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The Voice Analysis



Author: poem of Thomas Hardy Type: poem Views: 40


Woman much missed, how you call to me, call to me,
Saying that now you are not as you were
When you had changed from the one who was all to me,
But as at first, when our day was fair.

Can it be you that I hear?  Let me view you, then,
Standing as when I drew near to the town
Where you would wait for me: yes, as I knew you then,
Even to the original air-blue gown!

Or is it only the breeze in its listlessness
Travelling across the wet mead to me here,
You being ever dissolved to wan wistlessness,
Heard no more again far or near?

   Thus I; faltering forward,
   Leaves around me falling,
Wind oozing thin through the thorn from norward,
   And the woman calling.

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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||




.: :.

Hardy is saddened at the death of his wife Emma. She was deranged before her death and grew worse with each passing year.The aim of the voice is to relive moments that cannot be regained- happy moments.
Hardy is trying to remember Emma the way she was before their marriage took such a complex twist.Maybe its his guilt talking or maybe it isn\'t.

| Posted on 2013-05-24 | by a guest


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Every one admits that men\'s life seems to be not cheap, however people need cash for different things and not every person earns enough cash. Thus to receive quick personal loans and just auto loan should be a correct way out.

| Posted on 2012-09-23 | by a guest


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your all wrong, for emma was actually SPIDER MAN!!! i know, i was surprised too at first, then i realized hardy\'s name spelt backwards is YDRAH!! i know!!! very shocking coincidence.

| Posted on 2012-02-20 | by a guest


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The first thing is that most of the disappointment in their marriage came from Emma suffering from genetic chronic depression. this poem, written between 1912 and 1913 is just hardy reminiscing and hoping for the return of Emma who died nov 27 1912.many of his poems have this distinct tone and diction style in relation to Emma esp A broken appointment, Neutral Tones and the phantom horsewoman. her voice is compared to the wind and seems as fleeting and hard to keep with him despite his attempts the memories and the separation eventually leads to his overbearing listlessness and lack of enthusiasm towards life. Thus \"faltering forward\"
-cookie ask for more if needed

| Posted on 2012-02-13 | by a guest


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UR commenrs r gr8 guyzzz! i iz studying engalish literatare nd i tink tis qewl :p

| Posted on 2012-01-11 | by a guest


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Hello People. Before you comment, please learn your grammar. HA!

| Posted on 2011-07-08 | by a guest


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Right. Basically Hardy fell in luv with Emma and was head over heels for her..Emma and Hardy wanted to be a writer one day.. but the poor soul wasnt very good at it.!! after thier marriage, ( when people started noticing Hardy\'s work) Hardy was soo occupied with his work and poetry and novels that he didnt bother or \"have time\" to help Emma with her writing. He knew she wasnt much of a good writer but didnt want to hurt her...so he just sort of ignored her...then HE BECAME FAMOUS!!! he met lots of people, including this lady called Florence who wanted to be a writer as well..Hardy supported her writing and helped her as much as he could (INFRONT OF EMMA!!!)..Emma was a bit jelous, and apparently she felt isolated and betrayed and sad and lonely....When special high class people came to dine with the Hardy family, Emma always embarressed Hardy , acting a bit mental and unsually awkward...events like this split up thier relationship...nd Hardy pretty much spent his time going to dinner parties without emma nd writing peorty in his room (avoiding EMMA)...and Emma all sick of this, moved to the attic, taking all her possesions and clothes nd books and everything...The hardy\'s spent thier time ignoring each other like tht for a while..meanwhile Emma was getting very very very very ill but refused to inform Hardy that she was ill ( maybe could not admit being vulnerable) and one night she couldnt even talk or get out of her bed in the cold attic..the maid ran and called Hardy ( who was in his study, writng sum poem) and HARDY just assumed it was Emma\'s plain old exaggerrations or mental breakdowns...So anywaii that night Hardy after a looong time,went up to the attic to see his wife dead!! and just at tht moment, just when he saw her face, a sudden remorse and guilt rushed into him...and he fell in loev with her all over again...so HARDY basically just wants to see EMMA and begs her for mercy...:)...Just read the Claire Tomalin book- Thomas Hardy- The Time-Torn Man!!!! such a dull guy with an intresting life !!!

