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Lines composed a few miles above Tintern Abbey Analysis



Author: Poetry of William Wordsworth Type: Poetry Views: 13415





Five years have past; five summers, with the length

Of five long winters! and again I hear

These waters, rolling from their mountain-springs

With a soft inland murmur.--Once again

Do I behold these steep and lofty cliffs,

That on a wild secluded scene impress

Thoughts of more deep seclusion; and connect

The landscape with the quiet of the sky.

The day is come when I again repose

Here, under this dark sycamore, and view

These plots of cottage-ground, these orchard-tufts,

Which at this season, with their unripe fruits,

Are clad in one green hue, and lose themselves

'Mid groves and copses. Once again I see

These hedge-rows, hardly hedge-rows, little lines

Of sportive wood run wild: these pastoral farms,

Green to the very door; and wreaths of smoke

Sent up, in silence, from among the trees!

With some uncertain notice, as might seem

Of vagrant dwellers in the houseless woods,

Or of some Hermit's cave, where by his fire

The Hermit sits alone.

These beauteous forms,

Through a long absence, have not been to me

As is a landscape to a blind man's eye:

But oft, in lonely rooms, and 'mid the din

Of towns and cities, I have owed to them

In hours of weariness, sensations sweet,

Felt in the blood, and felt along the heart;

And passing even into my purer mind,

With tranquil restoration:--feelings too

Of unremembered pleasure: such, perhaps,

As have no slight or trivial influence

On that best portion of a good man's life,

His little, nameless, unremembered, acts

Of kindness and of love. Nor less, I trust,

To them I may have owed another gift,

Of aspect more sublime; that blessed mood,

In which the burthen of the mystery,

In which the heavy and the weary weight

Of all this unintelligible world,

Is lightened:--that serene and blessed mood,

In which the affections gently lead us on,--

Until, the breath of this corporeal frame

And even the motion of our human blood

Almost suspended, we are laid asleep

In body, and become a living soul:

While with an eye made quiet by the power

Of harmony, and the deep power of joy,

We see into the life of things.

If this

Be but a vain belief, yet, oh! how oft--

In darkness and amid the many shapes

Of joyless daylight; when the fretful stir

Unprofitable, and the fever of the world,

Have hung upon the beatings of my heart--

How oft, in spirit, have I turned to thee,

O sylvan Wye! thou wanderer thro' the woods,

How often has my spirit turned to thee!

And now, with gleams of half-extinguished thought,

With many recognitions dim and faint,

And somewhat of a sad perplexity,

The picture of the mind revives again:

While here I stand, not only with the sense

Of present pleasure, but with pleasing thoughts

That in this moment there is life and food

For future years. And so I dare to hope,

Though changed, no doubt, from what I was when first

I came among these hills; when like a roe

I bounded o'er the mountains, by the sides

Of the deep rivers, and the lonely streams,

Wherever nature led: more like a man

Flying from something that he dreads, than one

Who sought the thing he loved. For nature then

(The coarser pleasures of my boyish days,

And their glad animal movements all gone by)

To me was all in all.--I cannot paint

What then I was. The sounding cataract

Haunted me like a passion: the tall rock,

The mountain, and the deep and gloomy wood,

Their colours and their forms, were then to me

An appetite; a feeling and a love,

That had no need of a remoter charm,

By thought supplied, nor any interest

Unborrowed from the eye.--That time is past,

And all its aching joys are now no more,

And all its dizzy raptures. Not for this

Faint I, nor mourn nor murmur, other gifts

Have followed; for such loss, I would believe,

Abundant recompence. For I have learned

To look on nature, not as in the hour

Of thoughtless youth; but hearing oftentimes

The still, sad music of humanity,

Nor harsh nor grating, though of ample power

To chasten and subdue. And I have felt

A presence that disturbs me with the joy

Of elevated thoughts; a sense sublime

Of something far more deeply interfused,

Whose dwelling is the light of setting suns,

And the round ocean and the living air,

And the blue sky, and in the mind of man;

A motion and a spirit, that impels 0

All thinking things, all objects of all thought,

And rolls through all things. Therefore am I still

A lover of the meadows and the woods,

And mountains; and of all that we behold

From this green earth; of all the mighty world

Of eye, and ear,--both what they half create,

And what perceive; well pleased to recognise

In nature and the language of the sense,

The anchor of my purest thoughts, the nurse,

The guide, the guardian of my heart, and soul

Of all my moral being.

