famous poetry
| Famous Poetry | Roleplay | Free Video Tutorials | Online Poetry Club | Free Education | Best of Youtube | Ear Training

Table Turned, The Analysis



Author: Poetry of William Wordsworth Type: Poetry Views: 2135





Up! up! my Friend, and quit your books;

Or surely you'll grow double:

Up! up! my Friend, and clear your looks;

Why all this toil and trouble?



The sun, above the mountain's head,

A freshening lustre mellow

Through all the long green fields has spread,

His first sweet evening yellow.



Books! 'tis a dull and endless strife:

Come, hear the woodland linnet,

How sweet his music! on my life,

There's more of wisdom in it.



And hark! how blithe the throstle sings!

He, too, is no mean preacher:

Come forth into the light of things,

Let Nature be your teacher.



She has a world of ready wealth,

Our minds and hearts to bless--

Spontaneous wisdom breathed by health,

Truth breathed by cheerfulness.



One impulse from a vernal wood

May teach you more of man,

Of moral evil and of good,

Than all the sages can.



Sweet is the lore which Nature brings;

Our meddling intellect

Mis-shapes the beauteous forms of things:--

We murder to dissect.



Enough of Science and of Art;

Close up those barren leaves;

Come forth, and bring with you a heart

That watches and receives.





Sponsor


122 Free Video Tutorials

[Video Tutorial] How to build google chrome extensions

Please add me on youtube. I make free educational video tutorials on youtube such as Basic HTML and CSS.

Free Online Education from Top Universities

Yes! It's true. Online College Education is now free!



||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

The poem \"Tables Turned\" is basically about imagination, romanticism, and nature. It is about experience rather than reading books.

| Posted on 2013-03-28 | by a guest


.: :.

Wordsworth is inviting us for freedom and to join nature by bringing our heart ...the heart that watches and receive .... come forth into the light... their\'s a relationship between man and nature and certain balance should occur between them ...this is a certain philosophy which is the reflection of mind .

| Posted on 2012-08-21 | by a guest


.: :.

it is blunt, but that is the point. It is just saying \'oi! you scholars, look out your window, look at what you are missing out on while you are studying.\' Nature gives free knowledge if you observe, so why murder to dissect, why murder to learn? If you are willing to receive,nature will present its intellect to you

| Posted on 2011-11-12 | by a guest


.: :.

Wordsworth tries to say in his poem \"the tables turned\" books are just a mere book what matters most is how we practically apply it into the real world through our actual experiences... Still experie
nce is the best teacher

| Posted on 2011-01-25 | by a guest


.: :.

Wordsworth tries to say in his poem \"the tables turned\" books are just a mere book what matters most is how we practically apply it into the real world through our actual experiences... Still experie
nce is the best teacher

| Posted on 2011-01-25 | by a guest


.: :.

Wordsworth tries to say in his poem \"the tables turned\" books are just a mere book what matters most is how we practically apply it into the real world through our actual experiences... Still experie
nce is the best teacher

| Posted on 2011-01-25 | by a guest


.: :.

\'Up!up!\' for modern readers could give connotations of Harry potter and the philosophers stone. this would cement the theme that wordsworth sees book as \'evil\'and \'unnatural\' and this is cemented further \'toil and trouble\' this is what the witches say in Macbeth

| Posted on 2010-12-11 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem is NOT about God (or at least a God from an organised religion), it is about nature. The narrator expresses the idea that the tables are turned upon the sicentific and logical world view of his day. It is nature that should be the teacher "of things" because "we murder to dissect". Wordsworth was not religious at this time, and it is very important to make this distinction as many believe he is talking about the nature through which God made all things but this is not the case.

| Posted on 2010-03-28 | by a guest


.: :.

"the table turned" is one of the important poems which Wordsworth portrays, present and express some of the main features of the romantic spirit.
In the first stanza, the poet invites his friend to leave his books offer is very little. they cause "toil and trouble"and add little to man. The alliteration on /t/ between "toil" and "trouble" intensifies the companionship of these two effects and consequences of reading books.The poet asserts that if he neglects and quits his books , he will "grow double" in his understanding of Nature with "clear looks" so as to appreciate its beauty and holiness. The repetition of"Up!" in the stanza expresses the poet's great concern in his attempt to convince and encourage his friend to change his attitude to life and nature.

| Posted on 2010-03-25 | by a guest


.: :.