| Posted on 2011-05-22 | by a guest


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I thought this was about Hardy begging it of his wife because he is bored with Florence. Very, very bored.

| Posted on 2011-04-17 | by a guest


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I thought this was about Hardy begging it of his wife because he is bored with Florence. Very, very bored.

| Posted on 2011-04-17 | by a guest


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I think he feels guilty because he wrote this poem shortly after his wife had died. It was a known fact that their marrige was not a hppy one, and when she died Hardy was shocked. He wrote that he felt guilty because when she first got sick, he didn\'t really care that much. So that\'s the guilt part.
the poem is pretty sad when you read it\'s background, although not a criey type.

| Posted on 2011-03-10 | by a guest


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I believe that Thomas hardys main point in the poem \"the voice\" is nostalgic as @ line 4 he says when \'our day was fair\' thus bringing forth memories.he goes on to something about the \'air blue gown\' ,here it shows that he remembers even the pettiest thing ab out her. However I DO NOT UNDERSTAND WHERE HIM FEELING GUILTY IS COMING FROM!!! could some1 please xplain =>

| Posted on 2011-02-22 | by a guest


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SHAWN
ohtr points aprt...rowling aint just makin money....she had a story to tell....dr is a cmplt generation which has grwon wid harry and connected wid him....
wt di u thnk???
garry

| Posted on 2011-02-14 | by a guest


.: :.

SHAWN
ohtr points aprt...rowling aint just makin money....she had a story to tell....dr is a cmplt generation which has grwon wid harry and connected wid him....
wt di u thnk???
garry

| Posted on 2011-02-14 | by a guest


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This is one poem which has depth, judgement, and some amount of meaning in it. The desperation of this one man alone to be with his wife again is quite touching along with the fact that he still has a little bit of hope at the beginning. All in all this one peice of poetry worthy of praise and apreciation.

| Posted on 2011-01-26 | by a guest


.: :.

Imagining he can indeed hear her, Hardy implores Emma to appear to him, in the place and wearing the same clothes that he associates with their early courtship. Hardy introduces, in the third stanza, the mocking fear that all he hears is the wind and that Emma\'s death has marked the end of her existence - that she has been dissolved and will be heard no more.
The lively anapaestic metre of the first three stanzas gives way, in the final stanza, to a less fluent rhythm, capturing the desolate mood of Hardy as he falters forward, while the leaves fall and the north wind blows, as Emma (if it is she) continues to call.
The poem begins optimistically with a hope that Emma is really addressing Hardy. But by the end, a belief or fear that the voice is imaginary has replaced this hope. Though the vigorous anapaestic metre of the poem helps convey this initial hope, it proves unwieldy for Hardy, as is evident in the clumsy third stanza, where listlessness rhymes with Hardy\'s unfortunate coinage (invented word) existlessness, and we find the gauche and repetitious phrase no more again in the stanza\'s final line.
Turning back to the days when Emma\'s youth and beauty captivated him, Hardy wonders why, in later years, the joys of their courtship were neither remembered nor revived. He imagines how they might have rekindled their love by revisiting the places where they met while courting.
Finally Hardy concedes that what has happened cannot be changed and that he is as good as dead, waiting for the end ( to sink down soon ) and, in conclusion, informs Emma that she could not know how so sudden and unexpected a passing as hers could distress him as much as it has.
The metre of the poem is surprisingly lively, though the rhythm breaks down in the disjointed syntax and brief sentences of the final stanza. The brief rhyming couplet in the penultimate two lines of each stanza exaggerate this jauntiness, which seems rather inappropriate to the subject of the piece.
Though the reader sympathises with Hardy\'s evident grief, it is difficult not to be a little impatient with his tendency to wallow in self-pity. He reproaches Emma for leaving him, and thinks despairingly of his and her failure to rekindle, in later years, their youthful affection. Yet we feel that this is a tragedy largely of his own making. He has, after all, had some forty years in which to seek/That time\'s renewal. The fact that he expresses regret at his failure to do so only when the possibility has been removed by Emma\'s death casts doubt upon the sincerity of his grief.