Nor perchance,

If I were not thus taught, should I the more

Suffer my genial spirits to decay:

For thou art with me here upon the banks

Of this fair river; thou my dearest Friend,

My dear, dear Friend; and in thy voice I catch

The language of my former heart, and read

My former pleasures in the shooting lights

Of thy wild eyes. Oh! yet a little while

May I behold in thee what I was once,

My dear, dear Sister! and this prayer I make,

Knowing that Nature never did betray

The heart that loved her; 'tis her privilege,

Through all the years of this our life, to lead

From joy to joy: for she can so inform

The mind that is within us, so impress

With quietness and beauty, and so feed

With lofty thoughts, that neither evil tongues,

Rash judgments, nor the sneers of selfish men,

Nor greetings where no kindness is, nor all

The dreary intercourse of daily life,

Shall e'er prevail against us, or disturb

Our cheerful faith, that all which we behold

Is full of blessings. Therefore let the moon

Shine on thee in thy solitary walk;

And let the misty mountain-winds be free

To blow against thee: and, in after years,

When these wild ecstasies shall be matured

Into a sober pleasure; when thy mind

Shall be a mansion for all lovely forms,

Thy memory be as a dwelling-place

For all sweet sounds and harmonies; oh! then,

If solitude, or fear, or pain, or grief,

Should be thy portion, with what healing thoughts

Of tender joy wilt thou remember me,

And these my exhortations! Nor, perchance--

If I should be where I no more can hear

Thy voice, nor catch from thy wild eyes these gleams

Of past existence--wilt thou then forget

That on the banks of this delightful stream

We stood together; and that I, so long

A worshipper of Nature, hither came

Unwearied in that service: rather say

With warmer love--oh! with far deeper zeal

Of holier love. Nor wilt thou then forget,

That after many wanderings, many years

Of absence, these steep woods and lofty cliffs,

And this green pastoral landscape, were to me

More dear, both for themselves and for thy sake!





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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

So far my understanding on the poem by Wordsworth is concerned normally he writes the poem taking very tiny usual and insignificant subject from the nature and writes about it. In the process of writing he colors the subject in such a way that the object itself some time becomes life like and dear and darling to the poet. Mainly he takes subject from his observation in the past and now he expresses his feeling in the present regarding the subject.
Among this type of poem the aforementioned poem is also about his memory in the past and now after five years he is expressing his feelings regarding the subject.
But in the process what he finds is that the change in perspective and feeling towards the subject. The feeling before 5 years and after 5 years are different. The perspective changes along the change in time but one thing is sure that all perspective led to the poetic creation .
While writing this poem in each and every stanza he writes his varieties of feeling during past to the present.

| Posted on 2011-07-17 | by a guest


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Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey is about William Wordsworth, and his longing to return to this special place a few miles above Tintern Abbey which he absolutely adores. We can see he has been away from this place for five years, and he always thinks about this magical place with its steep lofty cliffs and its beautiful scenery. He loves the mountain cliffs and springs. He loves the quiet, it gives him a chance to stop and think; seclusion.

| Posted on 2010-11-28 | by a guest


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It\'s typical of 18th century poets, to try and find the sublime in nature.

| Posted on 2010-11-05 | by a guest


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the poem is about nature and how the speaker revoke his memory when he was in that location as it\'s known foe wordsworth poetry.It is in blank verse.
thank you
asma

| Posted on 2010-10-26 | by a guest


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to all the people who write random things... STOP
and thankyou, people who actually tried to help
Also , to who so ever this may concern... if u think nicholas is so hot, tell him, dont write it all over the internet.
Stalker. HAHA

| Posted on 2010-10-15 | by a guest


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One of the major themes of the poem is - people\'s change over time.
The title is very clear and literary gives us all the necessary informations like, time, place, date etc. which helps us to understand the poem.
Imagination also plays very important role here.

| Posted on 2010-09-25 | by a guest


.: :.

One of the major themes of the poem is - people\'s change over time.
The title is very clear and literary gives us all the necessary informations like, time, place, date etc. which helps us to understand the poem.
Imagination also plays very important role here.

| Posted on 2010-09-25 | by a guest


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God please help me to get a distinction in literature & a scholarship :( :)

| Posted on 2010-09-19 | by a guest


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Actually they are called stanzas and you can't say that someone's view is wrong and state your view because poetry is an art and like artist say 'the art is in the eye of the beholder' so though you may have your own personal analysis of this poem someone else may look at it a different way but neither nor is wrong

| Posted on 2010-05-25 | by a guest


.: :.

