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My November Guest Analysis



Author: poem of Robert Frost Type: poem Views: 117


My Sorrow, when she's here with me,
Thinks these dark days of autumn rain
Are beautiful as days can be;
She loves the bare, the withered tree;
She walks the sodden pasture lane.

Her pleasure will not let me stay.
She talks and I am fain to list:
She's glad the birds are gone away,
She's glad her simple worsted grey
Is silver now with clinging mist.

The desolate, deserted trees,
The faded earth, the heavy sky,
The beauties she so truly sees,
She thinks I have no eye for these,
And vexes me for reason why.

Not yesterday I learned to know
The love of bare November days
Before the coming of the snow,
But it were vain to tell her so,
And they are better for her praise.

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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||




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| Posted on 2013-02-26 | by a guest


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Robert Frost was known for beautiful poetry. This is hardly an exception. I exfoliate my facial skin on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. I burp in public.

| Posted on 2012-10-12 | by a guest


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| Posted on 2012-01-17 | by a guest


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| Posted on 2011-12-09 | by a guest


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it made my balls cry.from the shear beauty of this poem it was beautiful.but itys wimsycal nature and its calming backround becuse of its wonderful description of said month of november.with that i say a derp.

| Posted on 2011-11-15 | by a guest


.: :.

I think that what this poem, My November Guest is saying, is that people do not see the inner beauty of Autumn or the trees that are bare and so we tend to think that that is ugly or in other words dissapointing. But what people don\'t notice is the inner beauty of Autumn, like the colorful leaves on the ground. We tend to judge first then to see and then realize how there is beauty in everything and everyone.

| Posted on 2011-11-03 | by a guest


.: :.

dont look into this so much...
the poem is simply about his sorrow who enjoys the fall, BECAUSE ITS SAD

| Posted on 2011-03-30 | by a guest


.: :.

i think it is about the transformation of beauty and how beauty and sorrow are interlinked. without beauty we cannot have sorrow and without sorrow we cannot have beauty, it is made more beautiful as it is not eternal. the idea that death is imminent is prevalent in the poem. the sombre sense of the poem deals with the ideas that each person carrys with them a personal sorrow.

| Posted on 2011-03-24 | by a guest


.: :.

As I read this poem over and over, and after reading a few of the comments on this page, I began to wonder if this poem was about a relationship ending. If November is the preparation of winter, which is sometimes meant to represent death, then his November guest is beckoning the beginning of an end. His November guest embraces this end and attempts to get him to hear; but as he says he is \"fain to list.\" She and he grow further apart and she is unable to understand why he does not see this and \"vexes him for reasons why\". In the end, after some time has passed, he begins to understand how she came to embrace the end but still was somewhat uncertain. He keeps it to himself because he believes it\'s \"vain to tell her so\". And so, he leaves it at that.

| Posted on 2011-03-06 | by a guest


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A nature poem. Frost in his arena. It\'s nothing short of gorgeous.

| Posted on 2010-11-27 | by a guest


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The simple idea is that he is sorrowfull that he can not tell her he already knows and has seen this beautifull world and she is young and is seeing it for the first time, he sees the vanity of stoping her and they seem even better with her telling, He is older and hearing this only verifies his age.

| Posted on 2010-11-19 | by a guest


.: :.

.: Analysis :.
For many lovers, Robert Frost shows how beautiful love can be, for it makes people change. It shows how many people change for the one they love, not intentionally, but mentally. Many may think of November to be a season of dying, not beauty, but have "she" in the narrator's life during Autumn makes him love it. In line,
"The beauties she so truly sees,
She thinks I have no eye for these,
And vexes me for reason why."
They could NOT be talking about the Autumn but about herself, like many lovers question their partner for their love for them. In the last stanza the poem becomes confusing, if he really loves her, the month of November, or even a woman before her.
An option for symbolism here could be that, yes, he's loved before, but he lets her think that she is the only reason for his liking to the month, yet she still contributes to it.

| Posted on 2010-05-16 | by a guest


.: :.

Frost seems to be saying that it is only through the experience of sadness and loss "My Sorrow when she's here with me" that a certain kind of beauty can be appreciated ; that is a sublime sense of fading desolation and movement towards death, here represented by late autumn.
His "November Guest" is both the cause and the relief of this pain. "The beauties she so truly sees, She thinks I have no eye for these, and vexes me for reasons why." Frost may be reluctant to reveal the reason, as it is his "November Guest" who has caused him the grief in the first place, perhaps by leaving his love for her unrequited or unappreciated. "But it were vain to tell her so, And they are better for her praise."
He realises that telling her of the pain he is in will do no good. Yet as the personification of his sorrow, and of the season itself, it is through her eyes, illuminating the stark beauty around him, that he finds his comfort. Without this experience of sorrow, he would be diminished.

| Posted on 2009-11-05 | by a guest


.: :.

This piece by Robert Frost is a personification of the saying misery loves company. In the beginning of the poem Frost describes misery as the love of the dark autumn rain, withered trees, and sodden pasture lanes. He describes the leaving of summer and the coming winter as a joyous event. Describing the event is a reference as to how some times one likes to be miserable about things that were to be considered miserable. “She is glad the birds are gone away, she’s glad her simple worsted grey is silver now with clinging mist.”
In his piece Frost admits he has much appreciation for what people consider to be miserable events, but also that he believes that misery is in the eye of the beholder, that one could view life as a series of misfortunes rather than the beautiful gift of change that people are so lucky to experience. “The beauties she so truly sees, she thinks I have no eye for these, and vexes me for reason why.”
Frost however would rather miserable people enjoy their own company than be drawn into their outlook on life. As he describes, “Not yesterday I learned to know the love of bare November days before the coming of the snow, but it were vain to tell her so, and they are better for her praise.”

| Posted on 2009-08-24 | by a guest


.: :.