| Posted on 2011-01-15 | by a guest


.: :.

Anonymus - Detailed overview
The Voice is one of the extra ordinary group of poems written between 1912 and 1913.
Thomas Hardy wrote this poem after the death of his wife Emma, to alliveate the pain, guilt and depression and to reveal his feeling of loss and emptiness.
The poem has an optimistic opening in which Hardy hears Emma\'s voice, and there is hope. The rhythm in the first stanza is also steady and ongoing which adds to the hope.
In the second stanza, Hughes is desperate to be with his wife again. He is eager to be with her as he used to in their firts few years of love. His desperation is obivous, as he clearly remembers the exact shade of her gown. The beat here is also continuous, showing that he is full content when he is with her or when he thinks she is around.
In the third stanza, Hughes realises that she is gone and with her death, her existance ended. He uses the words \'dissolve\' and \'no more\' which show that she is leaving him and his hope now turns into fear. The siblance slows things down in this stanza as he realises that she isn\'t there anymore. Also, the siblance brings a haunting effect to the poem as now Emma will always be in his memory and the fact that Hughes did not take care of her before her death when she was ill will remain with him forever.
His use of the question mark (?) show that he is confused and he doubts his sanity due to the guilt of neglecting her.
In the last stanza, he says that he is struggling to move forward and he feels like the world has come to an end but the leaves are falling off trees, proving him worng. He knows now that he will have to move on, but is not yet ready. The use of alliteration with the \'th\' sound slow down the rhythm and show his struggle.
The last line, \"And the woman calling\" brings us back to the beggining and to the same conclusion, that he can hear her. This shows the cycle of life, that we will always end up where we begin. Sometimes we are happy and at otehr tiems we will go thorugh hardships, but they won\'t last forever, we will eventually move on. He hears her voice again, after the doubt showing that he knows he has to move on, but is not ready just yet.

| Posted on 2010-12-29 | by a guest


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wtv i find the vioce so boring i dont care shit for i

| Posted on 2010-11-24 | by a guest


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Lets just say... there are some questionable interpretations here.
For starters, many people seem to have the idea that the poet/narrator/Thomas Hardy is grieving because his lover (the voice/woman much missed/Emma Lavinia Gifford) has changed in the sense that shes gotten old (and someone said something about fat???) and less attractive than when he first met her. Although this would appear to be a logical interpretation, it is most likely incorrect. \"The Voice\" is essentially an elegy in memory of Thomas Hardy\'s first wife, Emma. If any of you spared even one minute browsing the wikipedia page on Hardy you would know that although the two were very much in love at first, their marriage was eventually unsuccessful and they became estranged from each other until Emma\'s death. This is most likely (in my opinion) because Hardy was from a social class thats inferior to Emma\'s and therefore cannot provide her standards of living that are similar to what she had before she was married (a novelist at that time barely survives... only in our crazy era can you find people making money off novels like J.K, Rowling.) This, amongst other factors (many things can lead to failures in marriage, even staying married is a obstacle to marriage), eventually turned the two against each other. THUS, it is evident that whatever the cause, what Hardy is referring to in this poem is not anything close to telling his wive to get liposuction and plastic surgery in Korea, but to return from the spiteful, unsatisfied woman after marriage into the loving, tender woman he knew and loved before they married.
Phew, I hope that cleared a bit of the poem up...
Please, please understand that although literary works are supposedly \"subjective\" and \"open to interpretations\", it does not mean that you can say everything. Interpretations are only interpretations when they are justified with reason and evidence.
Thanks.
Shawn, IB student

| Posted on 2010-10-31 | by a guest


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a mi me gusta javier abdelnour suarez. I love javier abdelnour suarez

| Posted on 2010-10-15 | by a guest


.: :.

