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To My Sister Analysis



Author: Poetry of William Wordsworth Type: Poetry Views: 1607

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It is the first mild day of March:

Each minute sweeter than before

The redbreast sings from the tall larch

That stands beside our door.



There is a blessing in the air,

Which seems a sense of joy to yield

To the bare trees, and mountains bare,

And grass in the green field.



My sister! ('tis a wish of mine)

Now that our morning meal is done,

Make haste, your morning task resign;

Come forth and feel the sun.



Edward will come with you;--and, pray,

Put on with speed your woodland dress;

And bring no book: for this one day

We'll give to idleness.



No joyless forms shall regulate

Our living calendar:

We from to-day, my Friend, will date

The opening of the year.



Love, now a universal birth,

From heart to heart is stealing,

From earth to man, from man to earth:

--It is the hour of feeling.



One moment now may give us more

Than years of toiling reason:

Our minds shall drink at every pore

The spirit of the season.



Some silent laws our hearts will make,

Which they shall long obey:

We for the year to come may take

Our temper from to-day.



And from the blessed power that rolls

About, below, above,

We'll frame the measure of our souls:

They shall be tuned to love.



Then come, my Sister! come, I pray,

With speed put on your woodland dress;

And bring no book: for this one day

We'll give to idleness.





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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

I simply wonder who 'Edward' is in the poem.
He could not be a smaller brother, for there is only Christopher.
Could it be Dorothy's boy friend or husband?
Not a dog, surely?
At the age of 43 I've only just discovered Wordsworth.
But then again, being Belgian is a great excuse...
Lies Martens

| Posted on 2014-07-11 | by a guest


.: :.

Wordsworth here advocates wise-passiveness, that is, the world of feeling alone without judging, in Man�s contact with Nature. The poem has thus a close affinity with his poems �Expostulation and Reply� and �The Tables Turned�. Wordsworth and his sister would abandon themselves into the flow of Nature which rolls about, below and above.
The poem has its specific message directly stated. Its tone is jovial, but its purpose is serious.

| Posted on 2011-06-06 | by a guest


.: :.

Questo pu essere solo l'analisi della scrittura. N. richieste di spiegazioni o commenti di breve permesso. A causa di messaggi spam inviati sono moderati prima.

| Posted on 2010-04-22 | by a guest


.: :.

To My Sister
Leave your books behind and come forth outdoors into the world of Nature, so urges Wordsworth to his sister Dorothy on the first mild day of March.

With the onset of Spring there is a joy pervading all Nature, throbbing with new life after the bleak bareness of winter. The harbinger of Sprng is the robin perching on the larch tree outside the poets door. The objects of Nature now have both silent and noisy communion with each other. The pleasant air brings a blessing to trees and mountains and the grass.

The poet invites his sister to come with him from the breakfast-table into Nature outdoors. He wishes that she would come forth and feel the sun. She should wear her woodland dress to harmonize with the simple current of joy that pulsates through both Nature and the poets being. On this day she should take a holiday from domestic chores, and they should celebrate the awakening of life in Spring in open communion with the elemental forms of Nature.

Love, now a universal birth,
From heart to heart is stealing,
From earth to man, from man to earth:
It is the hour of feeling.

In such a time one intense moment may store up treasures within us that bookish labor could never produce. The deep impressions left on our mind by the vibrant forces of Nature will guide us in future years. Here the poem builds towards the sublime in a peception of the blessed power that frames the human soul to love. It is an affirmation of personal and cosmic integrity.

The advent of Spring so enraptures Wordsworth that he wishes to have a new calendar with the dating device to be regulated by the procession of seasons headed by Spring.

Wordsworth here advocates wise-passiveness, that is, the world of feeling alone without judging, in Mans contact with Nature. The poem has thus a close affinity with his poems Expostulation and Reply and The Tables Turned. Wordsworth and his sister would abandon themselves into the flow of Nature which rolls about, below and above.

The poem has its specific message directly stated. Its tone is jovial, but its purpose is serious.

| Posted on 2009-12-08 | by a guest




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