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To A Mouse Analysis



Author: poem of Robert Burns Type: poem Views: 13


On Turning her up in her Nest with the Plough

Wee, sleekit, cow'rin', tim'rous beastie,
O what a panic's in thy breastie!
Thou need na start awa sae hasty,
Wi' bickering brattle!
I wad be laith to rin an' chase thee
Wi' murd'ring pattle!

I'm truly sorry man's dominion
Has broken nature's social union,
An' justifies that ill opinion
Which makes thee startle
At me, thy poor earth-born companion,
An' fellow-mortal!

I doubt na, whiles, but thou may thieve;
What then? poor beastie, thou maun live!
A daimen-icker in a thrave
'S a sma' request:
I'll get a blessin' wi' the lave,
And never miss't!

Thy wee bit housie, too, in ruin!
Its silly wa's the win's are strewin':
And naething, now, to big a new ane,
O' foggage green!
An' bleak December's winds ensuin'
Baith snell an' keen!

Thou saw the fields laid bare and waste
An' weary winter comin' fast,
An' cozie here, beneath the blast,
Thou thought to dwell,
Till, crash! the cruel coulter past
Out thro' thy cell.

That wee bit heap o' leaves an' stibble
Has cost thee mony a weary nibble!
Now thou's turned out, for a' thy trouble,
But house or hald,
To thole the winter's sleety dribble
An' cranreuch cauld!

But, Mousie, thou art no thy lane
In proving foresight may be vain:
The best laid schemes o' mice an' men
Gang aft a-gley,
An' lea'e us nought but grief an' pain,
For promised joy.

Still thou art blest, compared wi' me!
The present only toucheth thee:
But, oh! I backward cast my e'e
On prospects drear!
An' forward, tho' I canna see,
I guess an' fear!

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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||




.: :.

People in all countries receive the mortgage loans in various creditors, just because that\'s easy.

| Posted on 2013-03-15 | by a guest


.: :.

lovinnn life wae limmy XD #REQUIEM TO a MOUSE 17 mices and aw that...
#HOAW SEXY!?!?!?!?!?!?!?
.NOT YOU xD

| Posted on 2012-06-14 | by a guest


.: :.

Burns is highlighting man\'s delusion of separation from nature, his apology ... \"man\'s dominion has broken nature\'s social union\" suggests that man\'s perception of being a separate human ego allows the illusion of man being dominant, while in reality both the mouse and the man are \"earth-born companions and fellow mortals\" sharing unity in nature.
The mouse lives entirely in the moment without an ego, with no concern what will become of it in the future nor does it dwell on the past. In contrast Burns, the poet, laments for his self (thou art bless\'d compared wi\'me) - his suffering caused by the delusion of being a separate self that is fearful of the future and has regrets about the past.
Man\'s delusion of dominion is refuted by his inability to exert his will (the best laid schemes of mice and men gang aft agley) a philosophy which is consistent with current scientific understanding that free-will doesn\'t exist except as a construct within the minds of humans.

| Posted on 2010-09-30 | by a guest


.: :.

Hello, that is w very helpful article.. i translated that article and i liked it..
thak you very much..


| Posted on 2010-03-31 | by a guest


.: :.

By writing to a mouse, Burns establishes himself as a Romantic poet. Their love for nature is the defining element of all the romantic poets.
Given Burns' miserable past, it is obvious that Burns' relates to the mouse' predicament. The industrial revolution takes over the agrarian life, affected peasants everywhere (inc. burns), both are affected by hierarchy. Where there is not much chance of rising up the social ladder and both feel the pinch of inequality. Like the mouse, his plans for the future have crashed. Even with the success of some of his poems, he returned to poverty a few years later.
At the same time, Burns says the mouse is better off than he is, solely because the mouse only knows of the present. Burns on the other hand has to deal with his miserable past of poverty, lost love, and drinking problem. His future was just as bleak. He was physically weak, and still very poor.
It was only after his death that he won so much acclaim.
So, it can be said that "To a Mouse" does not only reflect Burns' compassion and sympathy for a homeless mouse, but his ability to associate himself with a lowly creature of the earth.
z

| Posted on 2009-04-11 | by a guest


.: :.

