famous poetry
| Famous Poetry | Roleplay | Free Video Tutorials | Online Poetry Club | Free Education | Best of Youtube | Ear Training

Reconciliation Analysis



Author: Poetry of Walt Whitman Type: Poetry Views: 1436




WORD over all, beautiful as the sky!
Beautiful that war, and all its deeds of carnage, must in time be
utterly lost;
That the hands of the sisters Death and Night, incessantly softly
wash again, and ever again, this soil'd world:
... For my enemy is dead--a man divine as myself is dead;
I look where he lies, white-faced and still, in the coffin--I draw
near;
I bend down, and touch lightly with my lips the white face in the
coffin.

Sponsor


122 Free Video Tutorials

[Video Tutorial] How to build google chrome extensions

Please add me on youtube. I make free educational video tutorials on youtube such as Basic HTML and CSS.

Free Online Education from Top Universities

Yes! It's true. Online College Education is now free!



||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||




.: :.

The theme of the poem reconciliation is the title itself. Its setting cannot really be determined that it is in the midst of war. The first four lines of the poem suggest that there is a plan for reconciling the speakers opponent which is referred to the \"man\" himself. The speaker had foreseen the bright and good consequence of his plan to have a reconciliation. He compares it to the sky. The sisters Night and Death refers to anger and hatred respectively. Of course when one is at the height of anger, one seems to see nothing. Common consequences of it is accidental or unintentional crimes or killings. Hence, the speaker had foreseen that Anger (Night) and Hatred (Death) will no longer exist after the plan of reconciling will be done.
However, in the last for lines, it seems that the plan will no longer happen because the speaker\'s enemy was already dead. The speaker now considers his enemy as divine as himself but his unfortunate and late enough to have have himself be reconciled with the dead man.
Myko Vincent W. Cagalitan
UCLM-Education

| Posted on 2011-12-14 | by a guest


.: :.

The theme of the poem reconciliation is the title itself. Its setting cannot really be determined that it is in the midst of war. The first four lines of the poem suggest that there is a plan for reconciling the speakers opponent which is referred to the \"man\" himself. The speaker had foreseen the bright and good consequence of his plan to have a reconciliation. He compares it to the sky. The sisters Night and Death refers to anger and hatred respectively. Of course when one is at the height of anger, one seems to see nothing. Common consequences of it is accidental or unintentional crimes or killings. Hence, the speaker had foreseen that Anger (Night) and Hatred (Death) will no longer exist after the plan of reconciling will be done.
However, in the last for lines, it seems that the plan will no longer happen because the speaker\'s enemy was already dead. The speaker now considers his enemy as divine as himself but his unfortunate and late enough to have have himself be reconciled with the dead man.
Myko Vincent W. Cagalitan
UCLM-Education

| Posted on 2011-12-14 | by a guest


.: :.

The "Word" Whitman refers to in the first line is, of course, "reconciliation" -- the poem's title. He draws on natural imagery ("beautiful as the sky"), he plays at contradictions ("beautiful that war") to get at the healing power of reconciliation. But what does he mean my reconciliation? At first, he seems to be talking about natural forces - death, night, time - that cleanse ("wash again, and ever agin this soil'd world"). These natural elements seem to negate man's unnatural acts ("war," "deeds of carnage").

In the last three lines, he redefines "reconciliation" in personal, human terms. Whitman locates the poem in a specific time and place: a funeral. And he identifies the speaker as an agent in the drama - perhaps a soldier, perhaps the dead man's killer - <em>not</em> the omniscient narrator he seemed to be in the first lines.

And suddenly the poem is littered with first-person words ("my, myself, I,"). The speaker identifies with the dead man ("divine as myself"). And we see a different sort of reconciliation - the gentle kiss of apology/foregiveness that a soldier places on the cheek of his vanquished foe.




| Posted on 2006-05-02 | by Approved Guest




Post your Analysis




Message

Free Online Education from Top Universities

Yes! It's true. College Education is now free!







Most common keywords

Reconciliation Analysis Walt Whitman critical analysis of poem, review school overview. Analysis of the poem. literary terms. Definition terms. Why did he use? short summary describing. Reconciliation Analysis Walt Whitman Characters archetypes. Sparknotes bookrags the meaning summary overview critique of explanation online education meaning metaphors symbolism characterization itunes. Quick fast explanatory summary. pinkmonkey free cliffnotes cliffnotes ebook pdf doc file essay summary literary terms analysis professional definition summary synopsis sinopsis interpretation critique Reconciliation Analysis Walt Whitman itunes audio book mp4 mp3



Poetry 6
Poetry 6
Poetry 85
Poetry 103
Poetry 100
Poetry 131
Poetry 192
Poetry 179
Poetry 108
Poetry 81
Poetry 29
Poetry 22
Poetry 77
Poetry 43
Poetry 32
Poetry 205
Poetry 166
Poetry 92
Poetry 82
Poetry 85