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Pied Beauty Analysis



Author: Poetry of Gerard Manley Hopkins Type: Poetry Views: 2653

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Glory be to God for dappled things --

For skies of couple-colour as a brinded cow;

For rose-moles all in stipple upon trout that swim;

Fresh-firecoal chestnut-falls; finches' wings;

Landscape plotted |&| pieced -- fold, fallow, |&| plough;

And {'a}ll trades, their gear |&| tackle |&| trim.

All things counter, original, sp{'a}re, strange;

Whatever is fickle, freckl{`e}d, (who knows how?)

With sw{'i}ft, sl{'o}w; sweet, s{'o}ur; ad{'a}zzle, d{'i}m;

He fathers-forth whose beauty is p{'a}st change:

Pr{'a}ise h{'i}m.










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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

This poem is about a man trying to catch trout on his farm! it talks about trout and the cows on his farm as well as some flying finches. the man is using his fishing gear and will sell the fish at the market. lastly he is praising god for the fish.

| Posted on 2012-03-11 | by a guest


.: :.

I know this is a few years late, but the person who tried to demean to student, it\'s amazing that you used the word spelt....the correct usage is spelled.
As a lesson, do not judge, but if you feel you MUST be an ___hole, then make sure your work is correct... I\'m just saying...

| Posted on 2011-07-17 | by a guest


.: :.

You all need to leave that student alone...people make typos...we aren\'t perfect. Second of all. This poem is about the glory of God. God did not create anything evil for those of you who put that. God cannot create anything evil for he is pure. If you don\'t know that then you should pick up your bible and read all 66 chapters of that wonderful love letter he wrote for us!

| Posted on 2011-03-15 | by a guest


.: :.

just a comment.syria
the poet is being thankful to almighty God ,who had created every single beauty with all it\'s greatness .
I mean the greatness of the creatures themselves no matter how big or small they are,and the most important thing that he is asking human being to do is to be thankful for these gifts.

| Posted on 2010-12-09 | by a guest


.: :.

Nice copy and paste from Spark Notes, earlier. The poem, both in form and in description, describe how diverse God\'s creation is, all the while linking these diversities together through alliteration, which parallels God\'s linking of these diverse things. The speaker is talking about God\'s creation as well as his own (the poem). The form, though following a rhyme scheme of A,B,C, changes at the end to A,C, as well as the final line being only two words, additionally frustrating the original form of the sonnet. It is also no longer a neat 10 lines, but eleven. The syllables in the lines are also sporadic, going 9,12,12,9,11,10, then 10,11,9,10,2. It shortens the sonnet from the two octaves to two sestets, but then frustrates the reader\'s expectations with pentet, skipping the \"B\" in rhyme scheme, as well as it being only two lines.

| Posted on 2010-11-02 | by a guest


.: :.

The poem is about a runner disillusioned with running. He praises people who dapple in other sport and do not focus all their attention on training. In his poem, he says that the landscape is "plotted and pieced" which suggests he recognizes that one's record becomes pieced together from good and bad races. The imagery shows his fading interest in what he has come to love and he claims that "beauty is past change" suggesting he no longer sees the attraction to running he used to. His intent to "Praise him" is a final cry to be recognized for his efforts on the track before he quits running forever.

| Posted on 2010-05-11 | by a guest


.: :.

the poem is about how God has created the world, with good and bad, and about how beauty can come from strange ugly places, you idiots!!!!

| Posted on 2010-02-28 | by a guest


.: :.

To the person who posted this: Just a tip for the literature student, its spelt special, not specil.. lets hope u still have a few more years of school left ahead of u lol

It is clear that due to the error in typing he missed out a word on "special" and wrote it as "specil" in which just an "a" is missing. You should probably get your head checked before picking on people.

| Posted on 2009-11-18 | by a guest


.: :.

It is imposible to know the mind of a truely good poet or writer through their works, often the poet or writer is sufficently good at their job they can take on the persona or views of others for on more reason than that they can. It is quite possible this poem was put together because the authour liked the way that dappled and stipple went together, or because a priest paid him to create a unique sonet we cannot tell and it really shouldn't matter so long as we enjoy the poem.

| Posted on 2009-08-23 | by a guest


.: :.

