famous poetry
| Famous Poetry | Roleplay | Free Video Tutorials | Online Poetry Club | Free Education | Best of Youtube | Ear Training

The Triple Fool Analysis



Author: Poetry of John Donne Type: Poetry Views: 2170

Sponsored Links

I am two fools, I know-For loving, and for saying so

In whining poetry;

But where's that wiseman that would not be I,

If she would not deny?

Then, as th' earths inward narrow crooked lanes

Do purge sea waters fretful salt away,

I thought, if I could draw my pains

Through rhymes vexation, I should them allay.

Grief brought to numbers cannot be so fierce,

For he tames it that fetters it in verse.But when I have done so,

Some man, his art and voice to show,

Doth set and sing my pain,

And, by delighting many, frees again

Grief, which verse did restrain.

To Love and Grief tribute of verse belongs,

But not of such as pleases when 'tis read;

Both are increased by such songs,

For both their triumphs so are published;

And I, which was two fooles, do so grow three;

Who are a little wise, the best fools be.






Sponsor



Learn to Play Songs by Ear: Ear Training

122 Free Video Tutorials

[Video Tutorial] How to build google chrome extensions

Please add me on youtube. I make free educational video tutorials on youtube such as Basic HTML and CSS.

Free Online Education from Top Universities

Yes! It's true. Online College Education is now free!



||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

I believe that John Donne is expressing the grief and pain of rejection. He is a triple fool for 1) loving someone 2) writing about love and 3) for writing about love and thinking it would help heal his pain. "for both their triumphs so are published./ And I, which was two fools, do so grow three."

| Posted on 2016-04-24 | by a guest


.: :.

I think this poem simply means. That the man struggles to get over her love rejection. Wanting to set himself free of the pain. He liberates his thoughts into this poem. However this backfires because the poem is so good and relatable. That many people recite it, and by doing so. Increase the grief he feels, or revive it. He is a wise fool, because he is able to recognize the fool he is. I can relate to this poem very much. Because i myself have made a fool of myself. Sharing my pain wanting to heal it, and in return it gets worse.

| Posted on 2014-10-30 | by a guest


.: :.

Yep, one of the above has some sense to it: in the last line the speaker complains that the he was not even a little wise; if he had been, he would have refrained from publishing his pleasing poem. A little wisdom would have kept him from becoming the third kind of fool, and possibly even the second kind, the writer of whining poetry. Then he could have just been a fool once over for loving, and maybe a loving fool, wise enough not to write or speak of it (I have done a braver thing/Than all the Worthies did;/And yet, a braver thence doth spring/Which is, to keep that hid), is the best kind of fool.

| Posted on 2013-10-29 | by a guest


.: :.

Maybe the third fool is him knowing that he has twice a fool but accepting it. He\'s a fool because he accepts the other two and still grieves for his love.

| Posted on 2011-12-27 | by a guest


.: :.

`I think that this poem Is very witty and fun. It doesn’t always flow with it’s rythmn perfectecly, but it does still come off as very fluid and fun. And the only real difficulty in interpreting it is that he makes half of what he’s saying, the reasons he is two fools, so obvious. In fact he lays it out right in the first line. But the third reason is much harder to identify.
The first two reasons he is a fool is because he as loved someone , and the second because he wrote a poem about it. The reason he would see the first as so foolish is because he loved someone and then was most likely rejected. This can be confirmed because “loving” can be past tense and because he discusses his “grief”. And the second is foolish because he then wrote a poem which he describes as “whining” about it. So this means that he was rejected, he wrote and entirely different poem about it which on review seems silly and foolish. And the third reason he is a fool is hard to catch but it is there. The third reason he is a fool is because he thought he could by sharing his grief in a new poem, this one, he could alleviate. He thought himself wise, however after having shared he finds that each repetition of it only renews the wound left not only by that poem; but by the poem he wrote previously.
So this poor fellow has to with each reading/singing of his poem endure love with the reminder of the first poem and grief because of the second. Not only that but since his love is increased with the constant reminder of the first, the reading of his grief is all the more amplified. So that he is a third fool for thinking himself wise and sharing his grief. Equaling in total , the writing of three different poems by the same guy.

| Posted on 2011-02-11 | by a guest


.: :.