Radeyah Hana Ali. ļ Literatures in English-Module 2
Name of Poem: ¡¥Lines Written a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey On Revisiting the Banks of the Wye During a Tour, July 13, 1798¡¦.
Year: 1798. Month of publication: July Volume published in: Lyrical Ballads.
Form: Ballad (Lyrical Ballad).
Genre: Greater Romantic Lyric.
1.ELEMENTS
Rhyme: ¡¥Tintern Abbey¡¦ is unrhymed. It contains 159 blank verse lines in five verse paragraphs.
Metre & Rhythm: ¡¥Tintern Abbey¡¦ is written in iambic pentameter. An ¡¥iamb¡¦ is a set of two syllables whose pattern goes ¡¥da-DUM¡¦. ¡¥Pentameter¡¦ means that there are five iambs per line, e.g. ¡¥The day is come when I a-gain re-pose¡¦ (l 9), where the underlined parts are enunciated more than those which aren¡¦t underlined.
Diction: (i) The idea of seclusion is repeated at many instances. Some words which point out this seclusion are, ¡¥secluded¡¦ (l 6), ¡¥seclusion¡¦ (l 7), ¡¥quiet¡¦, (l 8), ¡¥repose¡¦ (l 9), ¡¥vagrant¡¦ (l 21), ¡¥houseless¡¦ (l 21), ¡¥hermits¡¦ (l 22), ¡¥alone¡¦ (l 23).
(ii) The word ¡¥green¡¦ is repeated (ls 14 + 18). ¡¥Green¡¦ here represents fertility, life and harmony.
(iii) The reference to time and the repetition of ¡¥Five¡¦ (l 1) emphasize the importance of the passage of time and helps the reader to conceptualize the true meaning of the poem.
Tone: The tone in ¡¥Tintern Abbey¡¦ is tranquil, contemplative, and filled with a longing for times gone by. In the final stanza however, the tone shifts from one of confidence to one of anxiousness.
2.KEY LITERARY DEVICES EXAMPLES, LINE x the poem caesurae occur. Two examples are: (i)¡¦Five years have passed; five summers...¡¦ (l 1). (ii)¡¦deep seclusion; and connect¡¦ (l 7). *Caesurae are used in poetry to signal a pause in the flow of the poem. In ¡¥Tintern Abbey¡¦, these are used to emphasis the passage of time. x from their mountain springs with a sweet inland murmur¡¦ (ls 2-4). *Wordsworth personifies the river in line 4 when he describes the sound it makes as a x speaker says that in anxious sad moments, he ¡¥turned to¡¦ the river ¡¥in spirit¡¦ for guidance and comfort. (ls 55-57). *Wordsworth apostrophizes the river by calling out to it, even though it obviously can¡¦t respond to him in a literal way.
(iv) Simile ¡¥These forms of beauty...as...blind man¡¦s eye¡¦ (ls 24-25). *The speaker uses the simile of the ¡¥blind man¡¦s eye¡¦ to describe the way he was able to see the river valley in his long absence. It¡¦s a negative simile though ¡V he says that it¡¦s not like a ¡¥blind man¡¦s eye.¡¦ In other words, his mind¡¦s eye sees things almost as clearly as his real eyes.
(v) Metaphor *¡¦The language of my...thy wild eyes¡¦ (ls 117-120).
*A second metaphor is used when the speaker talks about the ¡¥shooting lights¡¦ coming out of Dorothy¡¦s eyes. *The speaker uses the metaphor of ¡¥read¡¦[ing] (l 17) to describe what he thought he could sense from looking into Dorothy¡¦s eyes.
*We have to assume that her eyeballs are not literally shooting laser beams. She¡¦s just looking around with such excited pleasure that it¡¦s like her eyes are ¡¥shooting lights¡¦.
3. POINT OF VIEW
The speaker of ¡¥Tintern Abbey¡¦ is the poet, William Wordsworth, himself. These are a few clues in ¡¥Tintern Abbey¡¦ which tells us that this is so;
*First of all, the full title of the poem tells us exactly where, when and under what circumstances the poem was written. So from this, we know that the poet himself visited the spot along the ¡¥Sylvan Wye¡¦ (l 56), and that he¡¦d been there at least once before (he says he¡¦s revisiting it).
*Wordsworth actually had a sister (Dorothy) who lived with him for a lot of his adult life and who did travel with him on his second trip to the Tintern area.