Hopkins's Poetry Gerard Manley Hopkins

"Pied Beauty" (1877)

Complete Text

Glory be to God for dappled things-- For skies of couple-colour as a brinded cow; For rose-moles all in stipple upon trout that swim; Fresh-firecoal chestnut-falls; finches' wings; Landscape plotted and pieced--fold, fallow, and plough; And áll trádes, their gear and tackle and trim. All things counter, original, spare, strange; Whatever is fickle, freckled (who knows how?) With swift, slow; sweet, sour; adazzle, dim; He fathers-forth whose beauty is past change: Praise Him.
Summary

The poem opens with an offering: "Glory be to God for dappled things." In the next five lines, Hopkins elaborates with examples of what things he means to include under this rubric of "dappled." He includes the mottled white and blue colors of the sky, the "brinded" (brindled or streaked) hide of a cow, and the patches of contrasting color on a trout. The chestnuts offer a slightly more complex image: When they fall they open to reveal the meaty interior normally concealed by the hard shell; they are compared to the coals in a fire, black on the outside and glowing within. The wings of finches are multicolored, as is a patchwork of farmland in which sections look different according to whether they are planted and green, fallow, or freshly plowed. The final example is of the "trades" and activities of man, with their rich diversity of materials and equipment.

In the final five lines, Hopkins goes on to consider more closely the characteristics of these examples he has given, attaching moral qualities now to the concept of variety and diversity that he has elaborated thus far mostly in terms of physical characteristics. The poem becomes an apology for these unconventional or "strange" things, things that might not normally be valued or thought beautiful. They are all, he avers, creations of God, which, in their multiplicity, point always to the unity and permanence of His power and inspire us to "Praise Him."

Form

This is one of Hopkins's "curtal" (or curtailed) sonnets, in which he miniaturizes the traditional sonnet form by reducing the eight lines of the octave to six (here two tercets rhyming ABC ABC) and shortening the six lines of the sestet to four and a half. This alteration of the sonnet form is quite fitting for a poem advocating originality and contrariness. The strikingly musical repetition of sounds throughout the poem ("dappled," "stipple," "tackle," "fickle," "freckled," "adazzle," for example) enacts the creative act the poem glorifies: the weaving together of diverse things into a pleasing and coherent whole.

Commentary

This poem is a miniature or set-piece, and a kind of ritual observance. It begins and ends with variations on the mottoes of the Jesuit order ("to the greater glory of God" and "praise to God always"), which give it a traditional flavor, tempering the unorthodoxy of its appreciations. The parallelism of the beginning and end correspond to a larger symmetry within the poem: the first part (the shortened octave) begins with God and then moves to praise his creations. The last four-and-a-half lines reverse this movement, beginning with the characteristics of things in the world and then tracing them back to a final affirmation of God. The delay of the verb in this extended sentence makes this return all the more satisfying when it comes; the long and list-like predicate, which captures the multiplicity of the created world, at last yields in the penultimate line to a striking verb of creation (fathers-forth) and then leads us to acknowledge an absolute subject, God the Creator. The poem is thus a hymn of creation, praising God by praising the created world. It expresses the theological position that the great variety in the natural world is a testimony to the perfect unity of God and the infinitude of His creative power. In the context of a Victorian age that valued uniformity, efficiency, and standardization, this theological notion takes on a tone of protest.

Why does Hopkins choose to commend "dappled things" in particular? The first stanza would lead the reader to believe that their significance is an aesthetic one: In showing how contrasts and juxtapositions increase the richness of our surroundings, Hopkins describes variations in color and texture--of the sensory. The mention of the "fresh-firecoal chestnut-falls" in the fourth line, however, introduces a moral tenor to the list. Though the description is still physical, the idea of a nugget of goodness imprisoned within a hard exterior invites a consideration of essential value in a way that the speckles on a cow, for example, do not. The image transcends the physical, implying how the physical links to the spiritual and meditating on the relationship between body and soul. Lines five and six then serve to connect these musings to human life and activity. Hopkins first introduces a landscape whose characteristics derive from man's alteration (the fields), and then includes "trades," "gear," "tackle," and "trim" as diverse items that are man-made. But he then goes on to include these things, along with the preceding list, as part of God's work.

