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West London Analysis



Author: Poetry of Matthew Arnold Type: Poetry Views: 674

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Crouch'd on the pavement close by Belgrave Square

A tramp I saw, ill, moody, and tongue-tied;

A babe was in her arms, and at her side

A girl; their clothes were rags, their feet were bare.

Some labouring men, whose work lay somewhere there,

Pass'd opposite; she touch'd her girl, who hied

Across, and begg'd and came back satisfied.

The rich she had let pass with frozen stare.

Thought I: Above her state this spirit towers;

She will not ask of aliens, but of friends,

Of sharers in a common human fate.

She turns from that cold succour, which attneds

The unknown little from the unknowing great,

And points us to a better time than ours.





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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

This isn\'t helpful as it is not an analysis of West London by Matthew Arnold.

| Posted on 2011-04-27 | by a guest


.: :.

Apologies for posting the above message twice. I have no idea how this happened and I have no idea how to delete the repeated prose-poem.-Ron Price, Tasmania

| Posted on 2010-09-12 | by a guest


.: Matthew Arnold :.

Poets and writers often interpret criticism of their poems, their works, as criticism of themselves. It is for this reason among others that I prefer a more gentle form of critique than the one taken up by Charles Dickens. He observed that criticism “means saying about an author the very things that would have made him jump out of his boots." Too heavy for me, Charles. The approach I take to criticism of others, and the one I would enjoy being taken to my work,is based on Matthew Arnold's precept of letting the mind play freely around a subject in which there has been much endeavor and little attempt at perspective.I have certainly taken much thought in creating and outlining a perspective on my life and this description of it but, as yet, I have not enjoyed the free play of other minds and their perspectives in any organized way. This is not surprising given the dearth of autobiographical writing in the Bahá’í community and the virtual absense of any formal criticism of it.

The kind of criticism of my work that would benefit both me and others, is one that deals with the whole work of scholarship and taste that is concerned with literature and is a part of what is variously called liberal education, culture, or the study of the humanities. Criticism is itself a structure of thought and knowledge existing in its own right, with some measure of independence from the art it deals with.

There is no real correlation between the merits of art and its public reception. Criticism can talk but all the arts are dumb. In painting, sculpture, or music it is easy enough to see that the art shows forth its wares, but it cannot say anything. However surprising it sounds to call writers and poets inarticulate or speechless, there is a most important sense in which their essays and poems are as silent as statues. I would apply the words "mute," "dumb," and "wordless" to what I write. The artist, as John Stuart Mill saw in a wonderful flash of critical insight, is not heard but overhead. If my writings come alive it is in the reactions of readers. If they do not, they remain dumb and mute.

However loudly some poets, for example Rabindranath Tagore, proclaim the poem to be separate from the poet, people respond to poems as if they are real people speaking. I became conscious of this at the start of my massive production of poetry in 1992-3. For more than a decade I had written a good deal of awefully complex stuff and some readers told me so. In those ten years, too, I had written a first edition of this memoir, but it was so tedious, so boring, I could hardly bear reading it. I was more than a little conscious of Tolstoi's remarks that: “an artist teaches far more by his mere background and properties, his landscapes, his costume, his idiom and technique—all the part of the work, in short, of which he is probably entirely unconscious, than by the elaborate and pompous moral dicta he fondly imagines to be his opinions." This background and its properties had to be changed.


| Posted on 2007-08-23 | by a guest


.: :.

STAGIRIUS

In 1844 the British poet Matthew Arnold(1822-1888), who had started writing poetry in his teens, began writing a poem entitled Stagirius.1 That same year Arnold graduated from Oxford and began teaching the classics at Rugby School. Arnold’s poem Stagirius was not published until 1849 and then in 1855. In this poem Arnold asks release from doubt and spiritual pride. In 1857 he was appointed Professor of Poetry at Oxford. His poetry reveals the spiritual unrest and distraction of the age and his attraction to certain Greek and Roman guides and modern poetic teachers. –Ron Price wit thanks to “Selections from the Prose Works of Matthew Arnold,” The Project Gutenburg Ebook, 2004.

They were busy years for you,
the most turbulent and the most
glorious in the greatest cycle of
religious history, they are, too,
the most spectacular, the most
tragic and the most eventful….

But, as you say, Stagirius was mad
and the world was mad, you knew
only too well with the severity of
that inward tempest. That uniform
attachment to a simple model with
its abstruse and arbitrary eschatology
had become ridiculous. You were not
fit for any evangelical poverty, for any
evangelical anything; you could not
consume your life in penance, solitude
and religious zeal, you had too sociable
a demeanour, you sought that wide and
luminous view with its sweet calm and
sought a oneness with the life of humankind.

Ron Price
6 April 2007

1 Stagirius was a young friend of Chrysostom.(349-407 AD) They belonged to a brotherhood of monastics. He was not able to endure the ascetic disciplines of the monastic order because of his affluent background. He lived at the time of the famous ascetic Simeon the Stylite who has become famous in history for his asceticism.


| Posted on 2007-04-07 | by a guest


.: :.

STAGIRIUS

In 1844 the British poet Matthew Arnold(1822-1888), who had started writing poetry in his teens, began writing a poem entitled Stagirius.1 That same year Arnold graduated from Oxford and began teaching the classics at Rugby School. Arnold’s poem Stagirius was not published until 1849 and then in 1855. In this poem Arnold asks release from doubt and spiritual pride. In 1857 he was appointed Professor of Poetry at Oxford. His poetry reveals the spiritual unrest and distraction of the age and his attraction to certain Greek and Roman guides and modern poetic teachers. –Ron Price wit thanks to “Selections from the Prose Works of Matthew Arnold,” The Project Gutenburg Ebook, 2004.

They were busy years for you,
the most turbulent and the most
glorious in the greatest cycle of
religious history, they are, too,
the most spectacular, the most
tragic and the most eventful….

But, as you say, Stagirius was mad
and the world was mad, you knew
only too well with the severity of
that inward tempest. That uniform
attachment to a simple model with
its abstruse and arbitrary eschatology
had become ridiculous. You were not
fit for any evangelical poverty, for any
evangelical anything; you could not
consume your life in penance, solitude
and religious zeal, you had too sociable
a demeanour, you sought that wide and
luminous view with its sweet calm and
sought a oneness with the life of humankind.

Ron Price
6 April 2007

1 Stagirius was a young friend of Chrysostom.(349-407 AD) They belonged to a brotherhood of monastics. He was not able to endure the ascetic disciplines of the monastic order because of his affluent background. He lived at the time of the famous ascetic Simeon the Stylite who has become famous in history for his asceticism.


| Posted on 2007-04-07 | by a guest




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