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Tiger , The Analysis



Author: Poetry of William Blake Type: Poetry Views: 7301





Tyger! Tyger! burning bright

In the forest of the night

What immortal hand or eye

Could frame thy fearful symmetry?



In what distant deeps or skies

Burnt the fire of thine eyes?

On what wings dare he aspire?

What the hand dare seize the fire?



And What shoulder, and what art,

Could twist the sinews of thy heart?

And when thy heart began to beat,

What dread hand? and what dread feet?



What the hammer? what the chain?

In what furnace was thy brain?

What the anvil? what dread grasp

Dare its deadly terrors clasp?



When the stars threw down their spears,

And watered heaven with their tears,

Did he smile his work to see?

Did he who made the lamb make thee?



Tyger! Tyger! burning bright

In the forests of the night,

What immortal hand or eye

Dare frame thy fearful symmetry?










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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

what does what the chain? what the hammer stand for?? HELP!!!!

| Posted on 2014-01-19 | by a guest


.: :.

yo fam dis boi drake yeh hes a pussio still. man died at 38 init cuz of bad foot. i will juke man if he eva return u get me. on big tingz out er now. swere down.

| Posted on 2013-02-06 | by a guest


.: :.

With regard to the comment made by: Sheila D Ivy, B.A. July 2011, how on earth can you consider your comment to be grammatically valid? I quote: \'I have memorized it twice\' if you memorized it twice as you suggest,you clearly did not memorise it the first time. unless you are a clear amnesiac, although you could not be for you would not recall the intitial memorising. you have lied to us and therefore disgracing this website and William Blake\'s fine efforts.My next point, \'This poem is NOT about...God\' and then you go on to say \'Perhaps this is also in hommage to a potential creative God\' what the hell? you clearly are contradicting yourself and your point of a not very well polished synopsis is evident throughout,your assumptions of a more agnostic feel for the poem is unfounded, given the time in question when this was written, even if Blake can be paraphrased as writing in poetic format \' Thou read Bible day and night, but ye read black, whereas i read white\' suggesting reading between the lines. In conclusion, you failed miserably, for he was clearly on about A.A.Milne\'s work and was an avid fan of tigger. :)

| Posted on 2012-03-28 | by a guest


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Can someone PLEASE tell me what i should do to make this poem into a short story PLEASE that would be much appropriated !

| Posted on 2012-02-17 | by a guest


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What i think is God made the lamb but he also made the tiger..cant have life without darkness..cant have life without death...

| Posted on 2011-12-26 | by a guest


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What is think is God made the lamb but he also made the tiger..cant have life without darkness..cant have life without death...

| Posted on 2011-12-26 | by a guest


.: :.

Tyger! Tyger! burning bright
In the forest of the night
What immortal hand or eye
Could frame thy fearful symmetry?
In what distant deeps or skies
Burnt the fire of thine eyes?
On what wings dare he aspire?
What the hand dare seize the fire?.i think the meaning of this part is all Blake thinks that all he will see is destruction and corruption in the world when he dies and he wonders who will be there to take him GOD or the DEVIL?

| Posted on 2011-12-02 | by a guest


.: :.

None of you are right.
The Tiger is the perfect beast. Thus the \"fearful symmetry\" part
\"Tiger Tiger burning bright\" is referring to the color on the tiger. \"In the forests of the night\" is where the tiger lives \"What immortal hand or eye, could frame thy fearful symmetry?\" He is asking a question. What being could possibly control it. The tiger is a perfect beast...

| Posted on 2011-07-17 | by a guest


.: :.

