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In Flanders Fields Analysis



Author: Poetry of John McCrae Type: Poetry Views: 2460



In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead.Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie,
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.


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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||




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what does the word "sparrows" represent in the peom

| Posted on 2013-12-19 | by a guest


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A very nice poem with lots of emotions fulfiled and it makes you feel motivated in the last paragraph.
'Poppies grow' more poppies growing which means increasing death of soldier.
Dis poem enlightens ur heart

| Posted on 2013-11-26 | by a guest


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If you\'re writing this for an essay it may be difficult to explore the different connotations Mcrae introduces. I\'m doing this for As English lit and if i used this in a Q i\'d probably just say that it is a patriotic poem just because its easier to contrast for example, with Sassoons or Wilfred Owen\'s work.
Mcrae uses third person plural pronouns to convey unity \'We\' \'Our\' etc, and perhaps plays on the guilt of men that didnt fight in the war. It has a circuar structure so could portray that he has no dissilusionment to what he believes. \'Take up our quarrell\' is an imperitive instruction so he is either begging people to avenge the dead or wanting people to fight for England. \'We shall not sleep...\' puts responsibility onto soldiers that may be read it and conveys the message that the dead shall not rest until the war is over.

| Posted on 2012-05-03 | by a guest


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Flanders Field- It is a WW1 battlefield
Poppies Blow-Poppies blooming or growing
Between the crosses- They are talking about graves
Poppies Grow- Many more soldiers/troops are dying
John A McCrae is the one who wrote this poem
Here are some tips ^^^^
This poem reminded me of the suffering of the past and how the soldiers never gave up in war.

| Posted on 2012-04-26 | by a guest


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Aren\'t poppies the flower of Memorial Day, also?

| Posted on 2012-04-05 | by a guest


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is it also possible that the writer uses poppies because actually they are weed. and as hard as you can try, weed never dissapears. so the poppies represent the dead soldiers, that they are buried in the ground but live forever.? is that possible?

| Posted on 2012-03-05 | by a guest


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I don\'t think that the third stanza is any sort of war propaganda or promotion of war - I interpret the \"foe\" as not the physical enemy but the war itself. I believe McCrae was telling the readers that war should be ended, and that\'s what all the soldiers were fighting for; they weren\'t fighting so that they could kill the enemy. Truly beautiful poem; thank you for all the helpful thoughts and ideas.

| Posted on 2012-03-01 | by a guest


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This helped a lot... really glad this was here to help

| Posted on 2011-12-04 | by a guest


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The first stanza talks about the death, when it says \'the poppies blow\'.
\'Between the crosses\'- Their graves
\'That mark our place\' - The dead talking to us, which is very haunting.
\'The larks, still bravely singing, fly\' - This symbolizes two things-larks are a symbol of courage and persaverance. This line also symbolises that the men are still bravely fighting.
2nd Stanza: Dead men talking to you
\'We are the dead\' ^^
\'Short days ago...saw sunset glow\' Shows they were young dying
\'loved, and were loved\' - they have family
\'and now we lie in Flanders Fields\' they can never escape the war.
3rd Stanza:
\'Take up our quarrel with the foe\' foe = enemies.
\'The torch\' - You must continue the battle.
\'If ye break faith with us who die, we shall not sleep\' - If you are not gratefull for what we have done, all is in vain.
This stanza is talking to those who did not join war and is challenging them to continue.
When it says \'the poppies grow\' it means more men are dying.
This is a very moving poem.

| Posted on 2011-12-04 | by a guest


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Larks are : symbols of people who have the courage and perseverance to carry on with life amid turmoil.
3rd stenza. Torch - duty that dead soldiers pass on to the living.
In this poem: they viewed the war from the perspective of their man, their comrades-in-arms.
Special attention on - the alliteration is much present
Flanders Field Row on Row. bravelY singing flY. Etc.
Good luck !!!

| Posted on 2011-11-06 | by a guest


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i need a smile analysis of this poem,
any one can help me out.

| Posted on 2011-10-31 | by a guest


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i think this poeem is sooo cool i mean its amazin how he dus all of that

| Posted on 2011-10-29 | by a guest


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I have to read this poem for school. I find it quite hard as I have never really looked into English poetry or try to analyse it for that matter. I hope things will become clear next week in class when we discuss it together.

