famous poetry
| Famous Poetry | Roleplay | Free Video Tutorials | Online Poetry Club | Free Education | Best of Youtube | Ear Training

Spring & Fall Analysis



Author: Poetry of Gerard Manley Hopkins Type: Poetry Views: 1339

Sponsored Links





to a young child

Margaret, are you grieving

Over Goldengrove unleaving?

Leaves, like the things of man, you

With your fresh thoughts care for, can you?

Ah! as the heart grows older

It will come to such sights colder

By |&| by, nor spare a sigh

Though worlds of wanwood leafmeal lie;

And yet you w{'i}ll weep |&| know why.

Now no matter, child, the name:

Sorrow's springs are the same.

Nor mouth had, no nor mind, expressed

What h{'e}art h{'e}ard of, gh{'o}st gu{'e}ssed:

It is the blight man was born for,

It is Margaret you mourn for.










Sponsor



Learn to Play Songs by Ear: Ear Training

122 Free Video Tutorials

[Video Tutorial] How to build google chrome extensions

Please add me on youtube. I make free educational video tutorials on youtube such as Basic HTML and CSS.

Free Online Education from Top Universities

Yes! It's true. Online College Education is now free!



||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

This really helped me with my english 12 poetry test thanks. Add me on facebook. Anna Banman

| Posted on 2012-02-07 | by a guest


.: :.

The narrator is speaking to a young girl who is upset because of the leaves falling off of trees in the fall (\"Goldengrove unleaving\"). Whether Goldengrove is actually a reference to the specific town in England or a grove of trees crowned with golden leaves is unimportant. What the word Goldengrove suggests is an idyllic shelter from the real world (maybe representative of the innocence of childhood). The child is grieving because as the leaves fall away her protective shelter is diminished and she is exposed to the bitterness of understanding that things die. The narrator next draws a direct comparison between leaves and the things of man, noting that she cares for them both. Then he tells her that when she grows older, he heart will not be so excitable and she will look upon life and death cycles with a much colder eye. She will be numb to the death of leaves and also perhaps to the passing of people because she will understand the inevitability of mortality. So it is poem that charts the growth from innocence to experience. But this is not a particularly happy or optimistic lesson conveyed by the narrator. The narrator himself seems melancholic. He sadly accepts the inevitability of human mortality, but seems almost bitter about the knowledge. The end of the poem is the narrator\'s conclusion that this first grief for the leaves falling is really born out of Margaret\'s beginning realization of her own mortality. I am unclear about whether the narrator is perhaps envious of the child and her state of innocence and her passion for life and all living things, as compared to the numbness and terrible knowledge that he seems to possess. Or is he simply impartially seeing the world as it exists? I dive into the fact that Hopkins was a Catholic priest and some of the religious imagery in the poem, but it\'s worth noting.

| Posted on 2011-01-19 | by a guest


.: :.

The narrator is speaking to a young girl who is upset because of the leaves falling off of trees in the fall (\"Goldengrove unleaving\"). Whether Goldengrove is actually a reference to the specific town in England or a grove of trees crowned with golden leaves is unimportant. What the word Goldengrove suggests is an idyllic shelter from the real world (maybe representative of the innocence of childhood). The child is grieving because as the leaves fall away her protective shelter is diminished and she is exposed to the bitterness of understanding that things die. The narrator next draws a direct comparison between leaves and the things of man, noting that she cares for them both. Then he tells her that when she grows older, he heart will not be so excitable and she will look upon life and death cycles with a much colder eye. She will be numb to the death of leaves and also perhaps to the passing of people because she will understand the inevitability of mortality. So it is poem that charts the growth from innocence to experience. But this is not a particularly happy or optimistic lesson conveyed by the narrator. The narrator himself seems melancholic. He sadly accepts the inevitability of human mortality, but seems almost bitter about the knowledge. The end of the poem is the narrator\'s conclusion that this first grief for the leaves falling is really born out of Margaret\'s beginning realization of her own mortality. I am unclear about whether the narrator is perhaps envious of the child and her state of innocence and her passion for life and all living things, as compared to the numbness and terrible knowledge that he seems to possess. Or is he simply impartially seeing the world as it exists? I dive into the fact that Hopkins was a Catholic priest and some of the religious imagery in the poem, but it\'s worth noting.

| Posted on 2011-01-19 | by a guest


.: :.