I have long wondered about this powerfully beautiful and mysterious poem. I have memorized it twice. Sometimes, after lying dormant or accepted \"as-is\" in my own mind for decades, I suddenly have a taste of insight or a new line of thought to explore. I don\'t offer a polished explanation or the brilliant analysis of an English Lit college professor, but, this is my room to broadcast my own thoughts, to everybody and to nobody, available to all, but who might stumble upon me? This poem is NOT about the Industrial Revolution, nor God, nor good vs. evil or sin and grace, etc. I know this much. I feel that this poem is about Youth. The Tiger is the fresh, virile young man resplendent in his prime and power, and his domain is \"the forest of the night\" where he prowls, hunts, fights, where he can sometimes get lost in life\'s difficult challlenges laid before him, about his beauty and potential to become a man, and about this time in life for us all, male and female alike. It is about Man, and the wonder of him. \"What the hammer, what the chain/ in what furnace was thy brain?\" In Blake\'s time things were mechanically fashioned, or sculpted or forged. Who or what could have fashioned us? Perhaps this is also in hommage to a potential creative God, who creates, with power like no other, and the secrets he keeps about himself, whether he is called Jehovah, Jesus or Shiva. We just ARE, and HOW we are, a wonderment and a beauty, filled with danger and the potential for the greatest gift of all, love. The tiger, youth, mankind, our inventions...creation and potential, the Tiger has capacity for danger, and like man, he must kill to eat, and eat to live. We are all tigers, killers, but not guilty beings on our way to Hell. Blake followed his universal wonderment with images that appeared to him. In this way, he wrote about several things at once, as I have tried to lay out as I explore the meaning, first as Youth, then as Man, then as the Cosmic Being, (Einstein the agnostic theist\'s concept of the powerful, ambivalent spinner of planets and giver of order, all the while busy with such things), and perhaps about Mystery, all with the common thread of power and wonder, not without wholesome fear. I leave with this: there IS no quick or definitive solution, no single, unilayered answer to Blake\'s lovely puzzle, and in this fact I find the most beauty of all, not unaided by the powerful, mysterious and technically brilliant music he gave us to sing about and analyze for years to come. There is nothing more vexing nor more attractive to the curious mind of man than the Unknown. Maybe this is part of the appeal of Blake\'s poem, itself wonderful in all ways.
Sheila D Ivy, B.A. July 2011

| Posted on 2011-07-04 | by a guest


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The poem is not about good and evil. The lamb is gentle and the tiger is feared. Both were placed on the planet by God.

| Posted on 2011-06-12 | by a guest


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The poem is not about good and evil. The lamb is gentle and the tiger is feared. Both were placed on the planet by God.

| Posted on 2011-06-12 | by a guest


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the tiger is man and the fearful symetry is sin and the lamb is God
-Leo a 16yr old high school student

| Posted on 2011-05-16 | by a guest


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Brilliance on paper! Sad that he was considered insane, he was a genius to have thought this up. Great reveiw, too, because I must sing this tomorrow for choir.

| Posted on 2011-04-12 | by a guest


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it\'s really a visionary poem A/Q the poet view ,The tiger is treated as a terrific animal or u can say a creature and in other hand there is a lamb which indicate / signify the softness ....here both the creatures are created by the same creator but see what\'s a big difference between them.
here poet is wondered after seeing the eyes of the tiger ( because he saw lots of brightness in the tiger\'s eye)
and comparing the imagination power of the creator with himself .he also talking about the creator\'s dare which for carrying the fire (brightness) in his hand .and from where he would find this fire for the tigers.
at last he just comparing the creators opinion why both i mean lamb and tiger at the same place (on earth)
here poet wants to say the no one is here (on the earth ) who can create a creature like the tiger and the lamb on the same place....

| Posted on 2011-03-22 | by a guest


.: :.

i am so kool that i craked this poem ... itz bout good and evil and my m8 blake is askin whether the same god created both good an evil (tiger & lamb) and blakeys confused and a bit mad which is why he committed suicide when he was 38 in 1863

| Posted on 2011-01-19 | by a guest


.: :.