For many lovers, Robert Frost shows how beautiful love can be, for it makes people change. It shows how many people change for the one they love, not intentionally, but mentally. Many may think of November to be a season of dying, not beauty, but have \"she\" in the narrator\'s life during Autumn makes him love it. In line, They could NOT be talking about the Autumn but about herself, like many lovers question their partner for their love for them.

| Posted on 2009-05-20 | by a guest


.: My November Guest :.

In "My November Guest", Robert Frost captures the essence of Derrida’s classical concept of the ‘Other’ as represented in the textual trace of a poet’s transcendent range of perceptions and projections. That is, a conveyance of ideas via the phenomenological transmission of the universally receptive experience of poetry. Frost starts with what must be considered a given premise; that is, those who are reading his verses must have already learned to appreciate, albeit in a very personal way, the terrible beauty of their relative sufferings. They understand beauty as being the coordination or display of situation-appropriate metaphysical raiment, very much dependent upon the various inner dynamics of ones being.
As always, Frosts’ classical use of nature’s milieu tends to resonate so much more for its readily accessible associations. And again in November Guest, his poetic voice contemplates suffering and sorrow as it is absorbed through the chillingly somber natural drama of autumn succumbing to winter. Therein flourishes the paradox of what is held to be beautiful; for deep within the suffering human heart resides a well known, though vexing facility to recognize and, indeed, cherish this torment in its haunting beauty. Just as when the entire world is bathed in the brilliant warm and euphoric ambiance of one’s first raptures in love, conversely, when we lose that love, it is as though we then experience an antithetical realm or parallel, yet, opposite transience through the underside of the same strong emotions. Thus sorrow often unspeakably seeks its still greater depths as one intentionally tarries, emerged within the strange comfort of ones own privately appreciated misery. So we find consoling identification within the “Simple worsted gray” scenes of “these dark days of autumn rain; the bare, desolate, deserted trees; faded earth and heavy sky”.
Who of us has not felt the heavy murk of sorrowful desolation that excludes all else around us? And having thus been enveloped in our own cocoon of connective loss, refused to let go of the rapidly fading memory of what we have lost; because we could see, if only for a little longer, that this is where that beauty lingers. This isolated inner venue enables us to hold on to what will not be again; to love its last fresh memory, albeit in the withered bones of the barest of November days, before the “coming snow” covers it, and its form becomes less and less distinct under the ever numbing smooth white coldness of monotonous layers of winter’s time.

| Posted on 2008-03-14 | by a guest


.: November :.

From the first line we know "she" is not a person at all but the personification of sorrow:
-My Sorrow, when she's here with me,-

From the rest of the first Stanza, we are given examples of how desolate things appear comforting when we are sad. (Misery loves company)
-Thinks these dark days of autumn rain
Are beautiful as days can be
She loves the bare, the withered tree;
She walks the sodden pasture lane.-
Translation: Sadness loves the empty, barren and withered.


The second stanza describes the conflict between feeling both sad and uncomfortable with being sad:
-Her pleasure will not let me stay.
She talks and I am fain to list:-
Translation: Sadness' "pleasure" or things that are sad are too hard to take or listen to.


-She's glad the birds are gone away,
She's glad her simple worsted grey
Is silver now with clinging mist.-
Sorrow makes us seek solitude, greys and colorless things that don't distract us from what bothers us.

-The beauties she so truly sees,
She thinks I have no eye for these,
And vexes me for reason why.-
What appears beautiful when you are sad? Typically it's the absence of something you lost, or can't figure out. Your frustration may convince you that you are not understanding the causes, the means to prevent yourself from experiencing sorrow.

-Not yesterday I learned to know
The love of bare November days-
This wasn't the author's first encounter with pain.

-Before the coming of the snow,
But it were vain to tell her so,-
Trying to tell himself that he knew he'd be alright at that point was too difficult

-And they are better for her praise. -
Sometimes fighting something instead of just living through it makes it more difficult.


| Posted on 2007-11-07 | by a guest


.: Analysis :.

For many lovers, Robert Frost shows how beautiful love can be, for it makes people change. It shows how many people change for the one they love, not intentionally, but mentally. Many may think of November to be a season of dying, not beauty, but have "she" in the narrator's life during Autumn makes him love it. In line,
"The beauties she so truly sees,
She thinks I have no eye for these,
And vexes me for reason why."
They could NOT be talking about the Autumn but about herself, like many lovers question their partner for their love for them. In the last stanza the poem becomes confusing, if he really loves her, the month of November, or even a woman before her.
An option for symbolism here could be that, yes, he's loved before, but he lets her think that she is the only reason for his liking to the month, yet she still contributes to it.

| Posted on 2007-10-26 | by a guest


.: Analysis :.

For many lovers, Robert Frost shows how beautiful love can be, for it makes people change. It shows how many people change for the one they love, not intentionally, but mentally. Many may think of November to be a season of dying, not beauty, but have "she" in the narrator's life during Autumn makes him love it. In line,
"The beauties she so truly sees,
She thinks I have no eye for these,
And vexes me for reason why."
They could NOT be talking about the Autumn but about herself, like many lovers question their partner for their love for them. In the last stanza the poem becomes confusing, if he really loves her, the month of November, or even a woman before her.
An option for symbolism here could be that, yes, he's loved before, but he lets her think that she is the only reason for his liking to the month, yet she still contributes to it.

| Posted on 2007-10-26 | by a guest




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