We have to separate the persona and speaker in ¡¥Tintern Abbey¡¦ because we have to keep the speaker straight from the boyish past self that he describes in the poem. One of the major themes of ¡¥Tintern Abbey¡¦ is the way people change over time, so the speaker frequently refers to his past self. The past self is fundamentally different from the person the speaker has become. To differentiate the two, we refer to the speaker of the poem (the present-day Wordsworth) as ¡¥the speaker¡¦, and his boyish self as ¡¥William¡¦.
Even though the speaker can be a bit condescending, he still has the occasional doubt. This doubt is what keeps him human, and can help to keep us from being put off by his occasional arrogance as we read on.
4. LINKS between FORM and MEANING
¡¥Tintern Abbey¡¦ is specifically a ¡¥Lyrical Ballad¡¦. This form is a hybrid of two different kinds of poems, a Lyric and a Ballad. A Lyric is a poem, usually in the first person, which is about the individual speaker. This is demonstrated in ¡¥Tintern Abbey¡¦ as Wordsworth is writing about himself. A Ballad is a narrative poem; i.e. one that tells a story. This is also shown in ¡¥Tintern Abbey¡¦ as the story of what Wordsworth once was to what he has become unfolds. Wordsworth blends the Lyric and the Ballad to create his own hybrid poem, the Lyrical Ballad. Wordsworth and Coleridge¡¦s hybrid is generally considered to have marked the beginning of the Romantic movement in literature. The entire volume of poems in which ¡¥Tintern Abbey¡¦ was published, was called ¡¥Lyrical Ballads¡¦.
5. LINK to Wordsworth¡¦s POETIC THEORY
Wordsworth strongly believed that poetry should be written and read in simple terms. He wanted poetry to be accessible for the ¡§common man.¡¨ Thus, he wrote his poems using simple language. ¡¥Tintern Abbey¡¦ is an example of one of his poems in which he uses simple diction.
6. ISSUES explored in the poem
*Childhood memories of communion with natural beauty. Both generally and specifically, this subject is hugely important in Wordsworth¡¦s work, reappearing in poems as late as the ¡§Intimations of Immortality¡¨ ode. ¡§Tintern Abbey¡¨ is the young Wordsworth¡¦s first great statement of his principle (great) theme: that the memory of pure communion with nature in childhood works upon the mind even in adulthood, when access to that pure communion has been lost, and that the maturity of mind present in adulthood offers compensation for the loss of that communion¡Xspecifically, the ability to ¡§look on nature¡¨ and hear ¡§human music¡¨; that is, to see nature with an eye toward its relationship to human life. In his youth, the poet says, he was thoughtless in his unity with the woods and the river; now, five years since his last viewing of the scene, he is no longer thoughtless, but acutely aware of everything the scene has to offer him. Additionally, the presence of his sister gives him a view of himself as he imagines himself to have been as a youth. Happily, he knows that this current experience will provide both of them with future memories, just as his past experience has provided him with the memories that flicker across his present sight as he travels in the woods.
* The poem also has a subtle strain of religious sentiment; though the actual form of the Abbey does not appear in the poem, the idea of the abbey¡Xof a place consecrated to the spirit¡Xsuffuses the scene, as though the forest and the fields were themselves the speaker¡¦s abbey. This idea is reinforced by the speaker¡¦s description of the power he feels in the setting sun and in the mind of man, which consciously links the ideas of God, nature, and the human mind¡Xas they will be linked in Wordsworth¡¦s poetry for the rest of his life, from ¡§It is a beauteous evening, calm and free¡¨ to the great summation of the Immortality Ode
7. CONTEXT
¡¥Tintern Abbey¡¦ is probably the most famous poem by one of the most famous British Romantic poets. William Wordsworth was writing during the British Romantic period. The Romantic period

