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A Martian Sends A Postcard Home Analysis



Author: Poetry of Craig Raine Type: Poetry Views: 2942

Caxtons are mechanical birds with many wings

and some are treasured for their markings --they cause the eyes to melt

or the body to shriek without pain.I have never seen one fly, but

sometimes they perch on the hand.Mist is when the sky is tired of flight

and rests its soft machine on ground:then the world is dim and bookish

like engravings under tissue paper.Rain is when the earth is television.

It has the property of making colours darker.Model T is a room with the lock inside --

a key is turned to free the worldfor movement, so quick there is a film

to watch for anything missed.But time is tied to the wrist

or kept in a box, ticking with impatience.In homes, a haunted apparatus sleeps,

that snores when you pick it up.If the ghost cries, they carry it

to their lips and soothe it to sleepwith sounds. And yet they wake it up

deliberately, by tickling with a finger.Only the young are allowed to suffer

openly. Adults go to a punishment roomwith water but nothing to eat.

They lock the door and suffer the noisesalone. No one is exempt

and everyone's pain has a different smell.At night when all the colours die,

they hide in pairsand read about themselves --

in colour, with their eyelids shut.





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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

Does any one know what ideas are communicated about the human race ??

| Posted on 2012-06-24 | by a guest


.: :.

He is talking about a printer with Caxton, because it is one of the first british printers.

| Posted on 2012-01-13 | by a guest


.: :.

.: Poem Analysis from Bob :.
\"A Martian Sends a Postcard Home\" is a poem with seventeen stanzas. All of the stanzas have two lines. At first the title of this poem was kind of tricky for me because it made me think that it was about an actual Martian. It took me a while to figure out that he was talking about things that happen in everyday life in earth. Basically something a Martian would send home if he was on a vacation to earth is what the poem focuses on.
Analysis
Raine uses several riddles in this poem to show what the Martian sees when he comes to earth. He does a very good job in doing this. For example, the first stanza of the poem is talking about a book. Caxton was the first English printer of books. Mechanical birds with wings refers to the pages in a book. By saying they are treasured for their markings means that if a person enjoys reading a book they will treasure it. Raine also refers to a book in the next four lines.
Stanza six comes out straight forward and lets us realize that Raine is talking about fog. It uses words such as clouds. By using context clues we understand the true interpretation. When Raine says \"rain is when the earth is television\" he means that the TV is snowy. This is a very good metaphor for rain because it does kind of make the TV look like it is raining.
The seventh and eighth stanzas are talking about a car. This is simple as Raine refers to \"Model T.\" Raine gives good examples of the car in a Martian�s eyes. For instance, \"Model T is a room with the locks inside.\" I like this line a lot because I have never seen a car in this way before. Raine says it is a room because you go inside of the car and you are away from the outside world. You need a key to turn the car on and off and to lock the car.
In this next stanza Raine did a great job of describing a watch or clock. \"Ticking with impatience\" is right of the button. That is all a watch and clock do is tick for twenty four hours a day.
Stanza ten, eleven, and twelve are on the subject of a telephone. All the phone is what Raine writes in this poem. It does not do anything until you pick it up and that is what Raine is saying. The cries of the ghost is when it rings. Then you \"talk to it\", or answer it and when you are finished \"put it back to sleep\" or hang it up. Yes, we do \"deliberately wake it and tickle it with a finger\" when we answer it or call someone else.
A \"punishment room with just water\" is a bathroom. I just love these next three stanzas because I love the bathroom. I just don�t think of it as a \"punishment room.\" When Raine writes \"only the young are allowed to suffer openly\" he is talking about a baby getting their diapers changed in the open. Yet adults have to go to the bathroom and suffer our pain alone. Raine had exceptional use of metaphors to describe the bathroom.
The last two stanzas are about sleeping and dreaming. \"When the colours die\" is when we go to bed. \"Reading about ourselves with our eyelids shut\" is basically saying we are dreaming of ourselves. Raine put this at a good spot in the poem because the end of the poem symbolizes the end of the day.

| Posted on 2011-01-25 | by a guest


.: :.

you guys need to chill go with the flow and live your life not argue, SO SHUT THE HELL UP poetry is fun and is a way of getting your mesage across there is no ruels in poetry so. stop argueing k??
good
thank you il be here all night.

| Posted on 2010-12-14 | by a guest


.: :.