"the table turned" is one of the important poems which Wordsworth portrays, present and express some of the main features of the romantic spirit.
In the first stanza, the poet invites his friend to leave his books offer is very little. they cause "toil and trouble"and add little to man. The alliteration on /t/ between "toil" and "trouble" intensifies the companionship of these two effects and consequences of reading books.The poet asserts that if he neglects and quits his books , he will "grow double" in his understanding of Nature with "clear looks" so as to appreciate its beauty and holiness. The repetition of"Up!" in the stanza expresses the poet's great concern in his attempt to convince and encourage his friend to change his attitude to life and nature.

| Posted on 2010-03-25 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem is teaching us to accept what God has provided for us...take great advantage of it instead of over thinking it and abusing the great and magnificent beauties of nature. Love it while it lasts.

| Posted on 2009-10-24 | by a guest


.: :.

writing 5 pages on this is not as hard as it sounds
while the theme may be amazingly simple, keep in mind there are many ways to analyze the poem. you can focus on diction, imagery, tone or structure and how all of these things tie into the theme. if it helps any this is a pastoral poem
have fun with the essay, i got one due tommorow on this and another poem

| Posted on 2009-04-06 | by a guest


.: :.

5 pages? yikes, well yes I'm afraid it really is as blunt as it sounds, you could talk about how he makes it sound like he does tho. It's not a speech or a reprimand on those who spend their time in books it is more coaxing and teasing. The quatrain rhyme scheme makes it feel sing song like and completely guileless. The tone is equally happy and cheerful. The vivid natural imagery he provides also help to lure a bookworm away from his studies and outside.

| Posted on 2009-04-05 | by a guest


.: :.

It is as blunt as it seems because it is telling people to live life, not read about it. He is specificaly adressing Bookwroms, who would find themselves reading this

| Posted on 2009-02-17 | by a guest


.: :.

Of course this is what the poem is about. He is trying to be blunt to prevent one from even further divulging in his "barren leaves." Even his rhyme scheme is plain and simple. He doesn't want us to dive in, he wants us to read it as bluntly as we can, so we don't waste a moment and can hurry up and experience what lies beyond his pages.

| Posted on 2009-01-29 | by a guest


.: :.

i think he was actually saying that after you have read this poem, put down you books and pencil, drop classes and go out to learn about the world by nature.

| Posted on 2008-12-08 | by a guest


.: :.

You can't ever really know anything if you always learn through other's experiences (books). You have to experience life for yourself to truly learn anything.

| Posted on 2008-12-03 | by a guest


.: :.

Imagination against reason. Reason is the books and imagination is nature. Wordsworth suggests following your imagination rather than reasoning.

| Posted on 2008-10-30 | by a guest


.: :.

Wordsworth advices us to "Let Nature be your teacher", and "quit your books". Can we stop reading Lyrical Ballads at this point then? Hopefully. Why do English teachers not take his advice. Lyrical B*ll*cks.

| Posted on 2008-05-16 | by a guest


.: :.

This poem compares Nature with what man makes (Science, Books, "Knowledge", and Art)
The last two stanzas critisizes those who attempt to explain the world, destroy the beauty in nature when doing so. "-We murder to dissect"... Instead we should just observe life around us, accept it with "wise passiveness" (Expostulation And Reply)

| Posted on 2008-04-28 | by a guest


.: :.

Well, I guess that Wordsworth contradicts himself here Because he asks us not to read and not to do anything that is related to education!
So how are we supposed to do so, when we read his poems?
Is he asking us not to read his poems? and just meditate in nature? So why did right them in the first place?

| Posted on 2008-04-09 | by a guest


.: :.

The poem "The Tables Turned" is in reply to the poem "Expostulation and Reply" where the speaker wants to send across the message that experiencing things are a much better way to learn than of just reading books and trying to learn just through that.
hope that helped!
cheers mwah xx

| Posted on 2008-03-17 | by a guest


.: :.

srsly...what is this poem about?? is it as blunt as it seems? wordsworth seems to be simply making a statement. is there no symbolic depth in this piece of poetry? is there nothing here which enables me to write a 5 page essay on?

| Posted on 2008-03-07 | by a guest




Post your Analysis




Message

Free Online Education from Top Universities

Yes! It's true. College Education is now free!







Most common keywords

Table Turned, The Analysis William Wordsworth critical analysis of poem, review school overview. Analysis of the poem. literary terms. Definition terms. Why did he use? short summary describing. Table Turned, The Analysis William Wordsworth Characters archetypes. Sparknotes bookrags the meaning summary overview critique of explanation pinkmonkey. Quick fast explanatory summary. pinkmonkey free cliffnotes cliffnotes ebook pdf doc file essay summary literary terms analysis professional definition summary synopsis sinopsis interpretation critique Table Turned, The Analysis William Wordsworth itunes audio book mp4 mp3 mit ocw Online Education homework forum help



Poetry 82
Poetry 220
Poetry 28
Poetry 79
Poetry 172
Poetry 139
Poetry 57
Poetry 128
Poetry 132
Poetry 41
Poetry 147
Poetry 87
Poetry 204
Poetry 194
Poetry 40
Poetry 170
Poetry 77
Poetry 94
Poetry 35
Poetry 38