I see the third reason for him being a fool to be his making the poem "such as pleases when 'tis read" or a good poem, because it causes people to recite it and set free his grief. This then explains the last line, that he was a little wise in being able to make a good poem, but that made him the bigger fool because in doing so he has caused himself more grief. Those who have the means to do some things well can better make mistakes.

| Posted on 2010-03-23 | by a guest


.: :.

I think a simple interpertation of the poem is nessassary. The poem could possibly mean that The people who are wise and smart are the real fools of the world becuase of there disire to know the truth of ther world.

| Posted on 2009-04-29 | by a guest


.: :.

OK, these are all great, but I'm thinking that he's saying in the last line, not that because he is wise that he is a great fool, but because he put it into verse and thought *that* wise that he makes himself even more foolish.
What he did was wise, though he though himself foolish for writing the poem, it actually did help him. However, because he wrote it down, he calls himself foolish for allowing it to be read and circled back to him. Initially, the therapy of transffering his suffering into verse left him feeling better, but that wisdom backfired and when he heard it fired back at him, he felt all of the emotions he had purged again.
Since his wisdom backfired, he feels to be an even greater fool.

| Posted on 2009-03-15 | by a guest


.: :.

Donne is stating that he was a fool for loving (unrequited love) and that he was a fool for writing it down "in whining poetry". He compares his poetry to nature in how the earth leaches salt from sea water the same way it does his tears.
Then someone set his poem in a song (no copyrights in the Renaissance!); he's torn between mortification that someone's singing his pain to the world and amusement that people empathize with and listen to his poem, so much so that he wrote another poem about it. The third fool is the fool who recognizes that he is a fool.
Written in thanks to Ms. Murphy.

| Posted on 2008-09-25 | by a guest


.: :.

I believe every assertions I will support in the following are absolutely correct (I am Professor Dodo currently teaching in Duguwaga): John Donne has written "The Triple Fool" with lots of powerful insights. He states his opinions about wise/unwise men in an very indirect manner. However, he believes he is already a fool, since he has loved, and has stated that he is a fool. In conclusion, Donne himself states that he is a very wise men since he is a fool, and fools that are wise often states that they are a fool. Any concerns, opinions, questions, contradictory statements may be intercommunicated through a source of media called the "Email."
My Email is: *

| Posted on 2008-06-23 | by a guest


.: :.

I believe every assertions I will support in the following are absolutely correct (I am Professor Dodo currently teaching in Duguwaga): John Donne has written "The Triple Fool" with lots of powerful insights. He states his opinions about wise/unwise men in an very indirect manner. However, he believes he is already a fool, since he has loved, and has stated that he is a fool. In conclusion, Donne himself states that he is a very wise men since he is a fool, and fools that are wise often states that they are a fool. Any concerns, opinions, questions, contradictory statements may be intercommunicated through a source of media called the "Email."
My Email is: *

| Posted on 2008-06-23 | by a guest


.: :.

I believe every assertions I will support in the following are absolutely correct (I am Professor Dodo currently teaching in Duguwaga): John Donne has written "The Triple Fool" with lots of powerful insights. He states his opinions about wise/unwise men in an very indirect manner. However, he believes he is already a fool, since he has loved, and has stated that he is a fool. In conclusion, Donne himself states that he is a very wise men since he is a fool, and fools that are wise often states that they are a fool. Any concerns, opinions, questions, contradictory statements may be intercommunicated through a source of media called the "Email."
My Email is: *

| Posted on 2008-06-23 | by a guest


.: :.

I believe every assertions I will support in the following are absolutely correct (I am Professor Dodo currently teaching in Duguwaga): John Donne has written "The Triple Fool" with lots of powerful insights. He states his opinions about wise/unwise men in an very indirect manner. However, he believes he is already a fool, since he has loved, and has stated that he is a fool. In conclusion, Donne himself states that he is a very wise men since he is a fool, and fools that are wise often states that they are a fool. Any concerns, opinions, questions, contradictory statements may be intercommunicated through a source of media called the "Email."
My Email is: *

| Posted on 2008-06-23 | by a guest


.: :.

I believe every assertions I will support in the following are absolutely correct (I am Professor Dodo currently teaching in Duguwaga): John Donne has written "The Triple Fool" with lots of powerful insights. He states his opinions about wise/unwise men in an very indirect manner. However, he believes he is already a fool, since he has loved, and has stated that he is a fool. In conclusion, Donne himself states that he is a very wise men since he is a fool, and fools that are wise often states that they are a fool. Any concerns, opinions, questions, contradictory statements may be intercommunicated through a source of media called the "Email."
My Email is: *

| Posted on 2008-06-23 | by a guest


.: :.