Amazing posts,
But I was wondering about, the mood of the poem, with examples, and does the mood change?

| Posted on 2010-09-24 | by a guest


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the first stanza is particulary haunting, especially when he echoes \"call to me, call to me\".

| Posted on 2010-09-20 | by a guest


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According to me, the last stanza is quiet filmy when all the leaves are falling, it makes me imagine that Hardy is standing in a jungle and is surrounded by a lot of brown trees that have amazing golden-yellow leaves which are falling on the ground and all of the ground is yellow. This makes me think that Hardy\'s life is coming to an end and Emma is calling him and there is a slow repetition like how it happens in movies!!!
All the comments were of no use to me apart from the person who wrote about the sentence which is formed by taking the lines from the starting of the stanza. Just love that guy.

| Posted on 2010-08-20 | by a guest


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Hello people of earth im an alien relly im the real deal ive read this analysis and i think its trash pure dog produce!

| Posted on 2010-07-08 | by a guest


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If you observe the first line of every stanza u will see that they
make a sentence : ("Woman much missed)( how you call to me)( or is it only the breeze? )(Thus I faltering forward")

| Posted on 2010-06-16 | by a guest


.: :.

Ahh.... the wonders of interpretation: no clear right or wrong and subsequently squablling ensues.
Although be thankful as it promotes the exchange of ideas (although that's not always a good thing - echoes of Mein Kampf spring to mind)
... just a sort of observation, there it is.

| Posted on 2010-06-08 | by a guest


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Hi guys i really need the literary terms which is included in this poem so can anyone please post it?
Thank You
-UnbornGirl

| Posted on 2010-05-11 | by a guest


.: :.

Okay so I'm just 16 and this is my first post so go easy on me. =)
The poem The Voice by Thomas Hardy is the summation of the pain and suffering he feels after he loses his wife. The calling he feels coming from his wife refers to his longing for her and the way he is unable to adjust to the major changes that have come in his wife.
okay I can't do this,

| Posted on 2010-05-03 | by a guest


.: :.

As in The Haunter Hardy imagines Emma trying to communicate with him. The poem is in the first person, and Hardy is the speaker, imagining that Emma calls to him. She tells him that she is not the woman she had become after forty years of marriage, but has regained the beauty of her youth, of the time when her and Hardy's “day was fair”.
Imagining he can indeed hear her, Hardy implores Emma to appear to him, in the place and wearing the same clothes that he associates with their early courtship. Hardy introduces, in the third stanza, the mocking fear that all he hears is the wind and that Emma's death has marked the end of her existence - that she has been “dissolved” and will be “heard no more”.
The lively anapaestic metre of the first three stanzas gives way, in the final stanza, to a less fluent rhythm, capturing the desolate mood of Hardy as he falters forward, while the leaves fall and the north wind blows, as Emma (if it is she) continues to call.
The poem begins optimistically with a hope that Emma is really addressing Hardy. But by the end, a belief or fear that the “voice” is imaginary has replaced this hope. Though the vigorous anapaestic metre of the poem helps convey this initial hope, it proves unwieldy for Hardy, as is evident in the clumsy third stanza, where “listlessness” rhymes with Hardy's unfortunate coinage (invented word) “existlessness”, and we find the gauche and repetitious phrase “no more again” in the stanza's final line.

| Posted on 2010-03-28 | by a guest


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I disagree with the comment made about an optimistic opening- I would actually say that the use of repetion and cadence echoes loss, sadness and desperation.

| Posted on 2010-03-12 | by a guest


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thak you ppl...this was kinda useful...keep it up smart ppl ;)

| Posted on 2010-02-01 | by a guest


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thanks alot for all the people who wrote these summaries i really appreciate it
thanks again :)

| Posted on 2009-12-26 | by a guest


.: :.

