written in 6 sentences with much repetition. The poem could also be attributed to the life of a person— birth, life, death

| Posted on 2010-04-28 | by a guest


.: :.

The Ecchoing Green presents alternative periods of a naturally progressing day. "The Sun Does arise and make happy the skies" is extremely significant in being the first an second lines of the poem as it adds a creates a fresh feel of energy that is felt with the arrival of a new morning and similarly; a new life. This mirrors mankinds dependence on nature, and more specifically the sun, as for a day to begin, and move away from the negativity and evil associated with night, the sun must rise and bring light to the place. However, an alternative outlook could be that as the word "sun" is capitalised with an S, it is a symbol for God. (God is also capitalised) This is not unheard of as the sun is a symbol of godly power and later this idea of God having the capability to burn is seen in "The Little Black Boy". with this religious stance in mind, the sun can be seen as a saviour and protector (as God is) from the evils and uncertainty of night, and brings relief to the people of the Green.
i love the religious analysis that has been put up, i did not think of that before!
Thanks (=

| Posted on 2010-04-16 | by a guest


.: :.

I think that this poem is anlysing the effects of industries at that time and how people were trapped by it. The spring was no more enjoyable for them and the old folk just tried to be happy by remembering the old times when everything and everyone was merry. I think it's beautiful and people should read it.

| Posted on 2010-03-26 | by a guest


.: :.

In this poem Blake shows how humanity can live harmoniously with nature. All industrial outside forces and places of rules and constraint take a backstage seat " the merry bells ring to welcome the spring". also this personifaction shows an innocent life, untaint and unspoilt.
"Old John" also suggests that this is traditional, he is a man of wisdom that has been untainted by experience.

| Posted on 2010-02-24 | by a guest


.: :.

Tbh, i think it's just a silly poem, the deeper meaning is just WANG.

| Posted on 2010-02-09 | by a guest


.: :.

My interpretation of Blake's 'Ecchoing Green' is that it is addressing the disintegration of rural life in Britain. In context to what was going on at the time Blake was extremely weary of the impact Industrialism was having on British society and culture. The ratio of the rural-urban populace was more equaly split before the revolution, however it encouraged urbanisation to large cities like London.
The first two stanza take on the role of the development of youth's lives in a pleasant environment of a village. It begins with a innocent and harmless tone to the poem, but when the end of the third stanza is met we are presented with the final line; 'And sport no more seen on the darkening green'. The change from 'ecchoing' to 'darkening' stands out, it suggests that rural life in the area has slowly deteriorated as people are moving closer to the cities for employment, the green has been cast back into a darker age. Blake may have viewed the revolution as a dark evil that would re-established the culture and society of Britain.

| Posted on 2009-12-29 | by a guest


.: :.

I have studied William Blake's poetry for the past year in Year 12 and have found it really interesting. The Echoing Green by William Blake portrays a day scene. The beginning of the poem starts with the children all joyful and happy and the sun is arising. The 2nd stanza of the poem is the middle of the day and the old folk are commenting on old days and how they used to be able to play and have fun like the young children are now. The last stanza ends with the ending of the day, the children are going to sleep and the sun is going down on the greens. This poem can also be portrayed as the cycle of life. It starts with the birth in spring of the little children and then goes on to the middle age with the older people and the middle of the day. The last stanza then moves it into the last section of life- death. As the "sun goes down on the green" this cnan be interpreted as being the life finally coming to rest.
Any ways this is just an interpretation, open to adjustment!!:-)

| Posted on 2009-07-23 | by a guest


.: :.

i think that this poem by Blake is actually depicting a sexual encounter, which starts full of energy as the first stanza suggests, but by the third stanza, after the climax, both become 'weary'. 'darkening green' the last line is an invitation for sleep to end the sport of the day.
by nick choofon

| Posted on 2009-04-26 | by a guest


.: :.

i deem this poem rather shallow and pedantic. I visually noticed the advanced juxtoposition of the interchangable membranes coming across for this literary work of art... Thanks Billiam

| Posted on 2009-01-06 | by a guest


.: Biblical reference :.

