famous poetry
| Famous Poetry | Roleplay | Free Video Tutorials | Online Poetry Club | Free Education | Best of Youtube | Ear Training

Holy Thursday (Experience) Analysis



Author: poem of William Blake Type: poem Views: 53


Is this a holy thing to see.
In a rich and fruitful land.
Babes reduced to misery.
Fed with cold and usurous hand?

Is that trembling cry a song?
Can it be a song of joy?
And so many children poor?
It is a land of poverty!

And their sun does never shine.
And their fields are bleak & bare.
And their ways are fill'd with thorns
It is eternal winter there.

For where-e'er the sun does shine.
And where-e'er the rain does fall:
Babe can never hunger there,
Nor poverty the mind appall.

Sponsor


122 Free Video Tutorials

[Video Tutorial] How to build google chrome extensions

Please add me on youtube. I make free educational video tutorials on youtube such as Basic HTML and CSS.

Free Online Education from Top Universities

Yes! It's true. Online College Education is now free!



||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||




.: :.

Blake\'s use of rhetorical questions addresses the audience directly and highlights the unequal distribution of power in the 18th century \"Is this a holy thing to see, in a rich and fruitful land:babes reduced to misery\". Blake\'s diction choice of \"Holy\" highlights the hypocrisy of religion and how they are being sacrilegious as they are not dealing with these inequalities but have resigned their duty of care and feed them with a \"cold and usurous hand\". This symbolises how organised religion gives off the pretense of benevolent charity but is really just masking the exploitation of the impoverished children who were orphaned or abandoned by their parents. This poem very much echos the marxist thought, as do many of his other poems such as: the chimney sweeper and London, however this is much more evident in the two final stanzas symbolic of the contrast between the reality of the children \"their sun does never shine...it is eternal winter there\" and religions promise of a perfect world if the children do as they are told and accept their suffering and inferior status \"where\'er the sun does shine....babe can never hunger there, nor poverty the mind appal\". As it says in the bible \"blessed are the meek for they shall inherit the earth\". As George Norton suggests: \"Religion is active in the children\'s oppression because it makes them promises about the afterlife rather than dealing with the injustice on earth\". The vision of heaven is a bleak contrast with the children\'s reality on earth. GGE (: x

| Posted on 2011-06-12 | by a guest


.: :.

Blake\'s use of rhetorical questions addresses the audience directly and highlights the unequal distribution of power in the 18th century \"Is this a holy thing to see, in a rich and fruitful land:babes reduced to misery\". Blake\'s diction choice of \"Holy\" highlights the hypocrisy of religion and how they are being sacrilegious as they are not dealing with these inequalities but have resigned their duty of care and feed them with a \"cold and usurous hand\". This symbolises how organised religion gives off the pretense of benevolent charity but is really just masking the exploitation of the impoverished children who were orphaned or abandoned by their parents. This poem very much echos the marxist thought, as do many of his other poems such as: the chimney sweeper and London, however this is much more evident in the two final stanzas symbolic of the contrast between the reality of the children \"their sun does never shine...it is eternal winter there\" and religions promise of a perfect world if the children do as they are told and accept their suffering and inferior status \"where\'er the sun does shine....babe can never hunger there, nor poverty the mind appal\". As it says in the bible \"blessed are the meek for they shall inherit the earth\". As George Norton suggests: \"Religion is active in the children\'s oppression because it makes them promises about the afterlife rather than dealing with the injustice on earth\". The vision of heaven is a bleak contrast with the children\'s reality on earth.

| Posted on 2011-06-12 | by a guest


.: :.

This guys post is awesome! please post more so i can understand the last 2 stanzas :)

| Posted on 2010-03-10 | by a guest


.: :.

In "Holy Thursday" Blake expresses feelings towards the society around him. England in the 18th Century, and the emotional, spiritual and moral poverty.
In the first stanza, Blake uses the word ''holy'',
''Is this a holy thing to see...''
He uses the word "holy" as he feels people are being sacrilegious to the country.
In stanza one, Blake describes the land,
''In a rich and fruitful land...''
"Rich" is the adjective used to describe the countries material things. "Fruitful" could mean it is an agricultural and productive place. Another possibility is that it could represent temptation or corruption, like Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden.
In stanza one Blake uses the words "reduced to misery" possibly representing the uneven distribution of wealth and power.
''Babes reduced to misery...'
England was a rich country, yet children as young as four years old were working in factories.
At the end of the first stanza, Blake says the disadvantaged children are "fed with a cold and usurous hand",
''Fed with cold and usurous hand?''
"Cold" could mean insensitive, unloving and callous. The use of the word "usurous" might mean that the people who give money or feed the children are the people who want something in return. Blake believed wholeheartedly that charity was wrong anyway, his reason being that it should not be needed, people should not be allowed to become so poor in the "rich and fruitful land" of England.
The second stanza is more Blake's disbelief than his anger,
''Is that trembling cry a song!
Can it be a song of joy?
And so many children poor,
It is a land of poverty!''
Blake seems stunned that despite their lives of ''misery'', the children are expected to sing "'"songs of joy"'", or hymns, in praise of God and their supposed privilege of education. Blake hears the cries of the children and asks the reader if it can be a song because there is so many children crying that it sounds like a song. He also asks if it can be a song of joy, that the children are singing for joy. He says that there are so many children that are more, he says that the land is poor so therefore it must be called ''land of poverty''.

| Posted on 2008-07-06 | by a guest




Post your Analysis




Message

Free Online Education from Top Universities

Yes! It's true. College Education is now free!







Most common keywords

Holy Thursday (Experience) Analysis William Blake critical analysis of poem, review school overview. Analysis of the poem. literary terms. Definition terms. Why did he use? short summary describing. Holy Thursday (Experience) Analysis William Blake Characters archetypes. Sparknotes bookrags the meaning summary overview critique of explanation online education meaning metaphors symbolism characterization itunes. Quick fast explanatory summary. pinkmonkey free cliffnotes cliffnotes ebook pdf doc file essay summary literary terms analysis professional definition summary synopsis sinopsis interpretation critique Holy Thursday (Experience) Analysis William Blake itunes audio book mp4 mp3



Poetry 170
Poetry 173
Poetry 10
Poetry 102
Poetry 153
Poetry 47
Poetry 91
Poetry 55
Poetry 138
Poetry 29
Poetry 48
Poetry 112
Poetry 65
Poetry 195
Poetry 205
Poetry 74
Poetry 201
Poetry 68
Poetry 112
Poetry 72