The poem has an optimistic opening in which Hardy hears Emma's voice, and there is hope. The rhythm in the first stanza is also steady and ongoing which adds to the hope.
In the second stanza, Hughes is desperate to be with his wife again. He is eager to be with her as he used to in their firts few years of love. His desperation is obivous, as he clearly remembers the exact shade of her gown. The beat here is also continuous, showing that he is full content when he is with her or when he thinks she is around.
In the third stanza, Hughes realises that she is gone and with her death, her existance ended. He uses the words 'dissolve' and 'no more' which show that she is leaving him and his hope now turns into fear. The siblance slows things down in this stanza as he realises that she isn't there anymore. Also, the siblance brings a haunting effect to the poem as now Emma will always be in his memory and the fact that Hughes did not take care of her before her death when she was ill will remain with him forever.
His use of the question mark (?) show that he is confused and he doubts his sanity due to the guilt of neglecting her.
In the last stanza, he says that he is struggling to move forward and he feels like the world has come to an end but the leaves are falling off trees, proving him worng. He knows now that he will have to move on, but is not yet ready. The use of alliteration with the 'th' sound slow down the rhythm and show his struggle.
The last line, "And the woman calling" brings us back to the beggining and to the same conclusion, that he can hear her. This shows the cycle of life, that we will always end up where we begin. Sometimes we are happy and at otehr tiems we will go thorugh hardships, but they won't last forever, we will eventually move on. He hears her voice again, after the doubt showing that he knows he has to move on, but is not ready just yet.

| Posted on 2009-10-13 | by a guest


.: :.