| Posted on 2010-02-27 | by a guest


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Well...i actually wanted some in depth analysis for this poem but while coming across some of your comments, i found it more confusing. It's what you believe and this might not be correct. Go on to spark notes, its more reliable:)

| Posted on 2009-09-20 | by a guest


.: :.

“Tintern Abbey”
“Tintern Abbey” is composed in blank verse, which is a name used to describe unrhymed lines in iambic pentameter. Its style is therefore very fluid and natural; it reads as easily as if it were a prose piece. But of course the poetic structure is tightly constructed; Wordsworth’s slight variations on the stresses of iambic rhythms is remarkable. Lines such as “Here, under this dark sycamore, and view” do not quite conform to the stress-patterns of the meter, but fit into it loosely, helping Wordsworth approximate the sounds of natural speech without grossly breaking his meter. Occasionally, divided lines are used to indicate a kind of paragraph break, when the poet changes subjects or shifts the focus of his discourse.
Tintern Abbey opens with the speaker’s declaration that five years have passed since he last visited this location, encountered its tranquil, rustic scenery, and heard the murmuring waters of the river. He recites the objects he sees again, and describes their effect upon him: the “steep and lofty cliffs” impress upon him “thoughts of more deep seclusion”; he leans against the dark sycamore tree and looks at the cottage-grounds and the orchard trees, whose fruit is still unripe. He sees the “wreaths of smoke” rising up from cottage chimneys between the trees, and imagines that they might rise from “vagrant dwellers in the houseless woods,” or from the cave of a hermit in the deep forest.
The speaker then describes how his memory of these “beauteous forms” has worked upon him in his absence from them: when he was alone, or in crowded towns and cities, they provided him with “sensations sweet, / Felt in the blood, and felt along the heart.” The memory of the woods and cottages offered “tranquil restoration” to his mind, and even affected him when he was not aware of the memory, influencing his deeds of kindness and love. He further credits the memory of the scene with offering him access to that mental and spiritual state in which the burden of the world is lightened, in which he becomes a “living soul” with a view into “the life of things.” The speaker then says that his belief that the memory of the woods has affected him so strongly may be “vain”—but if it is, he has still turned to the memory often in times of “fretful stir.”
Even in the present moment, the memory of his past experiences in these surroundings floats over his present view of them, and he feels bittersweet joy in reviving them. He thinks happily, too, that his present experience will provide many happy memories for future years. The speaker acknowledges that he is different now from how he was in those long-ago times, when, as a boy, he “bounded o’er the mountains” and through the streams. In those days, he says, nature made up his whole world: waterfalls, mountains, and woods gave shape to his passions, his appetites, and his love. That time is now past, he says, but he does not mourn it, for though he cannot resume his old relationship with nature, he has been amply compensated by a new set of more mature gifts; for instance, he can now “look on nature, not as in the hour / Of thoughtless youth; but hearing oftentimes / The still, sad music of humanity.” And he can now sense the presence of something far more subtle, powerful, and fundamental in the light of the setting suns, the ocean, the air itself, and even in the mind of man; this energy seems to him “a motion and a spirit that impels / All thinking thoughts.... / And rolls through all things.” For that reason, he says, he still loves nature, still loves mountains and pastures and woods, for they anchor his purest thoughts and guard the heart and soul of his “moral being.”
The speaker says that even if he did not feel this way or understand these things, he would still be in good spirits on this day, for he is in the company of his “dear, dear (d) Sister,” who is also his “dear, dear Friend,” and in whose voice and manner he observes his former self, and beholds “what I was once.” He offers a prayer to nature that he might continue to do so for a little while, knowing, as he says, that “Nature never did betray / The heart that loved her,” but leads rather “from joy to joy.” Nature’s power over the mind that seeks her out is such that it renders that mind impervious to “evil tongues,” “rash judgments,” and “the sneers of selfish men,” instilling instead a “cheerful faith” that the world is full of blessings. The speaker then encourages the moon to shine upon his sister, and the wind to blow against her, and he says to her that in later years, when she is sad or fearful, the memory of this experience will help to heal her. And if he himself is dead, she can remember the love with which he worshipped nature. In that case, too, she will remember what the woods meant to the speaker, the way in which, after so many years of absence, they became more dear to him—both for themselves and for the fact that she is in them.
The subject of “Tintern Abbey” is memory—specifically, childhood memories of communion or a spiritual union with natural beauty. “Tintern Abbey” is the young Wordsworth’s first great statement of his principle theme; that the memory of pure communion or unity with nature in childhood works upon the mind even in adulthood, when access to that pure communion has been lost, and that the maturity of mind present in adulthood offers compensation for the loss of that communion—specifically, the ability to “look on nature” and hear “human music”; that is, to see nature with an eye toward its relationship to human life. In his youth, the poet says, he was thoughtless in his unity with the woods and the river; now, five years since his last viewing of the scene, he is no longer thoughtless, but acutely aware of everything the scene has to offer him. Additionally, the presence of his sister gives him a view of himself as he imagines himself to have been as a youth. Happily, he knows that this current experience will provide both of them with future memories, just as his past experience has provided him with the memories that flicker across his present sight as he travels in the woods.
“Tintern Abbey” is a monologue, imaginatively spoken by a single speaker to himself, referencing the specific objects of its imaginary scene, and occasionally addressing others—once the spirit of nature, occasionally the speaker’s sister. The language of the poem is striking for its simplicity and forthrightness; the young poet is in no way concerned with ostentation. He is instead concerned with speaking from the heart in a plainspoken manner. The poem’s imagery is largely confined to the natural world in which he moves, though there are some castings-out for metaphors ranging from the nautical (the memory is “the anchor” of the poet’s “purest thought”) to the architectural (the mind is a “mansion” of memory).
The poem also has a subtle strain of religious sentiment; though the actual form of the Abbey does not appear in the poem, the idea of the abbey—of a place consecrated to the spirit—suffuses the scene, as though the forest and the fields were themselves the speaker’s abbey. This idea is reinforced by the speaker’s description of the power he feels in the setting sun and in the mind of man, which consciously links the ideas of God, nature, and the human mind—as they will be linked in Wordsworth’s poetry for the rest of his life, from “It is a beauteous evening, calm and free” to the great summation of the Immortality Ode.

| Posted on 2009-08-19 | by a guest


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hi
well this poem was composed when wordsworth take a walk with his sister dorothy in southern wales. wordsworth started to write this poem revisiting the valley.
this poem shows the trascendentalism between god, man and nature

| Posted on 2009-06-09 | by a guest


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This poem is writen in blank verse. This verse is unryhmed iambic pentameter.

| Posted on 2009-06-05 | by a guest


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after having read this poem,sure,ý m a whorshipper of the nature:D

| Posted on 2009-04-02 | by a guest


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hey hi random people who wrights analysis, just here to say nice analysising skills,some of you not all,XD, well thats it, and keep on the good work and answer to question(this is an american page =p) i think..

| Posted on 2009-03-25 | by a guest


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this poem show us the beauty of wanting to return to where u belong.

| Posted on 2009-03-05 | by a guest


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hi! Just wanted to add a comment, don't really have something to add, though ;D
I'm from Germany, and I took English as primary subject, so now we have to analyse and deconstruct and whatsoever all these poems...So it's really helpful for me what you guys are writing ;D by the way is this an english or american page?

| Posted on 2009-01-06 | by a guest


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A hard Question coming .
Discuss the theme of "nature, memory and the growing poetic mind in Tintern Abbey ?

| Posted on 2008-11-10 | by a guest


.: literature :.

u hv not contemplated the idea of pantheism in ur analysis. he finds union with god in nature. god is nature. and he places the poet as a superior being since only poets can meet god in nature, not the ordinary man.

| Posted on 2008-05-31 | by a guest


.: literature :.

u hv not contemplated the idea of pantheism in ur analysis. he finds union with god in nature. god is nature. and he places the poet as a superior being since only poets can meet god in nature, not the ordinary man.

| Posted on 2008-05-31 | by a guest


.: analysis of tintern abbey :.