By writing to a mouse, Burns establishes himself as a Romantic poet. Their love for nature is the defining element of all the romantic poets.
Given Burns' miserable past, it is obvious that Burns' relates to the mouse' predicament. The industrial revolution takes over the agrarian life, affected peasants everywhere (inc. burns), both are affected by hierarchy. Where there is not much chance of rising up the social ladder and both feel the pinch of inequality. Like the mouse, his plans for the future have crashed. Even with the success of some of his poems, he returned to poverty a few years later.
At the same time, Burns says the mouse is better off than he is, solely because the mouse only knows of the present. Burns on the other hand has to deal with his miserable past of poverty, lost love, and drinking problem. His future was just as bleak. He was physically weak, and still very poor.
It was only after his death that he won so much acclaim.
So, it can be said that "To a Mouse" does not only reflect Burns' compassion and sympathy for a homeless mouse, but his ability to associate himself with a lowly creature of the earth.

| Posted on 2009-04-11 | by a guest


.: :.

Theme; "The best made plans of mice and men often go arrayed." The poem was the idea for the title of the famous novel by John Steinbeck, "Of Mice and Men", which had the poem's theme as it's theme.

| Posted on 2009-02-18 | by a guest


.: :.

This is a version of the poem that I came up with:
You don't need to be scared little mouse. I would be crazy to come after you to try to kill you.
I'm sorry humans have come into your natural world and frightened you. We are both residents of the Earth and almost brothers.
You might steal from me, but who cares? A mouse has to live just as I do. You take so little that I'll take what's left and never miss what is gone.
Your home too was ruined by the wind. Now you have nothing to rebuild it. The December winds are coming, wild and piercing.
You saw the fields laid bare by the fast coming winter, but you managed to stay warm here, away from the blast, until I have cruelly passed my plough through your safe place.
Living in those leaves have cost you many meals. Now for all of your trouble you are cast out with no house or home, into the winter's frosty cold.
But mouse, you aren't alone in proving foresight may be in vain. The best schemes of mice and men often go wrong, and they result in nothing but greif and pain, instead of promised joy.
Still, you are better off than I. You only worry about the present, whereas I also see the past with all of my mistakes, and look into the future, which I am unable to see. I guess and fear what is to come!
I hope this will beter help you understand the meaning of the poem.

| Posted on 2009-01-31 | by a guest


.: :.

Wee sleekest, cowering, timorous beastie,
O, what a panic's in thy breastie!
Thou need not start away so hasty,
With screaming scurry!
I would be loath to run and chase thee,
With a murd’ring shovel!
I'm truly sorry man's dominion
Has broken nature's social union,
And justifies that ill opinion
Which makes thee startle
At me, thy poor earth-born companion,
And fellow-mortal!
I doubt not, existing, thou may thieve;
What then? Poor beastie, thou must live!
An ear of corn in many sheaves
Is a small request:
I'll get a blessing with what's left,
And never miss it!
Thy wee bit house, it too, in ruin!
Its silly walls the winds are strewing:
And nothing, now, to build a new one,
but moss & lichen!
And bleak December's winds ensuing
Both wild and piercing!
Thou saw the fields laid bare and waste
And weary winter coming fast,
And cosy here, beneath the blast,
Thou thought to dwell,
Till, crash! The cruel plough blade passed
throughout thy cell.
That wee bit heap of leaves and stubble
Has cost thee many a weary nibble!
Now thou's turned out, for all thy trouble,
without house or home,
to endure winter's sleety drizzle
And frosty cold!
But, Mousie, thou art not alone
In proving foresight may be vain:
The best laid schemes o' mice an' men
Go oft awry,
An' leave us nought but grief and pain,
For promised joy.
Still thou art blessed, compared with me!
The present only toucheth thee:
But, oh! I backward cast my eye
On prospects drear!
An' forward, though I cannot see,
I guess and fear!
It does not scan as well!
But is easier to understand this quite profound poem.
We always plan for a better future
but more oten than not that promised joy does not materialise. We look to the past with all our baggage trailing behind and hope and pray our lives will get better when all we should be doing is enjoying the present.

| Posted on 2008-09-05 | by a guest


.: :.

This final verse reveals the absolute despondency that Burns was feeling at this stage in his life. Not at all what one might expect from a young man of twenty-six, supposedly so popular with the lassies, and with his whole life ahead of him, but nevertheless expressing sentiments with which many of us today can easily relate.

| Posted on 2008-08-20 | by a guest


.: :.

Wee, sleeket, cowran, tim'rous beastie,
O, what panic's in thy breastie!
Thou need na start awa sae hasty,
Wi' bickering brattle!
I wad be laith to rin an' chase thee,
Wi' murd'ring pattle!

I'm truly sorry Man's dominion
Has broken Nature's social union,
An' justifies that ill opinion,
Which makes thee startle,
At me, thy poor, earth-born companion,
An' fellow-mortal!



I doubt na, whyles, but thou may thieve;
What then? poor beastie, thou maun live!
A daimen-icker in a thrave 'S a sma' request:
I'll get a blessin wi' the lave,
An' never miss't!