Commentary on ‘The Voice’ by Thomas Hardy
‘The Voice’ by Thomas Hardy seems to be about the speaker’s feeling of pain and the overwhelming nostalgia that he feels regarding the loss of his lover. He imagines that she is returning to him as he repeats the phrase ‘how you call to me’, and states that she is ‘much missed’, indicating his needs to see her. In the middle of the poem, there is hope and nostalgia ‘Can it be you that I hear?’ but the speaker soon loses his hopefulness. Near the end of the poem, the speaker feels defeated as the quote ‘Leaves around me falling’ hints and we sense the spirit of the woman fading out. As we read the poem, we realise that it was someone very close to him in the past, perhaps his wife, Emma Lavinia Gifford, once beautiful and young but now older and larger. He might have wrote this poem out of guilt after his wife died because he wasn’t supporting her at the time. The metaphorical message of this poem might be that humans tend to find isolation hard to deal with.
In the first stanza, the poet is mourning about the physical change of his lover and towards the end of it, he looks back in time when the ‘day was fair’. In the passage ‘woman much missed’ the poet uses the word ‘woman’ to describe his dear lover. It is a distant, materialistic word which makes us feel that poet doesn’t truly love her. When the poet states ‘now you are not as you were’ and ‘when you had changed from the one who was all to me’ it shows that the poet longs for the past and he implies that this elderly woman was not the one he fell in love with at first. This could also mean that she must not reveal herself if she is not as she looked in the past. When the speaker says ‘when our day was fair’ he could be referring to when his lover was beautiful or when it was fair for him that he had an attractive woman.
When the poet asks ‘ Can it be you that I hear?’ it shows us his longing for her but when he states ‘let me view you’ we realise he only wants to see her initial beauty. He the progresses to daydream as he says ‘Standing as when I drew near to the town where you would wait for me’ and ‘as I knew you then’ yearning for his submissive youthful lover. The phrase ‘Even to the original air blue gown!’ refers to the girl when she used to be originally beautiful and fresh as the word ‘air-blue’ implies. All the points above demonstrate that he loves this woman in a shallow way, desiring only the good looks of her young self.
When the poet says ‘Or is it only the breeze in its listlessness’ he begins to doubt about her presence but he secretly hopes that it is her, wondering freely like the wind, ignoring him. The ‘wet mead’ might represent his feelings, wet because of his tears. The poet uses words like ‘dissolve’ and ‘heard no more again’ to describe the breeze, which he thinks is his lover’s spirit and this shows us that the lover might be dead.
The words ‘faltering forwards’ means that he is struggling to move onwards, he feels that the world is coming to an end as the sentence ‘leaves around me falling’ convey a sense of death and sadness. The passage ‘wind oozing thin through the thorn from norward’ might refer to the spirit of the lover coming from the skies, maybe paradise, and gush through him, the thorn. He calls himself a thorn because it symbolises pain and exclusion. The breeze or wind symbolises his lover which can easily come and go away. The last sentence ‘and the woman calling’ evokes a sense of loneliness as if it were the last time he will ever hear her again.
Structure & Mood
The Poem starts off with a steady rhythm and fairly optimistic but as the poem progresses it become nostalgic and full of despair:
• In the first stanza, the poet is mourning about the physical change of his lover and towards the end of it, he looks back in time when the ‘day was fair’. The rhythm is steady and ongoing which adds hope to the reader.
• The second stanza is full of hope and nostalgia as he thinks back to the old days. He believes Emma is trying to talk to communicate with him. The rhythm is also steady because he is thinking about nice memories and it is nearly story like. The sentence ‘even to the original air blue gown’ stands out because the rhythm does not fit in with the rest of the poem
• In this third stanza, he begins to feel less confident and hopeful and he uses a lot of natural imagery to convey this. The rhythm slows down a bit as he realises she is gone. The words ‘listlessness’ and ‘wistlessness’ call each other and create a sense of sibilance, as if the presence is haunting him.
• In the last stanza, the poet has given up and he is depressed because he feels he will never see his woman again. This stanza has a cut rhythm like staggering and it is fading away with the spirit. The alliteration in this stanza also slows down the tempo. It seems like the poet has realized that the voice is imaginary and has to move forwards but he is finding it difficult. This stanza is much shorter than the others and it is combined with short sharp sentences and long phrases to create chaos and emphasise the speaker’s misery.

| Posted on 2009-10-02 | by a guest


.: :.

THE VOICE
The poem “The Voice” describes the encounter of a person with the “spirit” of a woman. As we read the poem it is quite clear that the woman and the persona where very close in the past. He is not scared of her presence but instead he is in a way criticizing her about her past when they where together. As you read the poem you can¢t be sure if the persona is actually talking to someone or to himself. He feels that he wants to redeem himself from something that he has done in the past and now regrets and here that woman is the “angel of his salvation”. In the poem the persona expresses his grieve in depth and he demonstrates this with his use of language which in this case is alliteration, metaphor and occasionally repetition. In addition, we see that the persona is somehow unable to prevail over his grief and to go on with his life. In the end we feel the presence of the woman fading out, possibly suggesting that she will never return and the persona will just be left with her memories. The whole poem connects to the writer¢s personal life. Thomas Hardy¢s wife was one of the fairest of the area and came from a wealthy family but as the years went by, his wife¢s beauty was replaced by age signs and extra weight something which bothered Hardy a lot. They never got a divorce but their marriage bondage stopped functioning. When she died, surprisingly, Hardy was shocked. After her loss, most of the time Hardy was sorrowful, depressed and he wouldn¢t stop grieving. The poem is most likely dedicated to her and the reason for that is most of the time in the poem he is telling the woman how nice she was when she was attractive and that he doesn¢t want her to reveal herself if she is not as she was in the past “Let me view you, then, standing as when I drew near to the town where you would wait for me”.
The themes and ideas of the poem are many and various but they all lead to some central and main themes and ideas. I suppose that the poem really focuses on the persona¢s misery, guilt, grief and denial. We can spot all this “theme emotions” through his grief and pain which is stated by repetition here “…you call to me, call to me” which implies his need to look at the woman who is hypothetically calling him. Furthermore Through alliteration, “Woman much missed” which emphasizes the depth of his grief. He is also very doubtful throughout the poem which shows the persona¢s insecure personality. He is not particularly frightened by the supernatural “element” around him, he is just cautious and rather anxious, “Can it be you that I hear”, and we can see in the persona¢s voice that he states this with hesitation as if he hopes that she is there but doesn¢t dare believe it. Throughout the poem the persona¢s attitude towards the woman is moderately apathetic with a fairly strong sense of bitterness which possibly originates from his resentment and sorrow. However, as we continue to read the persona slowly is shifting his state of mind. Still he is listless towards her but now other feelings such as remorse and guilt alter his behavior towards himself, as if he is trying to adjust his personality according to his life right now. In the last stanza I assume that the fact that the persona acknowledges his emotional collapse “faltering forward, leaves around me falling” forms a feeling of hope and an opportunity to rise up from his ashes and rebirth into a new life were the woman¢s voice would be elapsed and gone forever.