Tintern Abbey portrays wordsworth's love for nature. He is able to reconnect with nature amongst the mountains, and lofty cliffs, and find comfort in it. The urban life, and his weariness is soothed and he able to revive his soul. Furthermore, to Wordworth nature, epitomised by Tintern Abbey acts as a guide and helps his 'moral being', he states that amongst nature 'we are laid asleep and become living soul'. Nature also allows deep thought, gives him a better understanding of things, a new perspective to life. He recalls his 'boyish' years spent there and recognises how his love and appetite for it has altered but he now has new gifts to take from it.

| Posted on 2008-05-08 | by a guest


.: analysis of tintern abbey :.

Tintern Abbey portrays wordsworth's love for nature. He is able to reconnect with nature amongst the mountains, and lofty cliffs, and find comfort in it. The urban life, and his weariness is soothed and he able to revive his soul. Furthermore, to Wordworth nature, epitomised by Tintern Abbey acts as a guide and helps his 'moral being', he states that amongst nature 'we are laid asleep and become living soul'. Nature also allows deep thought, gives him a better understanding of things, a new perspective to life. He recalls his 'boyish' years spent there and recognises how his love and appetite for it has altered but he now has new gifts to take from it.

| Posted on 2008-05-08 | by a guest


.: Wordsworth Tintern Abbey :.

Tintern Abbey was a popular picturesque location that Wordsworth had read about in a Gilpin Guide book. Turner painted the abbey in 1794 but the abbey itself doesn’t feature in Wordsworth’s poem, in which he is questioning the nature of visual perception, after returning to the abbey, not having seen it for 5 years.
The first part of the extract consists of a rather vague visual description of the scene, which is impressionistic rather than topographic. Nature around the Abbey sparks thoughts in Wordsworth’s minds of seclusion, in which he can contemplate the beauty of the surrounding nature (lines 7-14)
In the second paragraph the landscape fades into the background and remains there for the rest of the poem. Wordsworth is now more concerned with how the scene has affected him, even in his absence and how he doesn’t have to be there to be affected by nature. In a way this is a paradox as he has returned to the place, only to talk about his absence, his time in the city and the future, not about the present. The second part also has the image of landscape as a form of insight, which brings the eye of the soul to life (lines 47-49).
The poem as a whole is an example of the ideology of Romanticism and how the consideration of the external reality of nature leads towards inner contemplation.

| Posted on 2007-11-08 | by a guest


.: Wordsworth :.

There really is only one thing to say to this poem, which helps explain it very much:

"Emotions Recollected in Tranquility"

That is Wordsworth religion. He goes by that like night and day. If you've read any of his subject matter, all of his poems have a stanza, or a line, which perfectly regard E.R.T. The answer to all your questions lines in this idea. If you have any questions about that, read:

"Preface to Lyrical Ballads (1802)"

Its under "The Subject and Language of Poetry" section, possibly on page 239 if you have the right copy. However, he says:

"I have said that poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings: it takes its origin from emotion recollected in tranquility: the emotion is contemplated till by a species of reaction the tranquility gradually disappears, and an emotion, kindred to that which was before the subject of contemplation, is gradually produced..." - William Wordsworth

My work here is done.


| Posted on 2007-10-15 | by a guest


.: SHUUPER DOOPER :.

i lurve nicholas thiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiis much
but he doesnt even know that i like himm more than grand mates :O :(

.

he is shuuper dooper hot and has the best eyes that make me go weak in the knees . whyyyyyyyy wont he make his move?????????????????? WHY?!?!?!

| Posted on 2007-06-20 | by a guest


.: :.

i lurve nicholas thiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiis much
but he doesnt even know that i like himm more than grand mates :O :(

.

he is shuuper dooper hot and has the best eyes that make me go weak in the knees . whyyyyyyyy wont he make his move?????????????????? WHY?!?!?!

| Posted on 2007-06-20 | by a guest


.: helpful questions :.

These are just some questions to help you analyze this poem better
What single image, feeling, or idea in this poem do you think you will remeber longest? Why?
What do you think is menant by the "burden of the mystery" (line 38)?
What three stages of his growing up does the speaker descibe (lines 73-111)?
What "gifts" (line 86) and "abundant recompense" (line 88) does the speaker believe he has recieved for his "loss" (line 87)?
What do you think the speaker means when he says in lines 88-91 that he has heard "the still, sad music of humanity"?
What role does the speaker's sister play in this poem?
What would you say is Wordsworth's attitude toward his past, present, and future?
I know this isn't exactly a place to answer questions but I would like to hear what people think and to disscus them so all of us can figure out what Wordsworth (I love that name!) is really talking about. Thaks so much, everything I have read on here has been really interesting and helpful.

| Posted on 2007-03-11 | by a guest


.: That is not correct :.