I don\'t believe the poem was a direct commentary on the Industrial Revolution as suggested by earlier analyses posted below, but was rather framed by the times; much in the way Blake wonders what immortal hand or eye could frame the Tyger\'s fearful symmetry.
Imagine Blake himself, a romantic poet living in a world of ancient literature and art. He was a strange anachronism who studied the mysterious arts of a bygone age-- but finds himself alive during a period of time unlike any other; where an education in the art and culture of long ago is suddenly far less important or necessary, than the imaginations of inventors and engineers whose time is now at hand to bring their own creativity to the forefront.
In Blake\'s poem, the clues do not point towards a man railing against the twin tides of industry and scientific progress, but rather one who wonders what place there remains for men like him in this new world. Who will still study or care about a classical education and keep alive all the wonderful things that Blake himself found magical?
The Tyger is the symbol of something mysterious and indescribable, or at least something that is made less enjoyable by fully understanding it. The true irony is that Blake is describing himself and his own work when he descibes the tiger. For instance, how many people these days would seek out and read a poem by a man long dead in his grave and feel transported by the magical rhythm and delicate strange language? And if you could explain this poem very easily, wouldn\'t it lose a lot of it\'s mystery and the very thing that makes it so intriguing in the first place? If Blake \"framed\" the poem by writing it plainly, it would lose it\'s magic.
The Tyger Blake puts forth is a creature that defies explaination much like \'the Christmas Spirit\', \'The Beatles\' or being gathered around the campfire. The Tyger is a sense or spirit we all understand but find that is loses something in the telling, like; \"When people gather around a campfire its usually a warm and comfortable time of reflection and sometimes you go into a gentle trance looking at the flames\" hardly substitutes the experience of actually having been there.
What immortal hand or eye would it take to be able to write down or look at something like this and be able to sum it up in a single idea?
As for Blake\'s Tyger, he wonders in what dark and decidedly unhuman realm were these sensations crafted? In what unconscious and undiscoved chamber of our own minds are these sensations understood?
In an age where people struggled to unmake each new mystery as quickly as it could be presented, what importance will be placed on those things not birthed of glass and steel, or that cannot be pinioned under the scrying eye of a microscope?
In the Tyger, Blake is writing a Valentine to the stuff of eternity that, much like \'a Magician\'s Tryck Reveal\'d\' suffers so much in it\'s revelation.
Now if you\'ll excuse me, I\'ve got to get back to watching Jerry Springer. Jer-ry! Jer-ry! Jer-ry!

| Posted on 2010-10-24 | by a guest


.: :.

wats da main theme of da poem?need an ansa lyk a.s.a.p...preparing 4 an exam,peace

| Posted on 2010-10-18 | by a guest


.: :.

i thought when i first read it it meant about a...tiger...but oblivously it doesnt so i been thinking what does it really meant and when i read \"And when the stars throw down their spears, And watered heaven with their tears, Does he smile his work to see? Did he who made the lamb made thee?\" means war i think... and god since god is HE.

| Posted on 2010-10-14 | by a guest


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All analysis above are potentially correct. \"The tyger\" basically is God\'s work, he\'s beautiful yet harmful because in order to survive he must kill. Lamb, pure and innocent. Did the same God whom created Tyger(evil) also create the lamb(good)? The comparesment is to a blacksmith, both God and the Blacksmith made things that kill such as animals, people, and weapons of mass destruction. The poem is just a brief description of good and evil. what the hammer? what the chain? means what the hell what the earth.

| Posted on 2010-09-18 | by a guest


.: :.

i think this is a very beautiful poem and i dont have much more to say about it. i know thats not much compared to everyone elses comments and i honestly dont care.

| Posted on 2010-08-19 | by a guest


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this poem is not about the tiger, as most people assume after one read and little analysis but instead about its creator. Do people agree?

| Posted on 2010-03-27 | by a guest


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This poem does have a deep meaning, it isn't just about mere animals ( the tiger and the lamb) but in fact it talks about the good and evil coexisting together in the world.

| Posted on 2010-03-16 | by a guest


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hey you guys i have been working on this too and i do not think it is too hard if yo get on task, first jot out all the points like where the setting is and things like that then organize where you want to put what and that is basically it you will be done, its simple as it sounds.

| Posted on 2010-03-08 | by a guest


.: :.