Hopkins does not refer explicitly to human beings themselves, or to the variations that exist among them, in his catalogue of the dappled and diverse. But the next section opens with a list of qualities ("counter, original, spare, strange") which, though they doggedly refer to "things" rather than people, cannot but be considered in moral terms as well; Hopkins's own life, and particularly his poetry, had at the time been described in those very terms. With "fickle" and "freckled" in the eighth line, Hopkins introduces a moral and an aesthetic quality, each of which would conventionally convey a negative judgment, in order to fold even the base and the ugly back into his worshipful inventory of God's gloriously "pied" creation.

| Posted on 2009-04-18 | by a guest


.: :.

this poem is about an athiest who has no religion left he hates god, nature, and himself. The speaker wants to instill the hate he has for the world in his readers. The poem sends the message that god isn't real and that if he is the speaker would rather end up in hell than live in the ugly lanscape he does now.
^ The person who said the above statement is an idiot, do not listen to him.

| Posted on 2009-04-13 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem is about perfection. God is perfect, but he created this world to be imperfect, or pied/dappled etc. but those imperfections is what makes this world that God created is beautiful.

| Posted on 2009-03-30 | by a guest


.: :.

Just a note to the critic of the literature student, it's and let's have an apostrophe.

| Posted on 2009-03-13 | by a guest


.: :.

Just a note to the critic of the literature student, it's and let's have an apostrophe.

| Posted on 2009-03-13 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem is about nature and how, although everything is so different and imperfect, it's unified by its creator--God. Hopkins sees the beauty in the world--so flawed and seemingly broken--and praises God for it!

| Posted on 2009-02-17 | by a guest


.: :.

this poem is about the beauty of god; the eternal and unchangable one, being the creator of all things changing and beautiful

| Posted on 2009-01-13 | by a guest


.: :.

this poem is about an athiest who has no religion left he hates god, nature, and himself. The speaker wants to instill the hate he has for the world in his readers. The poem sends the message that god isn't real and that if he is the speaker would rather end up in hell than live in the ugly lanscape he does now.

| Posted on 2008-11-24 | by a guest


.: :.

Just a tip for the literature student, its spelt special, not specil.. lets hope u still have a few more years of school left ahead of u lol

| Posted on 2008-11-05 | by a guest


.: chris :.

The poem is about a woman. Of course, it would be inappropriate for Hopkins to write sexually, but by viewing the human body as a creation of God, he portrays his desire. The woman obviously has freckles, or some type of "dappling" as described in the poem. Everything about her is worth "praising God for," including the very work of her hands, the "trades." The woman could be unsure about her feelings for Hopkins, as he uses the word "fickle" in his description, but just as it is unknown why she is unsure it is unknown why she is so beautiful.

| Posted on 2008-05-11 | by a guest


.: Women :.

The poem is about a woman. Of course, it would be inappropriate for Hopkins to write sexually, but by viewing the human body as a creation of God, he portrays his desire. The woman obviously has freckles, or some type of "dappling" as described in the poem. Everything about her is worth "praising God for," including the very work of her hands, the "trades." The woman could be unsure about her feelings for Hopkins, as he uses the word "fickle" in his description, but just as it is unknown why she is unsure it is unknown why she is so beautiful.

| Posted on 2007-08-23 | by a guest


.: By a Literature student :.

The poem is about God as the creator of all natural beauty. The poet was vert into nature and most of his poems were about how God and nature went together and how God created nature. The poem is filled of natural images e.g. birds, etc, that show how beautiful things are. The write also coins phrases to show how beautiful and specil nature is such as 'rose-moles' and 'Fresh-firecoal' and 'fathers-forth'.

| Posted on 2007-01-14 | by a guest


.: Running :.

The poem is about a runner disillusioned with running. He praises people who dapple in other sport and do not focus all their attention on training. In his poem, he says that the landscape is "plotted and pieced" which suggests he recognizes that one's record becomes pieced together from good and bad races. The imagery shows his fading interest in what he has come to love and he claims that "beauty is past change" suggesting he no longer sees the attraction to running he used to. His intent to "Praise him" is a final cry to be recognized for his efforts on the track before he quits running forever.

| Posted on 2005-04-28 | by Approved Guest




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