The intextuality in the poem between The Bible and The Garden of Eden as stated above in the forst quote is a perfect angle to view the poem from. Also there is no direct biblical reference, the idea is still present in the readers mind. Despite the fact that there is no "snake" present, i think that time in itself could be the "subject which spoils everything", in this case it is the happy energetic childhood

| Posted on 2008-05-16 | by a guest


.: Snake :.

I love the idea of the life cycle and the renewal of the young generation, and I feel it connects with the title perfectly, as the Green is still Echoing with the sound of lost youth.

I also note that this poem seems to show intertextuality with the Bible and the Garen of Eden. I know Blake was into religion, and the Green shows the paradise world before the snake comes and spoils it. I know a snake isn't featured in this poem, but Blake does often use snakes to symbolise experience and the ruining of things, such as in 'the sick rose' the worm as the phallic symbol destroys the woman. Maybe Blake should have added a snake here :P



| Posted on 2007-05-22 | by a guest


.: nurse :.

my response to that is simular to others that i have read on here. I like the rhythme of this poem, the rhyming couplets gives it a sort of, harmonious (spelling!?!?) feel to fit with the countryside life.
The other idea i thought i'd add was that of the Oak. It represents strength and protection, complementing the elderly folk, whoses traditions can protect the community today.
That is all!

Louisa's interpretation.

| Posted on 2007-05-16 | by a guest


.: a critical appreciation :.

The echoing green discribes the livespan of a person - the morning, afternoon, and evening/night, in a persons life.
morning = birth & childhood, the energy & vitality of childhood.
afternoon = middle age
evening/night = old age & death

Blake brings out the difference between childhood and old age. he describes three pictures: in the first stanza nature comes to life early in the morning. the sun rises and the birds (skylark & trush) sing merrily. even the bells ring merrily (the bells cheerfull sound) these reflect energy, happiness and freedom. the sound refects the children's happiness and playing.
Old John and the old folk in the second stanza watch the children play and think nostalgically of their own past when they ''girls and boys'' in their youth time where seen on The Echoing Green. the oak tree is equivalent to old age. the old folk cherish their memories and the tone in this stanza changes. there is a strong hint of unhappiness, sadness, nostalgia, weariness and apathy. the old folk are compared to ''birds who are ready for rest''. childhood progresses into youth, adulthood, old age and eventually death.
the poem is rich in imaginary and stylistic devices. the words rhyme in pairs aa, bb, cc etc. eg. arise-skies.
the rhythm in the first stanza is fast showing the energy and vitality of children. the rhythm of the second stanza is slower to reflect old age, weariness and tireness.

by: xilla, malta

| Posted on 2007-02-07 | by a guest


.: a critical appreciation :.

The echoing green discribes the livespan of a person - the morning, afternoon, and evening/night, in a persons life.
morning = birth & childhood, the energy & vitality of childhood.
afternoon = middle age
evening/night = old age & death

Blake brings out the difference between childhood and old age. he describes three pictures: in the first stanza nature comes to life early in the morning. the sun rises and the birds (skylark & trush) sing merrily. even the bells ring merrily (the bells cheerfull sound) these reflect energy, happiness and freedom. the sound refects the children's happiness and playing.
Old John and the old folk in the second stanza watch the children play and think nostalgically of their own past when they ''girls and boys'' in their youth time where seen on The Echoing Green. the oak tree is equivalent to old age. the old folk cherish their memories and the tone in this stanza changes. there is a strong hint of unhappiness, sadness, nostalgia, weariness and apathy. the old folk are compared to ''birds who are ready for rest''. childhood progresses into youth, adulthood, old age and eventually death.
the poem is rich in imaginary and stylistic devices. the words rhyme in pairs aa, bb, cc etc. eg. arise-skies.
the rhythm in the first stanza is fast showing the energy and vitality of children. the rhythm of the second stanza is slower to reflect old age, weariness and tireness.

| Posted on 2007-02-07 | by a guest


.: The Echoing Green :.