Blake was regarded in his time as very strange, but many of his ideas make sense to the modern reader. When this poem was written it was most unusual for writers to show interest in wild animals. People did not have access to wildlife documentaries on television, as we do today: exotic animals might be seen in circuses and zoos, but tigers would be a rarity, perhaps turning up stuffed or as rugs (this was to become very common in the 19th century). Just as today the tiger is a symbol of (endangered) wildlife, so for Blake, the animal is important as a symbol - but of what? One clue is to be found in the comparison with The Lamb (see the next poem, and the fifth stanza of this one). Blake's images defy simple explanation: we cannot be certain what he wants us to think the tiger represents, but something of the majesty and power of God's creation in the natural world seems to be present.
Blake's spelling in the title (The Tyger) at once suggests the exotic or alien quality of the beast. The memorable opening couplet (pair of rhyming lines) points to the contrast of the dark "forest of the night" (which suggests an unknown and hostile place) and the intense "burning" brightness of the tiger's colouring: Blake writes here with a painter's eye.

| Posted on 2010-03-08 | by a guest


.: :.

"Tyger, Tyger" was my chosen poem from my last semester in college taking this course as an English fulfillment class I wanted to learn from. I was a much older student with my husband. After memorization, I had recitation in class. I found Blake's spelling and wording and poetry interesting.
The longer analysis of several guests here have a type of understanding of the poem, but they forget or never were involved in a church experience of a personal relationship with God nor knew how the devil works to destroy perfection or walked away not understanding it at an early age.
Going away to college at an early age with just one's peers and being exposed to certain professors can take away one's identity and values. I know this as I studied this philosophy way before college and had to warn students much younger than me what they were being indoctrinated with.
In Blake's poem, "Tyger Tyger" jealousy in the heavens above from the mightest and most beautiful angel God created, took 1/3 of the fallen angels God had to kick out of a perfect Paradise of Heaven or Heaven wouldn't be perfect anymore. Good and evil can't live together nor peaceably.
God created Adam and then Eve out of one of his ribs to be a helpmate to each other and avoid lonliness with both of them to forever be in a Paradise of no evil nor harm. The animals (lion laying down with the lamb, for instance) were at peace and never would harm one another nor man nor woman. God created animals for their enjoyment, too. Who would want to leave a place like that?!
Think of the the tiger and the lamb (complete opposites after Adam's and Eve's fall); they had no need for anything as God gave them a totally peaceful Garden with fresh fruits to eat. But the "snake" (devil) tempted Eve to eat of the "Tree of Knowledge" (not an apple tree) to be like God and know good from evil and be just like God which was a lie Eve fell for and Adam tried to blame on Eve. There you have the first couples fight!
As a result of this sin, they were warned about ahead of time, Adam and Eve had to suffer consequences that would be forever on this Earth. This brought sin upon our World. Man was to toil by his brow in hard work as women would suffer in pain as figuritive in child birth.
Until God's Son, Jesus, returns, this is how the Earth will be with much pain, sorrow, earthquakes, floods, asking why and how come this evil has come about them. Tsunamies, wars, killing, murder, lying, cheating, plotting evil against another for another's demise, and as spoken about way back then of the furture in 2 Timothy in the New Testament how this generation would be. Good and evil would keep struggling against itself in and on the Earth and towards mankind. The rain falls upon the good and evil, but God protects the good.
The poem stresses this theme throughout with good vs evil. We have a choice just as Eve and Adam had. God gave them FREE CHOICE with THEIR OWN FREE WILL to obey Him to be totally happy or disobey. God didn't create any of us to be puppets He could control. And they didn't realize until it was too late what their actions brought upon the rest of mankind/womankind on Earth, including murder of brothers Cain killing Able.
God is just like our Earthly father, if we are blessed to have one who loves his children so much he'd do anything for them for their good, but if they don't listen to his wisdom, they are punished for their own good or die from their folly of less wisdom and maturity. No parent NOT worth that name, "daddy", is the opposite of our Creator. One who has been blessed as a daughter to be a "daddy's girl" experiences life on Earth as happy knowing who loves her, where to go to when she needs answers, or needs that hug, or wants that kiss to make things better, and as an example of what a man she should marry when she is older. In the end, God will wipe every tear from our eyes and restore us IF we live as we were meant to. Good ALWAYS conquers evil!

| Posted on 2010-02-22 | by a guest


.: :.

what the hammer what the chain means is like saying what on earth
/what the hell?