first of all... they are not called stanzas... they are called verse paragraphs

second of all... it is not just about how he finds comfort and "adores" a spot on the mountain, but rather, how his view of the spot had changed. The first time he came to the mountain (in his youth) he was just trying to escape the the noise and stress of the city and was amazed by the beauty of the landscape but did not really understand the gift that the landscape had given him. When he returns to the spot as an adult he is able to appreciate the gift that the landscape had given to him and his view of humanity changes. Also he is talking to his sister about how they will always beable to look back on this moment, being on the mountain together, and a sad lesser known fact is that it is believed that his sister had lost her momory and Wordsworth got very angry when he showed the poem to her and she couldn't remember being on the mountain...

| Posted on 2007-01-23 | by a guest


.: That is not correct :.

first of all... they are not called stanzas... they are called verse paragraphs

second of all... it is not just about how he finds comfort and "adores" a spot on the mountain, but rather, how his view of the spot had changed. The first time he came to the mountain (in his youth) he was just trying to escape the the noise and stress of the city and was amazed by the beauty of the landscape but did not really understand the gift that the landscape had given him. When he returns to the spot as an adult he is able to appreciate the gift that the landscape had given to him and his view of humanity changes.

| Posted on 2007-01-23 | by a guest


.: :.

Clearly this is not an accurate source for analyzing Wordsworth's "Tintern Abbey". It seems that literally anyone who finds this site can post a comment about the poem, regardless of it's validity. This poem is dense and confusing; it is much deeper than what appears on the surface. If you too are trying to analyze this poem, try to remember "abundant recompense": that is key...even though you don't have to pay any attention at all to this post because there is a possibility it is not reliable. Good Luck! (but if you really want to learn more about this poem, I suggest sparknotes.com; it's actually very helpful.)

| Posted on 2006-05-17 | by Approved Guest


.: :.

I think that this poem is a fine display of Wordsworth's poetic genious. When I say that I am refering to the detail and vivid imagery that he applied to this work. In the third line of the first stanza Wordsworth describes "waters, rolling from their mountain-springs with a sweet inland murmur." In an attempt to picture that I realize that ther was really no picturing to be done for the simple fact that wordsworth has painted a vibrant masterpiece in the for of 2 lines of poetry. To creat such a powerful image and so few words speaks to his gift of setting the scene for his works effectively and with immediacy. Later he describes "dark sycamores" and "wreathes of smoke sent up, in silence, from among the trees". Here I thought this guy must have been seeing a certain kind of smoke (wink, wink) but then it becomes apparent when you read the rest of the poem that this is simply the way that he is able to describe such wonderful environments in nature.

| Posted on 2006-02-06 | by Approved Guest


.: ture :.

Do you mean everything typed in here is perfect analysis? Sounds like it is true. Good job whoever did this. Ok now how longer should this message be ? 8 lines ? That would be too much. but it doesn't allow me to post this otherwise. I will post it anyway. Good analysis. How are everybody ? Good, fine. Who hates this poem and who like it ? Ok still I am not allowed to post this message. This is fun. I wonder how much I need to write. Ok lets write some general knowledge.

Who discovered Calculus ?
Newton.

Who discovered laws of motion?
Newton

Who discovered gravitatinal force?
Newton

| Posted on 2006-02-06 | by Approved Guest


.: :.

Poem Analysis :.

Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey is about William Wordsworth, and his longing to return to this special place a few miles above Tintern Abbey which he absolutely adores. We can see he has been away from this place for five years, and he always thinks about this magical place with its steep lofty cliffs and its beautiful scenery. He loves the mountain cliffs and springs. He loves the quiet, it gives him a chance to stop and think; seclusion.

In the first stanza, Wordsworth talks about how 5 years have passed since he visited this magical place. He longs to visit the waters from the mountain springs, to hear their soft inland murmur. He wants to see the steep and lofty cliffs that rise up from the ground. He talks about how the day has come when he will return to this wonderful spot. He loves the way that the cottages are, “Mid groves and copses; these pastoral farms, green to the very door.” He loves the way that the greenery goes up to the very doors of the little cottages, and also the way that the wreaths of smoke from the fires in the cottages are sent up in silence from among the trees.

William then goes on in the second stanza to explain how he has longed to return to this place. He has had a long absence from these ‘beauteous forms’. He says how amidst the stress and noise of towns and cities, in hours of weariness, he has only to think about this wonderful place, and he is immediately refreshed.

The third stanza is about how his heart is lightened with the thoughts of this place. He talks about how when he thinks about this place, all the weary weight of this unintelligible world is lifted from him. He is being lead by his affections for this place, and it is affecting how he thinks and acts.

He then talks in the fourth stanza about how this place is like daylight in the darkness of the world. When he can stand the world no longer, he turns his thought to the place he loves. He talks about how he often turns his spirit to this wondrous place, and the repetition of ‘spirit; turned to thee’ emphasises that this beautiful area is incredibly important to him, it always refreshes him.