With regard to the idea that \"a film to watch for anything missed\" may refer to rear or side view mirrors: I don\'t think the Model T had either of these...the interpretation doesn\'t quite fit :\\

| Posted on 2010-11-08 | by a guest


.: :.

The chunk about the \"punishment room\" i think is about passing gas because the young and immature can \"suffer the noises\" openly but the adults have to go to the bathroom (\"punishment room with water but nothing to eat\") \"no one is exempt\" from gassing, and \"everyone\'s pain has a different smell.\" the noise, and smell and then adults not being allowed to do it in public all support that it\'s gas.

| Posted on 2010-10-13 | by a guest


.: :.

The Model T is obviously referring to a car. Any other interpretation of that line is just plain ridiculous.

| Posted on 2010-06-21 | by a guest


.: :.

All right, there is no need to tell what meant what...!
It is OPEN TO INTERPRETATION otherwise Craig Raine would have used a different method for writing this poem.
however keep in mind MODEL T WAS PRODUCED between 1908-1927. Raine, being born in 1944 probably has not personally used the vehicle. (new vehicles could have been) Yet interpretation is required, leaving NO RIGHT ANSWER, so quit being SMARTASSES, those of you who impose your way of seeing stuff.
In any case, I never heard of T Model TV...google doesn't have it so I don't know what to say.
PS: Im 15, Im not a Phd in anything...yet that does not mean i have no voice about it.
Peace
(oh and im researching this for school)

| Posted on 2010-04-22 | by a guest


.: :.

All right, there is no need to tell what meant what...!
It is OPEN TO INTERPRETATION otherwise Craig Raine would have used a different method for writing this poem.
however keep in mind MODEL T WAS PRODUCED between 1908-1927. Raine, being born in 1944 probably has not personally used the vehicle. (new vehicles could have been) Yet interpretation is required, leaving NO RIGHT ANSWER, so quit being SMARTASSES, those of you who impose your way of seeing stuff.
In any case, I never heard of T Model TV...google doesn't have it so I don't know what to say.
PS: Im 15, Im not a Phd in anything...yet that does not mean i have no voice about it.
Peace

| Posted on 2010-04-22 | by a guest


.: :.

OK, most people have said that the 'ghost' in the poem is a baby. At first glance it looks like this because you soothe a baby's cries, and maybe 'wake it up'...but it's a telephone. The ringing of the phone is the crying, and when you pick it up and talk into it, it stops (which is what the poem describes). Also, once it's quiet, you would wake it up by dialing (which is what 'tickling with a finger' is describing).

| Posted on 2010-04-07 | by a guest


.: :.

Half of you are dumbasses rread poetry for students volume 7

| Posted on 2010-04-05 | by a guest


.: :.

Half of you are dumbasses rread poetry for students volume 7

| Posted on 2010-04-05 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem is Craig Raines way of trying to show himself as above everyone else, he believes he is the "Martian" and this is his way of mocking society. The "Martian" is portrayed as looking at the world from above.
This man clearly thought that he was superior to others.
It is like he wrote this as a way to say- "ha look at me I am so superior you will never be able to interpret my poem"
Raine shows the familiar in an unfamiliar way much like Bedtime story by George Macbeth!

| Posted on 2010-03-28 | by a guest


.: :.

the part about the snoring could be a telephone as when you pick it up and dial a number it makes a repeated sound like snoring

| Posted on 2010-03-16 | by a guest


.: :.

the first 6 lines are talking about butterflies... not books... (:

| Posted on 2010-03-04 | by a guest


.: :.