"The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool."
-- Touchstone, As You Like It, Act V, Scene I.
excuse my previous butchering of the quote

| Posted on 2008-05-01 | by a guest


.: :.

the last line is an allusion to shakespeare (who actually lived at the same time as Donne)---"The fool thinketh that he is wise, whereas the wise man knoweth that he [himself] is a fool"

| Posted on 2008-05-01 | by a guest


.: hi :.

i really like the second poster's interpretation, and about the "allusion," i think he (or she) just meant that the two concepts were thematically related. probably just a slip of the tongue, yet great connection nonetheless.

| Posted on 2008-04-03 | by a guest


.: :.

I disagree with a protion of the 2nd commenter's critique; "He follows to say that he would still not be wise, even if "she" returned his love, which sh apparently does not."
I would argue that in those specific verses he is not calling himself unwise, but say, if this poem were to win the heart of the one he loved, it could be argued that he is, in fact, wise.

| Posted on 2008-03-31 | by a guest


.: .: :. :.

I very much agree with the below Guest except for one detail. While the quote "A little learning is a dangerous thing. Drink deep, or taste not the pierian spring," (First used by Alexander Pope) serves as a fabulous comparison to Donne's "Who are a little wise, the best fools be," it is not being alluded to in The Triple Fool, simply because Alexander Pope was born 57 years after the death of Donne.

| Posted on 2007-10-10 | by a guest


.: :.

I generally agree with "Approved Guest"'s interpretation, save the last line. The first clause says tht he is two times a fool, a fool for loving, and a fool for admitting it in emo. poetry. He follows to say that he would still not be wise, even if "she" returned his love, which sh apparently does not. Therefor, he says, he tries to release his emotions by transferring them into a poem, utilising chemistry-like transitive properties to liberate his emotions from his body onto the paper. However, he anticipates that no sooner than that will be accomplished that "some man" to show off his musical and theatrical abilities will turn his poem into a performance, and by acting the sorrow out, will again release the sorrow back into the atmosphere, with even more puissance, where it will find its old home in the author's body, making him again, a fool. The last line, which says, "Who are a little wise, the best fools be" is an allusion to "A little learning is a dangerous thing. Drink deep, or taste not the pierian spring," emphasising that he is not the best "kind of fool," but, rather, the biggest fool of all, with enough knnowledge to know better, but not actually knowing any better.


| Posted on 2007-07-25 | by a guest


.: :.

vs. 1-5: He is saying he is a fool for 2 reasons: loving and saying he's a fool in complaining songs.(where is the wise man)

vs. 6-11: Thouht tht if he put his pains in verse the grief won't be so bad

vs. 12-16: Says that people who want to boast of his or her singing skills make the love and griet where vers kept in make it bad again for the author when he hears it.

vs. 17-21: poetry is for love and grief and not for pleasing things, but songs make love and grief even worse so by writing love or depressing songs. He is now another fool.

Vs. 22: he ends with saying he is a little wise and therefore one of the best kind of fools.

| Posted on 2005-05-21 | by Approved Guest




Post your Analysis




Message

Free Online Education from Top Universities

Yes! It's true. College Education is now free!







Most common keywords

The Triple Fool Analysis John Donne critical analysis of poem, review school overview. Analysis of the poem. literary terms. Definition terms. Why did he use? short summary describing. The Triple Fool Analysis John Donne Characters archetypes. Sparknotes bookrags the meaning summary overview critique of explanation pinkmonkey. Quick fast explanatory summary. pinkmonkey free cliffnotes cliffnotes ebook pdf doc file essay summary literary terms analysis professional definition summary synopsis sinopsis interpretation critique The Triple Fool Analysis John Donne itunes audio book mp4 mp3 mit ocw Online Education homework forum help



Poetry 145
Poetry 95
Poetry 120
Poetry 146
Poetry 119
Poetry 176
Poetry 113
Poetry 174
Poetry 205
Poetry 67
Poetry 131
Poetry 105
Poetry 91
Poetry 147
Poetry 29
Poetry 42
Poetry 21
Poetry 23
Poetry 216
Poetry 200