The fifth stanza is talks about the pleasures he had when he went there, the pictures his mind revives in times of sadness. He came over the hills, and bounded over the mountains. By the sides of the deep rivers and the lonely streams, wherever nature led him. This shows that this young man is entranced by the beauty of nature, it is almost too much for him to take onboard all at once. He ran from the city, he hates it, all noisy and horrible. He would rather have the blue sky and the images of nature. Wordsworth would rather have the beautiful things of nature than anything that man could make.

The last stanza talks about how he would love to take his dear friend along, his sister. He longs to take his sister to this wonderful place, he loves his sister very much, and wants her to experience the joy and happiness of this place, a few miles above Tintern Abbey. The last stanza has a somewhat sadder tone as it talks about how he would love to take his sister to this wonderful area, to show her the same wonderful things that he himself enjoys.

Wordsworth contrasts his reaction to nature when he was a young man to when he was an old man. When he returns to this beautiful place, he finds that his “coarser pleasures of his boyish days” are over. William loves this place so dearly, he calls it the “guardian of my heart”, it keeps him sane during the times away from it, he just has to think about this place and his heart is refreshed.

Wordsworth finds that when he is stressed out or worried, he just has to think about this beautiful place, and all his worries disappear, he finds himself day dreaming about this wonderful place. Wordsworth uses a number of alliterations to emphasise how much he loves this little area that he loves to go to. Sensations sweet. This shows how he thinks about it when he is stressed, and his thoughts refresh him, because he remembers what it was like. Weary weight. This emphasises how depressing the cities and towns that he is in are, and how he longs to free himself from these towns and return to the country, where he loves.

| Posted on 2006-01-23 | by Approved Guest


.: Poem Analysis :.

Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey is about William Wordsworth, and his longing to return to this special place a few miles above Tintern Abbey which he absolutely adores. We can see he has been away from this place for five years, and he always thinks about this magical place with its steep lofty cliffs and its beautiful scenery. He loves the mountain cliffs and springs. He loves the quiet, it gives him a chance to stop and think; seclusion.

In the first stanza, Wordsworth talks about how 5 years have passed since he visited this magical place. He longs to visit the waters from the mountain springs, to hear their soft inland murmur. He wants to see the steep and lofty cliffs that rise up from the ground. He talks about how the day has come when he will return to this wonderful spot. He loves the way that the cottages are, “Mid groves and copses; these pastoral farms, green to the very door.” He loves the way that the greenery goes up to the very doors of the little cottages, and also the way that the wreaths of smoke from the fires in the cottages are sent up in silence from among the trees.

William then goes on in the second stanza to explain how he has longed to return to this place. He has had a long absence from these ‘beauteous forms’. He says how amidst the stress and noise of towns and cities, in hours of weariness, he has only to think about this wonderful place, and he is immediately refreshed.

The third stanza is about how his heart is lightened with the thoughts of this place. He talks about how when he thinks about this place, all the weary weight of this unintelligible world is lifted from him. He is being lead by his affections for this place, and it is affecting how he thinks and acts.

He then talks in the fourth stanza about how this place is like daylight in the darkness of the world. When he can stand the world no longer, he turns his thought to the place he loves. He talks about how he often turns his spirit to this wondrous place, and the repetition of ‘spirit; turned to thee’ emphasises that this beautiful area is incredibly important to him, it always refreshes him.

The fifth stanza is talks about the pleasures he had when he went there, the pictures his mind revives in times of sadness. He came over the hills, and bounded over the mountains. By the sides of the deep rivers and the lonely streams, wherever nature led him. This shows that this young man is entranced by the beauty of nature, it is almost too much for him to take onboard all at once. He ran from the city, he hates it, all noisy and horrible. He would rather have the blue sky and the images of nature. Wordsworth would rather have the beautiful things of nature than anything that man could make.

The last stanza talks about how he would love to take his dear friend along, his sister. He longs to take his sister to this wonderful place, he loves his sister very much, and wants her to experience the joy and happiness of this place, a few miles above Tintern Abbey. The last stanza has a somewhat sadder tone as it talks about how he would love to take his sister to this wonderful area, to show her the same wonderful things that he himself enjoys.

Wordsworth contrasts his reaction to nature when he was a young man to when he was an old man. When he returns to this beautiful place, he finds that his “coarser pleasures of his boyish days” are over. William loves this place so dearly, he calls it the “guardian of my heart”, it keeps him sane during the times away from it, he just has to think about this place and his heart is refreshed.

Wordsworth finds that when he is stressed out or worried, he just has to think about this beautiful place, and all his worries disappear, he finds himself day dreaming about this wonderful place. Wordsworth uses a number of alliterations to emphasise how much he loves this little area that he loves to go to. Sensations sweet. This shows how he thinks about it when he is stressed, and his thoughts refresh him, because he remembers what it was like. Weary weight. This emphasises how depressing the cities and towns that he is in are, and how he longs to free himself from these towns and return to the country, where he loves.



| Posted on 2005-03-14 | by Approved Guest




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