The narrator is speaking to a young girl who is upset because of the leaves falling off of trees in the fall (\"Goldengrove unleaving\"). Whether Goldengrove is actually a reference to the specific town in England or a grove of trees crowned with golden leaves is unimportant. What the word Goldengrove suggests is an idyllic shelter from the real world (maybe representative of the innocence of childhood). The child is grieving because as the leaves fall away her protective shelter is diminished and she is exposed to the bitterness of understanding that things die. The narrator next draws a direct comparison between leaves and the things of man, noting that she cares for them both. Then he tells her that when she grows older, he heart will not be so excitable and she will look upon life and death cycles with a much colder eye. She will be numb to the death of leaves and also perhaps to the passing of people because she will understand the inevitability of mortality. So it is poem that charts the growth from innocence to experience. But this is not a particularly happy or optimistic lesson conveyed by the narrator. The narrator himself seems melancholic. He sadly accepts the inevitability of human mortality, but seems almost bitter about the knowledge. The end of the poem is the narrator\'s conclusion that this first grief for the leaves falling is really born out of Margaret\'s beginning realization of her own mortality. I am unclear about whether the narrator is perhaps envious of the child and her state of innocence and her passion for life and all living things, as compared to the numbness and terrible knowledge that he seems to possess. Or is he simply impartially seeing the world as it exists? I dive into the fact that Hopkins was a Catholic priest and some of the religious imagery in the poem, but it\'s worth noting.

| Posted on 2011-01-19 | by a guest


.: :.

The narrator is speaking to a young girl who is upset because of the leaves falling off of trees in the fall (\"Goldengrove unleaving\"). Whether Goldengrove is actually a reference to the specific town in England or a grove of trees crowned with golden leaves is unimportant. What the word Goldengrove suggests is an idyllic shelter from the real world (maybe representative of the innocence of childhood). The child is grieving because as the leaves fall away her protective shelter is diminished and she is exposed to the bitterness of understanding that things die. The narrator next draws a direct comparison between leaves and the things of man, noting that she cares for them both. Then he tells her that when she grows older, he heart will not be so excitable and she will look upon life and death cycles with a much colder eye. She will be numb to the death of leaves and also perhaps to the passing of people because she will understand the inevitability of mortality. So it is poem that charts the growth from innocence to experience. But this is not a particularly happy or optimistic lesson conveyed by the narrator. The narrator himself seems melancholic. He sadly accepts the inevitability of human mortality, but seems almost bitter about the knowledge. The end of the poem is the narrator\'s conclusion that this first grief for the leaves falling is really born out of Margaret\'s beginning realization of her own mortality. I am unclear about whether the narrator is perhaps envious of the child and her state of innocence and her passion for life and all living things, as compared to the numbness and terrible knowledge that he seems to possess. Or is he simply impartially seeing the world as it exists? I dive into the fact that Hopkins was a Catholic priest and some of the religious imagery in the poem, but it\'s worth noting.

| Posted on 2011-01-19 | by a guest


.: :.

haha same this help me in an english test tommorrow. im only 13 so i really cant understand this thx for all the help

| Posted on 2010-06-17 | by a guest


.: :.

Thanks for all the information and analyzing guys, you really helped me. I actually used this site to study for an English exam and the analyses really were spot on.
Once again thanks to everyone who contributed.

| Posted on 2010-05-20 | by a guest


.: :.

To the last poster, mine was the posting before yours re Autumn leaves.
That Virgil quote is beautiful and my family used it as a memorial to my late brother who died before his time.

| Posted on 2010-04-29 | by a guest


.: :.

Quoting Virgil: "Sunt lacrimae rerum et mentum mortalia tangunt"
These are the tears of things,
and the stuff of our mortality cuts us to the heart.
In memory of Josephine Mary Donnelly... I love you mom.

| Posted on 2010-04-13 | by a guest


.: :.

Quoting Virgil: "Sunt lacrimae rerum et mentum mortalia tangunt"
These are the tears of things,
and the stuff of our mortality cuts us to the heart.
In memory of Josephine Mary Donnelly... I love you mom.

| Posted on 2010-04-13 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem essentially addresses the same subject as John Everett Millais’ painting ‘Autumn Leaves’.
The young and naïve not fully understanding the transience of life.
A beautiful poem, a beautiful painting.

| Posted on 2009-10-26 | by a guest


.: :.

