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The Haunted Palace Analysis



Author: Poetry of Edgar Allan Poe Type: Poetry Views: 3388





In the greenest of our valleys

By good angels tenanted,

Once a fair and stately palace-

Radiant palace- reared its head.

In the monarch Thought's dominion-

It stood there!

Never seraph spread a pinion

Over fabric half so fair!



Banners yellow, glorious, golden,

On its roof did float and flow,

(This- all this- was in the olden

Time long ago,)

And every gentle air that dallied,

In that sweet day,

Along the ramparts plumed and pallid,

A winged odor went away.



Wanderers in that happy valley,

Through two luminous windows, saw

Spirits moving musically,

To a lute's well-tuned law,

Round about a throne where, sitting

(Porphyrogene!)

In state his glory well-befitting,

The ruler of the realm was seen.



And all with pearl and ruby glowing

Was the fair palace door,

Through which came flowing, flowing, flowing,

And sparkling evermore,

A troop of Echoes, whose sweet duty

Was but to sing,

In voices of surpassing beauty,

The wit and wisdom of their king.



But evil things, in robes of sorrow,

Assailed the monarch's high estate.

(Ah, let us mourn!- for never morrow

Shall dawn upon him desolate!)

And round about his home the glory

That blushed and bloomed,

Is but a dim-remembered story

Of the old time entombed.



And travellers, now, within that valley,

Through the red-litten windows see

Vast forms, that move fantastically

To a discordant melody,

While, like a ghastly rapid river,

Through the pale door

A hideous throng rush out forever

And laugh- but smile no more.



-THE END-

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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

Poe obviously wrote this poem to express his own mind and change into state of depression. :)

| Posted on 2013-05-28 | by a guest


.: :.

I believe the diction as well as the symbolism both point to signs of this not only being a poem of a man or head, but Poe himself. It interprets how once upon a time he was seen to be intellect, full of joy, \"golden\"(9); all pleasant thoughts. Soon the poem changes and everything written sparkling evermore once soon was a thought in the past. The haunted palace is Poe\'s mind.

| Posted on 2010-12-15 | by a guest


.: :.

Of course the interpretations for the poem written at the time would involve the abstract idea of a man\'s loss of his emotional stability. Today an old book of mine opened to this page and I read it seeing something insanely different. The more I read it, the more it revealed Neverland...with the final stanza very haunting. \"A hideous throng rush out forever and laugh-but smile no more.\" The Arvizos? The media? We lost our king because of their lust for money and fame.

| Posted on 2010-11-07 | by a guest


.: :.

Tuberculosis is an interesting basis for the poem. Whether for Lenore or another of his lost loves I will not speculate. Rather I think Poe was expressing his experience with crippling depression. The tone of the poem hinges on \"But evil things, in robes of sorrow,
Assailed the monarch\'s high estate.\"
So basically, I see it as being a literary description of deep depression caused an event (probably news of one of his loves death).
--Discordant Melody

| Posted on 2010-09-07 | by a guest


.: :.

my friend told me bout this poem. im using it for my forensics piece! i absolutly love it vause its dark but explaning love in a whole nother way!

| Posted on 2009-11-10 | by a guest


.: :.

Adam and Shavante must have been shot in the head because if you've actually read or studied Edgar Allan Poe's work properly it is talking about his love for a lady named "Lenore" who he had a relationship with. He lived in grief and sorrow for a long time because he loved her so passionately. If you were in his position, I think you horrible people would have turned out the same way, if not worse! His poetry is absoulutely amazing! xx iloveyouaaron!

| Posted on 2009-09-26 | by a guest


.: :.

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4F 44 21 21 21 20

| Posted on 2009-08-23 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem is pretty good.It actually gives me goosebumps and gives you a wierd feeling.I like this poem.

| Posted on 2009-05-13 | by a guest


.: :.

Poe uses a representation of an abstract or spiritual meaning through concrete and material forms to provide the image of a head when literally he is describing a palace. His use of figurative treatment of one subject under the guise of another illustrates how death comes, and how most individuals react to it. For most of our lives, we are sane people that are free of thoughts of death until we start to reach an age in which death becomes the key element that makes up thought and drives us nearly to insanity. The evil spirits in the palace are, metaphorically, thoughts of the inevitable demise of the being symbolized. “While, like a ghastly rapid river, through the pale door, a hideous throng rush out forever, and laugh-but smile no more” offers the allegory of the last stage of insanity before the being dies, because it is describing a wild and insane laughter, not caused by happiness, but instead caused by the fact that he knows that he is going to die from coughing up blood, most likely from tuberculosis.
--Hailey Curry
8th grade

| Posted on 2009-01-13 | by a guest


.: :.

Really, the palace itself represents a man. The Monarch Thought -- his thoughts, banners, yellow, glorious and golden on its roof -- the hair,
And every gentle air that dallied,
In that sweet day,
Along the ramparts plumed and pallid,
A winged odor went away -- the breath
Through two luminous windows -- the eyes
And all with pearl and ruby glowing -- the lips and teeth
Through which came flowing, flowing, flowing,
And sparkling evermore,
A troop of Echoes, whose sweet duty
Was but to sing,
In voices of surpassing beauty,
The wit and wisdom of their king -- singing what the thoughts command the lips to
While, like a ghastly rapid river,
Through the pale door
A hideous throng rush out forever
And laugh- but smile no more -- the man coughs up blood and dies of tuberculosis
the reason, i believe, that poe picked this disease over any other, was that he had so many encounters with this disease, for it stole the lives of many he loved.

| Posted on 2009-01-13 | by a guest


.: :.