| Posted on 2009-09-21 | by a guest


.: :.

i dont know who wrote the pseudo-analysis but paraphrasing is not analysisng, it is useful when trying to get the meaning of the poem, however this overview just goes around the bushes and lacks seriousness even at the time of saying who was the poet who wrote it.

| Posted on 2009-05-27 | by a guest


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i really appreciated the summary it really helped me thank you and ignore the criticsms, it was extremely helpful

| Posted on 2009-05-19 | by a guest


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this analysis is not worth anything, I'm sorry to whoever wrote this. First of all it's Hardy, not Hughes, and second of all don't state the obvious, people aren't that stupid

| Posted on 2009-05-08 | by a guest


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Many thanks to the person who wrote the summary !
Please keep writing them for different poems and stories :)
I got at A+ !
Thankyou :)

| Posted on 2009-02-25 | by a guest


.: :.

Anonymus - Detailed overview
The Voice is one of the extra ordinary group of poems written between 1912 and 1913.
Thomas Hardy wrote this poem after the death of his wife Emma, to alliveate the pain, guilt and depression and to reveal his feeling of loss and emptiness.
The poem has an optimistic opening in which Hardy hears Emma's voice, and there is hope. The rhythm in the first stanza is also steady and ongoing which adds to the hope.
In the second stanza, Hughes is desperate to be with his wife again. He is eager to be with her as he used to in their firts few years of love. His desperation is obivous, as he clearly remembers the exact shade of her gown. The beat here is also continuous, showing that he is full content when he is with her or when he thinks she is around.
In the third stanza, Hughes realises that she is gone and with her death, her existance ended. He uses the words 'dissolve' and 'no more' which show that she is leaving him and his hope now turns into fear. The siblance slows things down in this stanza as he realises that she isn't there anymore. Also, the siblance brings a haunting effect to the poem as now Emma will always be in his memory and the fact that Hughes did not take care of her before her death when she was ill will remain with him forever.
His use of the question mark (?) show that he is confused and he doubts his sanity due to the guilt of neglecting her.
In the last stanza, he says that he is struggling to move forward and he feels like the world has come to an end but the leaves are falling off trees, proving him worng. He knows now that he will have to move on, but is not yet ready. The use of alliteration with the 'th' sound slow down the rhythm and show his struggle.
The last line, "And the woman calling" brings us back to the beggining and to the same conclusion, that he can hear her. This shows the cycle of life, that we will always end up where we begin. Sometimes we are happy and at otehr tiems we will go thorugh hardships, but they won't last forever, we will eventually move on. He hears her voice again, after the doubt showing that he knows he has to move on, but is not ready just yet.

| Posted on 2008-12-28 | by a guest




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