| Posted on 2011-08-30 | by a guest


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Hello and welcome to my shop, i believe that perhaps the larks represent their hope and moral which still manages to stay despite the bloodshed and battles, i hope that i have been a help to you all :) my name is Jamir and im 22 years old, and thats why i think i would be perfect for the playboy mansion ;) xxx

| Posted on 2011-05-31 | by a guest


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I think that the larks could also represent the men who fought in the air and how they were the men on the grounds omly hope. I\'m 14 years old and i\'m studying this for english

| Posted on 2011-05-31 | by a guest


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why has the writer used the image of the lark in the poem?

| Posted on 2011-05-12 | by a guest


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i love how mccrae made such good use of figurative devices.

| Posted on 2011-05-01 | by a guest


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I noticed that someone wrote that the peom should read the poppies \"grow\" between the crosses... but the origial is right, the poem reads \"In Flanders Fields the poppies blow, between the crosses...\" just so everyone knows. I am in a literature class and we are studying this poem at the moment.

| Posted on 2011-03-31 | by a guest


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I\'ve know this poem for a long time (I am 73 yrs old). I was studying poetic forms and it was given to me as a Rondeau form poem. Some say it is some sort of Sonnet; explain please. It really struck me for the way the poet takes a sensitive reader on a fabulous journey of lows, highs, and introspection. As a Viet Nam veteran I was struck by the same emotions of Colonel Mc Crea that I have. I wrote this poem for friends whom I lost in battle. \"Names I Recall\"
~NAMES I RECALL~
Names I Recall; many years ago
I saw them fall, saw young souls go :
the Youth who served their God, to heaven;
or atheists\' sons sacrificially given.
The cross, or magen, or crescent show
on Liberty \'s beaches staked banners glow.
\"I\'ll Give!\" each answered, when asked: \"Who\'ll go?\"
We hallow and remember those monuments, \'graven:
Names I Recall.
We died but as one single Death;
our Mourning sobs one tear, one breath.
Never-ending Hope reigns in our one heart:
far from battles, Reunion , ne\'er to part.
\" For Freedom \" the list will longer grow :
Names I Recall.

| Posted on 2011-03-27 | by a guest


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wonderful poem and i am descrased by the spam posted here

| Posted on 2011-03-17 | by a guest


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wonderful poem and i am descrased by the spam posted here

| Posted on 2011-03-17 | by a guest


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The meter of the poem breathes life (a beating heart)
da dah da dah da dah. The metrical cadence further can be viewed as the marching of the stalwart soldier. The rhyme scheme and format tip off a secret sonnet.I don\'t remember if it is English or Italian. Anyone?
aabba aac aabba. Wait, it is a chorus. Thank you John.

| Posted on 2010-11-26 | by a guest


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I HAve No Family That Does This Shit (That Went To Wars That Dead) Soo hahhaha

| Posted on 2010-11-11 | by a guest


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Larks symbolize happiness, good fortune, and even merriment as they sing hymns at the gates of heaven, due to their beautiful singing. i see McCrae\'s reference to them and how they are scarce heard among the guns below as a symbol of how there might be good things that come from the battle, but that is all blocked from view of the men on the battlefield. Blocked out by fear, and the screams of men and deaths of brothers.

| Posted on 2010-09-22 | by a guest


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The larks could also be bullets whistling through the air. That would be kind of ironic though. As are the poppies because they look pretty and colorful but they actually symbolize the blood shed on the battlefield.

| Posted on 2010-08-31 | by a guest


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A beautiful and moving poem that shows what the war was really like. lovely

| Posted on 2010-08-28 | by a guest


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I am not schooled in poetry and apologize for my ignorance in understanding its intricacies. I have had an interest in this poem for the past 10 years and go over it in my head often. To me, the author is at first, taken by the beauty of the landscape in front of him, forgetting the horror that lies beneath. He is suddenly brought to confront the reality of everything around him and it stirs in him the anger, frustration and overwhelming sorrow he has experienced. And in these raw emotions, he demands that others continue and win the fight. Not necessarily because it is right and just, (though not stated in the poem) but to justify the deaths of so many men.

