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Lenore Analysis



Author: Poetry of Edgar Allan Poe Type: Poetry Views: 3320

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Ah, broken is the golden bowl! the spirit flown forever!

Let the bell toll!- a saintly soul floats on the Stygian river;

And, Guy de Vere, hast thou no tear?- weep now or nevermore!

See! on yon drear and rigid bier low lies thy love, Lenore!

Come! let the burial rite be read- the funeral song be sung!-

An anthem for the queenliest dead that ever died so young-

A dirge for her the doubly dead in that she died so young.



"Wretches! ye loved her for her wealth and hated her for her pride,

And when she fell in feeble health, ye blessed her- that she died!

How shall the ritual, then, be read?- the requiem how be sung

By you- by yours, the evil eye,- by yours, the slanderous tongue

That did to death the innocence that died, and died so young?"



Peccavimus; but rave not thus! and let a Sabbath song

Go up to God so solemnly the dead may feel no wrong.

The sweet Lenore hath "gone before," with Hope, that flew beside,

Leaving thee wild for the dear child that should have been thy

bride.

For her, the fair and debonair, that now so lowly lies,

The life upon her yellow hair but not within her eyes

The life still there, upon her hair- the death upon her eyes.



"Avaunt! avaunt! from fiends below, the indignant ghost is riven-

From Hell unto a high estate far up within the Heaven-

From grief and groan, to a golden throne, beside the King of

Heaven!

Let no bell toll, then,- lest her soul, amid its hallowed mirth,

Should catch the note as it doth float up from the damned Earth!

And I!- to-night my heart is light!- no dirge will I upraise,

But waft the angel on her flight with a Paean of old days!"








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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

He didnt have \'many wives\' he had one that meant anything to him and broke off with another. Most of his poems involving \'the death of a beautiful woman\' were related to his wife, virginia clemm. Just because her name was not used, does not mean that it wasnt directed at her, its frequent in poetry that poets cover up the names of their targets.

| Posted on 2010-11-04 | by a guest


.: :.

しけし;;;;
well the name Lenore comes from greek and it's a variation of Eleanor but relates with Helen. It also means light. oh plus the raven is a black bird...it doesn't sound like an information but i tried....
(@ さ@).(+(し_(=け=)-);;

| Posted on 2009-01-30 | by a guest


.: :.

しけし;;;;
well the name Lenore comes from greek and it's a variation of Eleanor but relates with Helen. It also means light. oh plus the raven is a black bird...it doesn't sound like an information but i tried....
(@ さ@).(+(し_(=け=)-);;

| Posted on 2009-01-30 | by a guest


.: :.

Poe mentions Lenore, and isn't 'Helen' the Greek name of the same meaning? And hasn't he used Helen to cover up his wife's name in another peice of work?

| Posted on 2008-12-09 | by a guest


.: :.

Poe mentions Lenore, and isn't 'Helen' the Greek name of the same meaning? And hasn't he used Helen to cover up his wife's name in another peice of work?

| Posted on 2008-12-09 | by a guest


.: :.

Edgar's one and only "Lenore" has always been Eleonora Caligaia (wrongly quoted usually as "Galigai"), Concino Concini's wife.
Principal among their assassins in 1617 was a Conzaga, duke de Nevers, whence Edgar's "De Vere".
Greetings from Greece!

| Posted on 2008-07-15 | by a guest


.: :.

Can anyone tell me a further explanation of this poem. I need help on an english assignment please post by Wednesday, May 28, 2008

| Posted on 2008-05-27 | by a guest


.: :.

Here is a summary I found. I think it's pretty straight-foward.
It also explains Guy de Vere.
"Upon the death of a beautiful young woman named Lenore, a mourner (Stanza 1) praises her as "saintly" and reproaches her fianc, Guy de Vere, for not shedding tears. The mourner then suggests that the funeral begin and that everyone sing a song of lamentation for Lenore. De Vere (in Stanza 2) then accuses the mourner and his friends of hypocrisy, saying they loved only Lenore's wealth. He also says they slandered her. In Stanza 3, the mourner, acknowledging that he and his friends have faults, tells de Vere not to "rave" and renews his call for a solemn song. De Vere, he says, is angry because Lenore died before he could marry her. De Vere then says he will not mourn for Lenore but instead rejoice that her soul rose to heaven, to a golden throne reserved for her next to God Himself."

| Posted on 2008-05-24 | by a guest


.: Guy De Vere?? :.

I really dont understand what poe mean when he says ' Guy De Vere'?
Can anyone help me?
Its for an English Assignment.!

| Posted on 2008-05-22 | by a guest


.: Poe's wife :.

Poe only wrote one poem about his wife, who's name was Virginia. That poem is Eulalie. All of his other poems about women have to do with his other lady friends

| Posted on 2008-04-29 | by a guest


.: Poe's wife :.

Poe only wrote one poem about his wife, who's name was Virginia. That poem is Eulalie. All of his other poems about women have to do with his other lady friends

| Posted on 2008-04-29 | by a guest


.: Interesting... :.

That is an interesting question. I have observed this fact as well, and I believe that instead of having many wifes which meny people believe,he has but one, and simply uses differnt names to cover up the real one. I must admit, though; all of Poe's work that involve Lenore turn out to be my favorites. Perhaps this is part of the reason why "The Raven" is my favorite poem of all time.

| Posted on 2008-04-13 | by a guest


.: :.

I was wondering why he used the color golden to describe the throne "beside the king of Heaven" and the broken bowl at the beginning.

| Posted on 2008-03-12 | by a guest


.: :.

I believe that he uses this name for multiple reasons. Since it can be translated to mean light I think he is trying to convey the idea that these women that he writes about (whoever they may be) are the light is his life and the ones who brign him happiness yet it seems to get taken away and leave him in the dark. That is why his stories and poems seem to take place at night or have shadows after the deaths of the women. I'd love to hear your interpretation.

| Posted on 2008-02-27 | by a guest


.: :.

This is a curious one. It mentions many of his other works. The most Obvious one was Lenore was his poem "The Raven". He also brings in a lot of greek mythology to his stories. The Stygian River, in this story, I believe belongs to the Goddess of the underworld and her river of hatred? Or death. I can't quite remember.

An anthem for the queenliest dead that ever died so young-
A dirge for her the doubly dead in that she died so young.

Reminds me of one of his shortest and earlier poems. I don't believe i have this exactly, so please do not quote me on this. "...the lovely love to have ever died so young."

You can really tell this was about his wife. As was, the Raven. (Though, I think it was his wife, and mothers. in the raven.) But also, it mentions bells in this poem. Coincidence, possibly, but authors normally have a flow and style of writing based on experiances. So perhaps that could be clearified a bit more.
Then also, the evil eye, ties back to the story "Tell tale Heart", where an old man with supposedly "the evil eye" was murdered because of that single eye he had posessed.
Like all his other works. Simply brillant!

Sincerely,
Ally C.(KTN)

| Posted on 2007-11-08 | by Ally C. (KTN)


.: by a guest :.

I think that he is a very interesting man.I love his poems, especially The Raven, which talks about his wife. He says that he is never going to forget his wife Lenore and he suggests that heaven doesn't exist. Which, I, personally think it's not true.

| Posted on 2007-10-30 | by a guest


.: :.

I think that it is interesting that Poe uses the name Lenore, which is derived from the Greek name Helen, which means light. These names also appear in other works by Poe...coincidence? why do you think this is?
I thought it was quite interesting to think about. I have came up with a few theories myself, and thought it would be an interesting debate or discussion.

| Posted on 2007-03-02 | by a guest




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