| Posted on 2010-02-20 | by a guest


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HELP ME! ive got to hand this in by monday!
help meeee
poppy

| Posted on 2010-02-20 | by a guest


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I am writing a essay on this poem!! Plz I need all the help i can get!! I need a legit thesis statement!! God bless

| Posted on 2010-02-08 | by a guest


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Hi!!.. I'm _ _. _ from PCSHS....help me please in this poem..."The Lamb" and "The Tiger"...Tnx:D
Pray 4 yah!!

| Posted on 2009-10-27 | by a guest


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Hi my name is austin and i am also working on a project... Help!

| Posted on 2009-04-23 | by a guest


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Hi Emily, I have a daughter your age and I teach at a school. I think your analysis is spot on. If you have done the industrial revolution in history (my subject) you can comment about Blake likening the Tiger and the Lamb with the good and bad brought about by the industrial revolution. Don't forget people worked very long hours in the factories and the cities were filthy, very crowded and full of disease, much more unhealthy than the countryside where the workers for the factories had come from. Average age of death in Manchester at this time 23 years. I think he is saying that God has made a terrible thing (in Blake's eyes)yet it is beautiful and fearful. God is either capable of mistakes or has made this beautiful deadly creature for reasons that are beyond man's understanding. Hope this helps. Keep up the good work.
Mark

| Posted on 2009-04-14 | by a guest


.: :.

Hi! i am Emily. i am 13 years old and doing a report on a poem of my choice. i choose this one. This was what i thought the poem was about:
I think that William Blake is talking about god. He is explaining how great yet terrible the tiger is. He ask the reader what kind of immortal creature (meaning god) could make such a thing. At the end he compares the tiger to a lamb by asking if the same god created them both.
Please comment on my analysis if you can. i would really like to hear feed-back! Thank you!

| Posted on 2009-04-06 | by a guest


.: :.

The Tyger represents the raw, unadulterated forces of Nature. Wild. Untamable. The potential for destruction, yet also mesmerizingly beautiful for it simply IS. What immortal hand or eye dare frame thy fearful symmetry? Did the same God who created Law and Order, Rules and Civilization, also create such an icon of Wildness and Destruction?
It is a glimpse of the real nature of the World, beyond all the rules and forms of Men (the hammer and chains of human society, used to keep men down, small). Like spotting a wildfire deep in the heart of a forest, yet with a living consciousness.
Blake railed against the British reserve and conservatism. This poem expresses his soul-felt calling to BE as fully present in the World, with all of our flaws and passions, as possible. That God desires men to be passionate and not subservient and submissive. It is a theme that he carries throughout much of his work - that our true natures are large, wild, and yearning to be free of the strictures we have placed upon them.

| Posted on 2009-03-19 | by a guest


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maybe you guys are taking this poem way to seriously, not all poems have to have some secret meaning to it i made one out of nothing ,semi long and rambled through part, but it was still enough to inpress the9th grade teacher at our school and im in the seventh sixth at the time. anyways my point is it may not be some comparing oposing opposites, maybe he was trying to explain a problem without explaining it, or just wrighting to clear his mind like i did, then again you maybe right who knows

| Posted on 2009-02-22 | by a guest


.: :.

what does : What tjhe hammer? what the chain,
mean

| Posted on 2009-01-19 | by a guest


.: :.

I think that Blake was like any of frusrated people who didnt get a satisfactory philosophy about life.

| Posted on 2008-11-25 | by a guest


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I read this poem at age 16. The first book that hooked me into being a reading addict at the first lines I had read.. TIGER, tiger, burning bright
In the forests of the night,-... Blood and Chocolate. A good small book to start off young aged readers. Also, Silver Kiss is nice. I found Blood and Chocolate under my desk in High-school. A true god sent.

| Posted on 2008-11-13 | by a guest


.: :.