| Posted on 2010-08-05 | by a guest


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The poppies here signify the remembrance of those that tragically died in Belgium during the war. Are they resting peacefully? Has it been written to encourage others to take the ‘torch’ and defend the honour of the dead soldiers?

| Posted on 2010-07-05 | by a guest


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I would like everyone to know that in the first stanza: (the poppies blow), it is meant to say: "the poppies grow".

| Posted on 2010-06-13 | by a guest


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The poppies blowing refers to them blowing in the breeze when he was writing the poem

| Posted on 2010-06-11 | by a guest


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this poem reminded me of popies but i was upset with other coments as ther are rude Blaqby

| Posted on 2010-06-04 | by a guest


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That mark our place- Poppies grow once plowed, lying for years until the graves being dug plowed poppies. Where there was a poppy, there was a grave.
Last Stanza- Keep Fighting, take the responsibility given by the dead and "hold it high", meaning you need to believe the cause is enough. If they are forgotten, they will have died in vain.

| Posted on 2010-05-19 | by a guest


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The last stanza is ambiguous, I think. On one level, it sounds pro-war, promoting concepts of glory, vengence and duty, similar to the propaganda dogma at the time. Depending on your interpretation, this could be seen as deeply sarcastic, mocking these ideas. This would tune into the fact that McCrae wrote this poem after his young friend and former student died, perhaps expressing his bitterness. On the other hand, I see the last stanza as having a melancholic feel to it, and being more of a plea. McCrae is desperate to believe there is some reason - glory, vengence, duty - that so many innocent lives were being taken. It is also important to consider the fact that John McCrae threw the poem away when he first wrote it (it was retrieved by another officer) suggesting perhaps he didn't realise he'd unintentionally created such an interestingly ambiguous poem. In which case it wholy depends on how the reader looks at it, as there is no way of knowing what he was actually aiming to express.

| Posted on 2010-04-07 | by a guest


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Tankyou very much to the person who posted the
random, helful ideas.... Posted on 2009-06-01! I think you just saved my life!

| Posted on 2010-03-25 | by a guest


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Im currently trying to compare this essay to Charles Hamilton Sorely's epic piece: Untilted. It is which that i would like to bring your attention that if you are to score a succulent volley with the outside of the boot then fanny around with stupid essays like this which mean potentially nothing to the career. It is my advice you stay clear of english literature and score a beautiful egg header.

| Posted on 2009-12-14 | by a guest


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To answer this previous post...Unfortunately, too many people think that "the obvious interpretation of the poem's turning point, 'Take up my quarrel with the foe', is to seek vengence against the enemy" ...but if you look at what McCrae himself says in other works that he had done, you'll find this simply is not the case.
McCrae wrote:
"But from a million British graves took birth
A silent voice -- the million spake as one --
“If ye have righted all the wrongs of earth
Lay by the sword! Its work and ours is done.”
John McCrae, Boar War 1899
The "passing of the torch" is McCrae's way of saying that wherever there are injustices we must "take up the quarrel with the foe" ...until the "work is done" and we can "Lay by the sword"
As for this post "why does the poet use blow instead of grow when referring to the poppies in the first line? like what is he trying to establish???!!!"...if you look at what Cyril Allinson said (Allinson was the person McCrae handed the poem to...and the first person to ever read the poem after McCrae finished writing it) Allinson said "The poem was an exact description of the scene in front of us both. He used
the word blow in that line because the poppies actually were being blown that morning by a gentle east
wind. It never occurred to me at that time that it would ever be published. It seemed to me just an exact
description of the x

| Posted on 2009-11-15 | by a guest


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While the most obvious interpretation of the poem's turning point, 'Take up my quarrel with the foe', is that the reader is then to seek vengence against the enemy for the deaths they've caused, this also appears to undermine the rest of the poem.
The enemy, too, 'loved and were loved'; killing them will simply result in more bodies. This is not a patriotic message - the foe is war.

| Posted on 2009-11-15 | by a guest


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why does the poet use blow instead of grow when referring to the poppies in the first line? like what is he trying to establish???!!!

| Posted on 2009-11-14 | by a guest


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I read the exact same thing as the first post just on a different website...

| Posted on 2009-11-07 | by a guest


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what is the main subject of the poem? I've been asked to do an oral on it on Tuesday,help!

| Posted on 2009-06-07 | by a guest




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