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Song To Celia - II Analysis



Author: Poetry of Ben Jonson Type: Poetry Views: 1433

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Drink to me only with thine eyes,And I will pledge with mine;

Or leave a kiss but in the cup,And I'll not look for wine.

The thirst that from the soul doth riseDoth ask a drink divine;

But might I of Jove's nectar sup,I would not change for thine.I sent thee late a rosy wreath,Not so much honouring thee

As giving it a hope, that thereIt could not withered be.

But thou thereon didst only breathe,And sent'st it back to me;

Since when it grows, and smells, I swear,Not of itself, but thee.






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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

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I think this poem is a about a man who used to live perfectly with his wife but then they got divorced because he was always drunk and that is where the drinking part and the wine part comes in. Then in the second part i think that part is about the same man and how he misses his wife and is tying that together with his senses like how he smells :)

| Posted on 2012-02-02 | by a guest


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i think the message of it is all about a man who madly in love one girl \"the word madly is about the guy who can sacrifice everything he had.

| Posted on 2011-10-03 | by a guest


.: :.

the poem is an example of how love is more important for survival because man are always soft for emotions and woman are hard to face any break done. every person on this earth want love

| Posted on 2011-05-01 | by a guest


.: :.

I think he was a drunk and his wife left him because of that. He was saying that he would not trade a drink of ambrosia(the nectar of the gods) for her. He loves her more than wine. He recently sends her a rosy wreath, but she does not want it. He hopes that it will thrive there. The roses remind her of him and she sends them back. It doesn\'t smell like a rose it smells like her now.

| Posted on 2011-03-21 | by a guest


.: :.

this poem make me cum on her chest while her girl friend licks it all up and shit down her trought and then i have dirty but sex with my sluty lesbain girlfriend

| Posted on 2010-11-19 | by a guest


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i think the man just wants convey celia that he is really in love with her. That is a true love and she is it for him.

| Posted on 2010-03-04 | by a guest


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Learn, people, that the end of this poem is the most critical part. It is so obvious that he is madly in love with this woman. But more importantly it is that his love is unrequited; he sends her a rose and she sends it back! But this man does not throw away the rose but instead keeps it because it now smells less like a rose and more like her.

| Posted on 2010-02-24 | by a guest


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Its all about men who wants to be love again by the woman.

| Posted on 2009-07-15 | by a guest


.: :.

the story song to celia means the man very in love with the women jihjyweu uiyguytutnb x uy4 uit3 ur25 uyt36j y5

| Posted on 2009-06-25 | by a guest


.: :.

the story song to celia means the man very in love with the women

| Posted on 2009-06-25 | by a guest


.: :.

I sent thee late a rosy wreath,Not so much honouring thee
As giving it a hope, that thereIt could not withered be.
.

| Posted on 2008-08-29 | by a guest


.: poetry "song to celia II" :.

In the poetry, the man is madly in love with the women. What I think when the man said "leave a kiss but in the cup, and I'll not look for wine", is that he would take the drink from the cup that the women had merely touched with her lips, instead of his drink. And that what he meant that he would not look for wine is simply not to look for other love of another.
Throughout the poem, one can see the things that a man would do for a love.

| Posted on 2007-09-13 | by a guest


.: Song To Celia :.

Ben Johnson wrote numerous songs. "Song to Celia" is an example of carpe diem poetry, as it reminds the reader to live and love since time and youth are fleeting. This concept can be traced to Roman classics, as in Horace's line, "Seize the day, trust tomorrow as little as possible."
Jonson's classical form in "Song to Celia" owes much to the classic poets of Rome and Greece. For example, the rhyme scheme is the classical abcbabcb.
Also note that "Song to Celia" is a very skillful poetic treatment of quotations from the love letters of the Greek writer, Philostratus. Compare the opening lines of the first stanza of "Song to Celia" with Philostratus's Letter XXIV, "Drink to me with thine eyes only. Or, if thou wilt, putting the cup to thy lips, fill it with kisses, and so bestow it upon me."
Compare the opening lines of the second stanza with Letter XXX, "I sent thee a rosy wreath, not so much honouring thee (though this also is in my thoughts) as bestowing favour upon the roses, that so they might not be withered." The poet Lady Mary Wroth is probably the Celia to whom "Song to Celia" is dedicated.
Ben Jonson was born about 1573 and died in 1637. He was England's third Poet Laureate from 1619 to 1637.
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| Posted on 2007-08-25 | by a guest


.: poetry :.

Drink to me only with thine eyes,And I will pledge with mine;
Or leave a kiss but in the cup,And I'll not look for wine.
The thirst that from the soul doth riseDoth ask a drink divine;
But might I of Jove's nectar sup,I would not change for thine.I sent thee late a rosy wreath,Not so much honouring thee
As giving it a hope, that thereIt could not withered be.
But thou thereon didst only breathe,And sent'st it back to me;
Since when it grows, and smells, I swear,Not of itself, but thee.

| Posted on 2006-05-08 | by Approved Guest


.: :.

Drink to me only with thine eyes,And I will pledge with mine;
Or leave a kiss but in the cup,And I'll not look for wine.
The thirst that from the soul doth riseDoth ask a drink divine;
But might I of Jove's nectar sup,I would not change for thine.I sent thee late a rosy wreath,Not so much honouring thee
As giving it a hope, that thereIt could not withered be.
But thou thereon didst only breathe,And sent'st it back to me;
Since when it grows, and smells, I swear,Not of itself, but thee.

| Posted on 2005-11-29 | by Approved Guest




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