I believe this peom is describing that death can be beautiful and he is explaining that spirits stay on earth to show people what the past was like and to tell the story of their life and death. It shows the transition they made between life and death: they are dancing and enjoying their afterlife party but then they leave the castle after they are attacked by the evil things in robes of sorrow and they come out laughing but not smiling at all. It seems, to me, that this peom is also in a way showing that your last moments on earth as a human will be repeatedly relived as a spirit. maybe im just crazy like poe or maybe niether of us are...
Ericalynn 10th grade

| Posted on 2009-01-11 | by a guest


.: :.

The image Poe intended for the reader to see is that of a head, but there is more to it than just that. The generalized meaning is that of which actually happened at the palace. The palace was a wonderful place at the center of the valley. There is evidence to prove that the king was having some form of party, or ball for that matter. The guests were dancing and having a wonderful time. The "evil things, in robes of sorrow," I believe, was actually the Red Death, or the bubonic plague. The king and his guests thought they were safe from it in the palace, but it did find them. They all died and their spirts can be seen through the windows of the palace. This is what literally happened at the palace, but Poe intended us to see a face in all of this. Perhaps the face of death, or maybe the face of a guest who's mind deteriorated after being infected by the plague.

| Posted on 2008-11-09 | by a guest


.: Review :.

This is one of the best poems Edgar Allan Poe has written. If you look at it in the view of a poet, it makes almost perfect sense. It leaves you with an eerie feeling, especially when it comes to that last line. "And laugh- but smile no more."

| Posted on 2007-12-03 | by a guest


.: Reading Class-Sixth Grade :.

I think that it was really good, but he is sometimes psycho and stuff. I liked it though because it was crazy.

Shavante

He's gone crazy apparantly because someone shot him in the head or he is losing his mind or something like that.

Adam

| Posted on 2007-10-19 | by a guest


.: Reading Class :.

This was about a freaky, crazy, knocked in the head man. He was hit in the head with a pipe or something. No, I did not like it because it should have been scarier like a horror book. The man needs to go to a psychiatrist or something.

Grady

| Posted on 2007-10-17 | by a guest


.: Mrs. Weeks's Class :.

Well, it's a man who has gone crazy and he is trying to get mad and losing his mind. That is all. Sometimes I liked studying this poem because it is a story. I'll give you a hint: You wouldn't even imagine how much you could make a story from a poem and you didn't even hear it yet.

| Posted on 2007-10-17 | by a guest


.: Metaphors :.

Well, I agree that it is about a head, or a person.
Here are some hints for readers:
(a, in the poem, is a metaphor for b. b is described.
a=b)
Palace=mind
'banners...float and flow'=blonde hair
windows=eyes
spirits=thoughts
lute's well-tuned law=sanity
porphyrogene=reference to royalty/perfection of a mind in control of its thought. the conciousness sitting on its throne.
palace door=mouth
pearl and ruby= tooth and gum
flowing, sparkling echoes= beautiful spoken thoughts (of a sane mind)
wit and wisdom of their king= the thoughts of the (king) consciousness
evil things=things deteriorating the sanity
high estate= mind
'ah, let...desolate!'=lose touch with reality, another normal-tomorrow will never come
'and, round...blushed and bloomed'=around his (home) mind is his facial expression, once full of blooming light and personality
travellers within valley=people who meet him
'through the red-litten...smile no more'=strange thoughts in his (windows) eyes, strange words out his (door) mouth, insane laughing...
This poem essentially represents the mental fall of Roderick Usher.
--Edahsrevlis

| Posted on 2007-04-23 | by a guest


.: The truth :.

This poem is aboutmore than just a head that was once sane. Thispoem is about Poe himself. If youlook at his life as he was growing up, you will see this. Poe as a youngster was evidently a genius. But as he started to grow up he had to deal with the death of his mother, abandonment of his father, and the death of his step mother. He also had to deal with the death of a classmate's mother, and he had to live with never being good enough to his step father. Soon after, he turned to gambling and dropped out of school to join the army. This poem is a chronological depiction of his life from childhood to his death.

| Posted on 2006-05-05 | by Approved Guest


.: What it's about :.

The poem is about a head. Each paragraph describes a different part of a once sane head that has now gone mad, hence the maniacal laughter at the end. It starts with the hair, then to the eyes, next the mouth, and then ends on the brain which has turned 'desolate' and is haunted...the person in the poem has gone mad.
On the surface, this is a straight-forward, spooky, campfire poem whose meaning is superficial and is, in fact, about a haunted palace. The allegorical meaning behind it becomes more appearent, however, in a closer second reading. The way the poem is split up, the diction that is used, and the denouement with the mad laughter at the end, proves that there is most definitely a hidden meaning, which I think can be agreed, it is that of a head.

~Sharlene

| Posted on 2005-12-08 | by Approved Guest


.: Theme analyze :.

this is a theme analysis, according to what I understand.

The palace was the most beautiful building of its day but that was long ago. Now it is ruined but ghosts haunt it as if it was still perfect. Travellers passing can see them through the window, ghostly musician still at work.
The castle was attacked and sacked and the beauty that was present is but a dim memory. 8 travellers see different ghosts that was descordently, and disappear through the door - a huge army of manic depressive

By Albert

| Posted on 2005-05-03 | by Approved Guest




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