Caxtons~ books
Model T~ car
Time tied to the wrist~ watch and clock (both)
Punishment room~ bathroom
Colours die~ dreaming

| Posted on 2009-11-25 | by a guest


.: :.

Hey everyone who thinks that Model T is a Television, why don't you search it up on the internet? It plainly shows that a model T is a car.

| Posted on 2009-10-06 | by a guest


.: :.

Model T is a car, the lock is in the inside (ignition), when you turn the key you free the world as from inside the car it looks as if you have set the world in motion, the film to watch anything missed is the rearview mirror.

| Posted on 2009-05-18 | by a guest


.: :.

I think that the "ghost" might be a baby. Babies can snore, When we pick them up, we can soothe them by singing (or just talking), and we wake them up by tickling them with a finger; i think this makes sense because the poem mentions the bodily functions of a baby (only the young are allowed to suffer openly). However, I think this poem is a brilliant piece of work because it allows for so much open interpretation, as well as opinions.

| Posted on 2009-05-07 | by a guest


.: :.

Model T can't be a recorder, remember or TV because the poem was written in 1979 and they didn't have VCRs or personal video cameras then. The a model T is a little late for the poem it is the best way to explain a world in a box "With locks on the inside."

| Posted on 2008-11-06 | by a guest


.: :.

In response to the recent posts concerning the debate over the correct interpretation of the 8th stanza, the head of my English faculty seemed quite certain that "for movement, so quick there is a film to watch for anything missed," refers to the rear view and side view mirrors. My colleagues and I agreed as this interpretation seems to make the most sense - especially as these objects are attached to, and inside of, the car itself. Hope this helps to enhance your understanding of the poem.

| Posted on 2008-07-14 | by a guest


.: Interpretation :.

Model t is a car. A ford car model. Not a television. there is no room inside a t.v. and expecially no lock INSIDE.
in stanza eight it would be impossible for him to talk about speed cameras because of the time it was written.

He is talking about a watch not a clock in stanza 9. when you tie a clock to your wrist its a watch.

| Posted on 2008-05-29 | by a guest


.: Martian sends a postcard :.

caxtons - books
Model T - television
sleeping apparatus - phone
punishment room - bathroom
Finishes poem with dreaming
I think this poem is a brilliant way of portraying the familiar in an unfamiliar way. There is controversy over whether 'Model T' is a car or a television. I think it is a television as you can have a video under a televison in which you can record anything you have missedwatch it at a later date does anybody else agree?But i also understand the MOdel T concept too. Argh! I am very confused :S

| Posted on 2008-05-17 | by a guest


.: :.

No, I think stanza 8 is about speed cameras monitering cars - i.e. "anything missed" is what the police etc don't see

| Posted on 2008-05-15 | by a guest


.: 8th stanza :.

I'm thinking that for the stanza "for movement, so quick there is a film to watch for anything missed," is referring to video cameras taping cars (racing?) and viewers can see the replays "for anything missed." it's a long stretch but does anybody else agree?

| Posted on 2007-08-30 | by a guest


.: Poem Analysis from Azzam :.