The Tyger by William Blake is a poem that expresses how much William Blake hates the industrial revolution: What immortal hand or art could twist the sinews of thy heart? means what god could allow something like this to start and spin out of control? Twist the sinews basically means to make the muscle and bone. The Tyger is also asking if god is really perfect to let such a thing happen? Who created the tyger? God, the devil or a combination of the two. He thinks the combination. And what shoulder and what art refers to opposites: brains and brawn. God and the devil are opposites. It is also literal though, in that you need smarts and strength to create the industrial revolution. The tyger also refers to how beautiful and evil the tyger is, it is good, because of improvement in technology, or is it awful because of pollution (though he didn't know this) and weapons. It also wonders if perhaps we stole technology from god when it refers to Prometheus and Icarus. And, at the end of the poem, wondering when the world finally (not yet) saw the worst side of the revolution, was this greater being pleased? How could someone who created love and peace create this tiger of beauty, power, destruction, and dependency?

| Posted on 2008-10-21 | by a guest


.: The Tyger Analysis :.

William Blake contrasts the beauty (symmetry) and dreadfulness/fearfulness of the Tiger. He does this to use the Tiger as an example for his overall question in the poem. He repeatedly asks, "who created the Tiger?" Throughout the poem he makes many allusions to God and the Devil. His questions ask, "who would dare create something so vicious yet beautiful as the Tiger?" This question is rhetorical, which means that he's really doubting the full benevolence or perfection of God. He does this through his example of the Tiger, but also through his allusions of Prometheus stealing fire from the gods: "What the hand dare seize the fire?" This allusion uses fire as an example (as Prometheus stole fire from the gods and gave it to man.) Fire is beautiful, and it can cook and warm, yet it can kill and burn as well. This comparison is used similarly to the Tiger. He also makes a Christian allusion to Lucifer's rebellion against god: "When the stars threw down their spears, / And watered heaven with their tears, / Did he smile his work to see?" The second line of this quotation talks of the myth that when the rebel angels were defeated, their tears created the milky way. So it then asks if the creator (God or the Devil) smiled or was happy in this creation of the milky way, as the milky way is beautiful, but was created from a rebellion against God which created Hell.
The industrialized diction found in the fourth stanza has the same effect that the Tiger, fire and the milky way have. Anvils and Hammers or industry in general can help mankind creating beautiful art or useful tools, but industry can also create weapons.
One very important fact about William Blake is that he was very interested in Gnosticism. This poem directly reflects the Gnostic view of Abraxas (who is comparable to the Christian god). Yet Gnosticism believes that Abraxas is a combination of both good and evil, or God and the Demiurge (the Devil). They believe that Abraxas is imperfect, just as Blake is proving in this poem. He's giving examples of how the creator is imperfect or not fully benevolent.

| Posted on 2008-04-08 | by a guest


.: :.

The poem "The Tyger" is a criticism of the Industrial Revolution by Blake. Picture the caution stripes on a freight train, yellow and black. The Tyger is not an animal, that's why he spelt it with a 'y'. Symmetry refers to the fact that a tiger is the only perfectly symmetrical animal on earth, giving it a sense of awesome power and uniqueness. "on what wings..." and "what hand dare seize the fire" refer to Icarus and Prometheus, two Greek heroes. Icarus challenged the Gods by creating flight, and Prometheus gave mankind fire, and hence the ability of science.
"shoulder" and "art" are opposites, the first being strength, the second being knowledge. Blake is saying that to create such a 'creature' one must be extraordinary in both these things.
"and when thy heart began to beat" is the ignition, the beginning of the mass productions that spawned in England. The "dread hands" and "dread feet" shows the rapid progression to a full bodied creation. The poem then shows the 'tyger' that we (man) have created, and how we lost control of it. "in what furnace was thy brain?" shows it has a mind of its own, in a place no man can go to switch it off. This juggernaut that is plundering out of control composed of all things industrial; chains, hammers, anvils, furnaces.
"Stars throwing spears" is comets, a thing a mystery. They have always appeared at great events, like the fall of the Roman Empire. "did He smile" refers to mankind again, blake believed we made God from the good things we did. In this stanza, blake is asking if we a proud of what we have done, if we like the smog and the overpopulation and the horrific occurrences brought on my the industrial revolution.
The last stanza is there to reiterate his point, and leave you pondering this enigmatic poem. The "Dare" is a warning not to let such an atrocity happen again.

| Posted on 2005-07-26 | by Approved Guest




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