To the first poster: this poem was written a century before _Goldengrove_, the novel you mention. If anything, the author of the novel borrowed their title from Hopkins.

| Posted on 2009-10-16 | by a guest


.: :.

There is a reference here to Goldengrove, which is a book where a young girl, Nico, lost her older sister, Margaret. I think this poem deals with Nico try to mourn and understand the fact that her sister is dead.

| Posted on 2009-09-28 | by a guest


.: :.

the poet to his imaginery child margeret :
the child seems grievimg for the fall of the leaves like the man who cares for the fresh ones by his thoughts and leave the older one by his heart and mind as he gets eperienced through his ages every sorrow are truely the raising of the spring which gives the clearence to the life.eve though his heart gets experienced of the truth of life he grieves for every death or sorrow as he knew that one day he too wants to fall and it is for him he grieves.

| Posted on 2009-06-04 | by a guest


.: analysis :.

A child matures when they realize that life is defined by both good and bad, spring and
fall. To have one, you need the other. Some people take this realization and can’t handle
it. and kill themselves or live in misery all their lives. Others accept this revelation, making
it easier to go through the hard times of life. Compared to fall, spring is almost too
beautiful. But fall can be beautiful too. It just depends on how you see it.
The first two lines ask ‘Margaret are you grieving, over Goldengrove unleaving’?
Goldengrove is the world through the child’s eyes. It seems that world is unleaving, or
fading away to the child. The third stanza compares leaves to the things of man. Margaret
has an understanding of nature, so she realizes that mans mortality is the same as natures.
It’s always going through spring and fall. The poem states that as you grow older, you
will see sights colder. Then the poems eighth line says, ‘through worlds of wanwood
leafmeal lie’. These two lines state that, even though the idea of goldengrove seems so
big, there is a much bigger world beyond the boundaries of goldengrove, full of death and
decay.
At this point, Margaret seems to go through an acceptance of life, and weeps. She
has more of an understanding of why she weeps. The feeling Margaret weeps for is
grief that everyone feels throughout life. In the tenth and eleventh lines, it is stated that
every sorrow comes from the same source, but this sorrow will help you understand death
and loss.
In the twelve line, the poem describes that this understanding of the grief and death is
not spoken of or able to be thought of, but is automatically understood by the heart,
maybe as you experience it more as you get older. It is personally understood as you go
through losses and sadness. In the thirteenth line, ‘what heart heard of’, the poem is
saying that the heart takes on this emotion. The next line, the fourteenth line,
goes, ‘it is the blight man was born for’, blight meaning a disease that harms or destroys.

| Posted on 2008-03-17 | by a guest


.: A father's message? :.

A father tells his child the truths about grief and life, life and death. He explains it in a colder, less sensitive manner than what a mother may do. The child cannot understand this yet. She is too young to know the truths, atrocities and concerns that will learn as she grows older. Right now, it is just her world, not just herself, she cries for - the leaves that fall in autumn, the sun that fades after the summer, the death of life that is upon us - but she does not know why. She cannot know, because she is only a child. She hasn't learnt this yet. What is death? What is the loss of one's self anyway?

| Posted on 2004-11-04 | by Approved Guest




Post your Analysis




Message

Free Online Education from Top Universities

Yes! It's true. College Education is now free!







Most common keywords

Spring & Fall Analysis Gerard Manley Hopkins critical analysis of poem, review school overview. Analysis of the poem. literary terms. Definition terms. Why did he use? short summary describing. Spring & Fall Analysis Gerard Manley Hopkins Characters archetypes. Sparknotes bookrags the meaning summary overview critique of explanation pinkmonkey. Quick fast explanatory summary. pinkmonkey free cliffnotes cliffnotes ebook pdf doc file essay summary literary terms analysis professional definition summary synopsis sinopsis interpretation critique Spring & Fall Analysis Gerard Manley Hopkins itunes audio book mp4 mp3 mit ocw Online Education homework forum help



Poetry 34
Poetry 103
Poetry 158
Poetry 71
Poetry 144
Poetry 197
Poetry 62
Poetry 178
Poetry 221
Poetry 204
Poetry 12
Poetry 15
Poetry 63
Poetry 173
Poetry 195
Poetry 18
Poetry 25
Poetry 42
Poetry 23
Poetry 68