Thy wee-bit housie, too, in ruin!
It's silly wa's the win's are strewin!
An' naething, now, to big a new ane,
O' foggage green!
An' bleak December's winds ensuin,
Baith snell an' keen!


Thou saw the fields laid bare an' wast,
An' weary Winter comin fast,
An' cozie here, beneath the blast,
Thou thought to dwell,
Till crash! the cruel coulter past
Out thro' thy cell.

That wee-bit heap o' leaves an' stibble,
Has cost thee monie a weary nibble!
Now thou's turn'd out, for a' thy trouble,
But house or hald.
To thole the Winter's sleety dribble,
An' cranreuch cauld!


But Mousie, thou are no thy-lane,
In proving foresight may be vain:
The best laid schemes o' Mice an' Men,
Gang aft agley,
An' lea'e us nought but grief an' pain,
For promis'd joy!

Still, thou art blest, compar'd wi' me!
The present only toucheth thee:
But Och! I backward cast my e'e,
On prospects drear!
An' forward, tho' I canna see,
I guess an' fear!

On turning her up in her nest, with the plough, November, 1785

The poet is doing his utmost to assure this terrified little creature that he has no intention of causing it any harm. bickerin’ brattle =scurry, run; laith = loath; pattle = a small spade for cleaning a plough
He then goes on to apologise to the mouse for the behaviour of mankind using beautiful prose which requires neither translation nor interpretation. Listen to what he is saying, and you will be well on your way to understand what made Burns such a greatly loved man. Note how he equates himself with the mouse in life’s great plan.
Here he tells the mouse that he realizes its need to steal the odd ear of corn, and he does not really mind. He’ll get by with remainder and never miss it. daimen = occasional; icker = an ear of corn; thrave = twenty four sheaves; lave = remainder
Dismay at the enormity of the problems he has brought on the mouse causes him to reflect on what he has done - destroyed her home at a time when it is impossible to rebuild. There is no grass to build a new home and the December winds are cold and sharp. Her preparations for winter are gone! Big = build; foggage = moss; baith = both
Where the mouse had thought that she was prepared for winter in her comfortable little nest in the ground, now she is faced with trying to survive in a most unfriendly climate, with little or no hope in sight. cosie = comfortable; coulter; = iron cutter in front of a ploughshare
It seems probable that here the poet is really comparing his own hard times with that of the mouse – a life of harsh struggle, with little or no reward at the end. monie = many; thole = to endure; dribble = drizzle; cranreuch = hoar-frost; cauld = cold
How many times have people glibly trotted out, “The best laid schemes” without realising that they were quoting from Burns? The sadness, the despair, the insight contained within this verse are truly remarkable and deeply moving. no ‘thy lane = not alone; gan aft agley = often go awry
This final verse reveals the absolute despondency that Burns was feeling at this stage in his life. Not at all what one might expect from a young man of twenty-six, supposedly so popular with the lassies, and with his whole life ahead of him, but nevertheless expressing sentiments with which many of us today can easily relate.

| Posted on 2008-08-20 | by a guest


.: Response :.

The 2007-05-30 guest I believe is using the Prentice Hall Literature book to answer its textbook questions. I have the Gerogia Student Edition-The British Tradition. It contains a lot of petry.

| Posted on 2008-03-26 | by a guest


.: :.

The mouse, as a common characteristic to this time period, is in tune with nature. Because he is in harmony with nature, the mouse only worries about the present action. The man envies this action and realizes that the mouse is far better off than he because he does not worry about the past and does not dread the future.

| Posted on 2008-02-12 | by a guest


.: :.

The mouse, as a common characteristic to this time period, is in tune with nature. Because he is in harmony with nature, the mouse only worries about the present action. The man envies this action and realizes that the mouse is far better off than he because he does not worry about the past and does not dread the future.

| Posted on 2008-02-12 | by a guest


.: Last Stanza :.

Personally, I think this is what he's trying to say:

Through all your trouble, you are still luckier than I,
You only worry about the present, whereas I look on the past on all my dreary memories and I look toward the future, scared for what's coming!


| Posted on 2007-08-06 | by a guest


.: Last Stanza :.

Personally, I think this is what he's trying to say:

Through all your trouble, you are still luckier than I,
You only worry about the present, whereas I look on the past on all my dreary memories and I look toward the future, scared for what's coming!


| Posted on 2007-08-06 | by a guest


.: :.

In the last stanza, what main idea is the speaker trying to tell?

Still thou art blest, compared wi' me!
The present only toucheth thee:
But, oh! I backward cast my e'e
On prospects drear!
An' forward, tho' I canna see,
I guess an' fear!

| Posted on 2007-05-30 | by a guest




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