Whoever wrote the second post on this thread obviously did not study the poem as the analysis is simply copied from the 'York Notes Advanced' description of the poem. I thought that this site might hold personal responses to the poem rather than plagiarism.
I have noticed when reading the poem that there is a lightness in the rhythm and unstressed syllables regularly come in pairs. Throughout the the poem there also seems to be a rapid recurrence of the rhyming sounds.

| Posted on 2006-01-27 | by Approved Guest


.: The Echoing Green :.

No No No. The echoing green depcicts the cycle of day and night to show the progression from youth (a state of innocence, hence the "bells chearful sound") to adulthood (a state of experience, hence the darkening green".) Note how he uses the idea of the sun arising and descending to show this. It would be wrong to say that Blake cannot see the inevitablity of age, just look at the lines"soon they all say, Such were the joys" but we can say is that he views this progression as something dark and disturbing. The reference to "Green" in the last line is not one that inspires confidence but instead it has a rather ominious feel to it "the darkening green", suggesting that beyond childhood and therefore innocence lies a state of darkeness and corruption.

| Posted on 2005-05-23 | by Approved Guest


.: The Echoing Green :.

The poem depicyts a conventional villiage scene in which a whole day's cycle is portrayed.
Within it youth and age all have parts to play alongside the birds and other creatures of Spring.
The last part of the the second stanza consists of reminiscence by the 'old folk' in connection with the play of the youngsters. Are we meant to see in this a natural development from youth to old age or see it as a kind of nostagia?
There are two slighty disturbing signs that the world of the villiage green is under threat.
The first would arise from a different reading of the last two lines, whereby the idea of spots being 'no more seen' and the green itself 'darkening' might not signify the natural ending of the day, but also a possible ending of a certain tradition, teh coming in of night to menace our safety and, more importantly, that of our children.
The second might occur to us as we contemplatethe title of the poem: why is it an 'echoing' green? Is it because id reverbrates with laughter and play, or is it because it continues to resound with the 'echo' of something either already or imminently lost?
Also, 'Old John' was a conventional pastoral figure in eighteenth- century poetry.

| Posted on 2005-05-03 | by Approved Guest


.: Aren't we all? :.


The poem generally encompasses a conventional day of society in a village. With the old and the young all having a place in society, while in a city this may not be possible. It is the last line of the poem that the reader may find disturbing as "sport no more seen/On the darkening green" could be taken to mean one of two things. Is Blake simply talking about the end of the day? Or the end of this idealistic country life? Does Blake fear city life being the only way of life? Which for Blake, living in London except for a stay in Felpham, was his main experience.

| Posted on 2005-04-09 | by Approved Guest




Post your Analysis




Message

Free Online Education from Top Universities

Yes! It's true. College Education is now free!







Most common keywords

Echoing Green, The Analysis William Blake critical analysis of poem, review school overview. Analysis of the poem. literary terms. Definition terms. Why did he use? short summary describing. Echoing Green, The Analysis William Blake Characters archetypes. Sparknotes bookrags the meaning summary overview critique of explanation pinkmonkey. Quick fast explanatory summary. pinkmonkey free cliffnotes cliffnotes ebook pdf doc file essay summary literary terms analysis professional definition summary synopsis sinopsis interpretation critique Echoing Green, The Analysis William Blake itunes audio book mp4 mp3 mit ocw Online Education homework forum help



Poetry 85
Poetry 64
Poetry 191
Poetry 93
Poetry 87
Poetry 109
Poetry 36
Poetry 116
Poetry 97
Poetry 164
Poetry 78
Poetry 77
Poetry 136
Poetry 56
Poetry 63
Poetry 189
Poetry 114
Poetry 166
Poetry 67
Poetry 114