"A Martian Sends a Postcard Home" is a poem with seventeen stanzas. All of the stanzas have two lines. At first the title of this poem was kind of tricky for me because it made me think that it was about an actual Martian. It took me a while to figure out that he was talking about things that happen in everyday life in earth. Basically something a Martian would send home if he was on a vacation to earth is what the poem focuses on.
Analysis
Raine uses several riddles in this poem to show what the Martian sees when he comes to earth. He does a very good job in doing this. For example, the first stanza of the poem is talking about a book. Caxton was the first English printer of books. Mechanical birds with wings refers to the pages in a book. By saying they are treasured for their markings means that if a person enjoys reading a book they will treasure it. Raine also refers to a book in the next four lines.
Stanza six comes out straight forward and lets us realize that Raine is talking about fog. It uses words such as clouds. By using context clues we understand the true interpretation. When Raine says "rain is when the earth is television" he means that the TV is snowy. This is a very good metaphor for rain because it does kind of make the TV look like it is raining.
The seventh and eighth stanzas are talking about a car. This is simple as Raine refers to "Model T." Raine gives good examples of the car in a Martians eyes. For instance, "Model T is a room with the locks inside." I like this line a lot because I have never seen a car in this way before. Raine says it is a room because you go inside of the car and you are away from the outside world. You need a key to turn the car on and off and to lock the car.
In this next stanza Raine did a great job of describing a watch or clock. "Ticking with impatience" is right of the button. That is all a watch and clock do is tick for twenty four hours a day.
Stanza ten, eleven, and twelve are on the subject of a telephone. All the phone is what Raine writes in this poem. It does not do anything until you pick it up and that is what Raine is saying. The cries of the ghost is when it rings. Then you "talk to it", or answer it and when you are finished "put it back to sleep" or hang it up. Yes, we do "deliberately wake it and tickle it with a finger" when we answer it or call someone else.
A "punishment room with just water" is a bathroom. I just love these next three stanzas because I love the bathroom. I just dont think of it as a "punishment room." When Raine writes "only the young are allowed to suffer openly" he is talking about a baby getting their diapers changed in the open. Yet adults have to go to the bathroom and suffer our pain alone. Raine had exceptional use of metaphors to describe the bathroom.
The last two stanzas are about sleeping and dreaming. "When the colours die" is when we go to bed. "Reading about ourselves with our eyelids shut" is basically saying we are dreaming of ourselves. Raine put this at a good spot in the poem because the end of the poem symbolizes the end of the day.

| Posted on 2007-06-10 | by a guest


.: Poem Analysis from Azzam :.

"A Martian Sends a Postcard Home" is a poem with seventeen stanzas. All of the stanzas have two lines. At first the title of this poem was kind of tricky for me because it made me think that it was about an actual Martian. It took me a while to figure out that he was talking about things that happen in everyday life in earth. Basically something a Martian would send home if he was on a vacation to earth is what the poem focuses on.
Analysis
Raine uses several riddles in this poem to show what the Martian sees when he comes to earth. He does a very good job in doing this. For example, the first stanza of the poem is talking about a book. Caxton was the first English printer of books. Mechanical birds with wings refers to the pages in a book. By saying they are treasured for their markings means that if a person enjoys reading a book they will treasure it. Raine also refers to a book in the next four lines.
Stanza six comes out straight forward and lets us realize that Raine is talking about fog. It uses words such as clouds. By using context clues we understand the true interpretation. When Raine says "rain is when the earth is television" he means that the TV is snowy. This is a very good metaphor for rain because it does kind of make the TV look like it is raining.
The seventh and eighth stanzas are talking about a car. This is simple as Raine refers to "Model T." Raine gives good examples of the car in a Martians eyes. For instance, "Model T is a room with the locks inside." I like this line a lot because I have never seen a car in this way before. Raine says it is a room because you go inside of the car and you are away from the outside world. You need a key to turn the car on and off and to lock the car.
In this next stanza Raine did a great job of describing a watch or clock. "Ticking with impatience" is right of the button. That is all a watch and clock do is tick for twenty four hours a day.
Stanza ten, eleven, and twelve are on the subject of a telephone. All the phone is what Raine writes in this poem. It does not do anything until you pick it up and that is what Raine is saying. The cries of the ghost is when it rings. Then you "talk to it", or answer it and when you are finished "put it back to sleep" or hang it up. Yes, we do "deliberately wake it and tickle it with a finger" when we answer it or call someone else.
A "punishment room with just water" is a bathroom. I just love these next three stanzas because I love the bathroom. I just dont think of it as a "punishment room." When Raine writes "only the young are allowed to suffer openly" he is talking about a baby getting their diapers changed in the open. Yet adults have to go to the bathroom and suffer our pain alone. Raine had exceptional use of metaphors to describe the bathroom.
The last two stanzas are about sleeping and dreaming. "When the colours die" is when we go to bed. "Reading about ourselves with our eyelids shut" is basically saying we are dreaming of ourselves. Raine put this at a good spot in the poem because the end of the poem symbolizes the end of the day.

| Posted on 2007-06-10 | by a guest


.: Poem Analysis from Azzam :.

"A Martian Sends a Postcard Home" is a poem with seventeen stanzas. All of the stanzas have two lines. At first the title of this poem was kind of tricky for me because it made me think that it was about an actual Martian. It took me a while to figure out that he was talking about things that happen in everyday life in earth. Basically something a Martian would send home if he was on a vacation to earth is what the poem focuses on.
Analysis
Raine uses several riddles in this poem to show what the Martian sees when he comes to earth. He does a very good job in doing this. For example, the first stanza of the poem is talking about a book. Caxton was the first English printer of books. Mechanical birds with wings refers to the pages in a book. By saying they are treasured for their markings means that if a person enjoys reading a book they will treasure it. Raine also refers to a book in the next four lines.
Stanza six comes out straight forward and lets us realize that Raine is talking about fog. It uses words such as clouds. By using context clues we understand the true interpretation. When Raine says "rain is when the earth is television" he means that the TV is snowy. This is a very good metaphor for rain because it does kind of make the TV look like it is raining.
The seventh and eighth stanzas are talking about a car. This is simple as Raine refers to "Model T." Raine gives good examples of the car in a Martians eyes. For instance, "Model T is a room with the locks inside." I like this line a lot because I have never seen a car in this way before. Raine says it is a room because you go inside of the car and you are away from the outside world. You need a key to turn the car on and off and to lock the car.
In this next stanza Raine did a great job of describing a watch or clock. "Ticking with impatience" is right of the button. That is all a watch and clock do is tick for twenty four hours a day.
Stanza ten, eleven, and twelve are on the subject of a telephone. All the phone is what Raine writes in this poem. It does not do anything until you pick it up and that is what Raine is saying. The cries of the ghost is when it rings. Then you "talk to it", or answer it and when you are finished "put it back to sleep" or hang it up. Yes, we do "deliberately wake it and tickle it with a finger" when we answer it or call someone else.
A "punishment room with just water" is a bathroom. I just love these next three stanzas because I love the bathroom. I just dont think of it as a "punishment room." When Raine writes "only the young are allowed to suffer openly" he is talking about a baby getting their diapers changed in the open. Yet adults have to go to the bathroom and suffer our pain alone. Raine had exceptional use of metaphors to describe the bathroom.
The last two stanzas are about sleeping and dreaming. "When the colours die" is when we go to bed. "Reading about ourselves with our eyelids shut" is basically saying we are dreaming of ourselves. Raine put this at a good spot in the poem because the end of the poem symbolizes the end of the day.

| Posted on 2007-06-10 | by a guest


.: :.

Perhaps the 'punishment room' is a closed off room where adults go to drink alcohol (i the water, the different smells, and the children are not allowed to participate)
also maybe the last two lines are about sex (since it specifies 'in pairs').

| Posted on 2006-05-25 | by Approved Guest


.: martian sends... :.

caxtons - books. Model T - car. Apparatus - phone. Punishment room - bathroom. Finishes with dreams. Taking the real and making it new with clarity and accuracy. Realism, wonderfully condensed. Typical Raine. This poem has been extensively used on school syllabuses - because it provides a puzzle to get the students thinking, yet once the oblique objects are reworked it reveals an astounding simplicity. Raine's position is always one of reduction, condensing meaning into a small shape of words that heightens rather than dilutes its effecacy. This poem is one of his most famous, and rightly so.

| Posted on 2004-11-10 | by Approved Guest




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