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Song (Go And Catch A Falling Star) Analysis



Author: Poetry of John Donne Type: Poetry Views: 8616

Go and catch a falling star,

Get with child a mandrake root,

Tell me where all past years are,

Or who cleft the Devil's foot,

Teach me to hear mermaids singing,

Or to keep off envy's stinging,

And find

What wind

Serves to advance an honest mind.If thou be'st born to strange sights,

Things invisible to see,

Ride ten thousand days and nights,

Till age snow white hairs on thee;

Thou, when thou return'st, wilt tell me

All strange wonders that befell thee,

And swear

No where

Lives a woman true, and fair.If thou find'st one, let me know,

Such a pilgrimage were sweet;

Yet do not, I would not go,

Though at next door we might meet:

Though she were true, when you met her,

And last, till you write your letter,

Yet she

Will be

False, ere I come, to two or three.






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||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

.: :.

this poem is of john donne views about weomen so it is wrong to impose this on other human beings

| Posted on 2013-10-26 | by a guest


.: :.

Different people in all countries take the credit loans in different creditors, because it is comfortable.

| Posted on 2013-07-30 | by a guest


.: :.

\"Some of this analysis is utterly tragic.\"
YO ITS NOT TRAGIC ITS SAD.

| Posted on 2013-02-21 | by a guest


.: :.

\"Some of this analysis is utterly tragic.\"
YO ITS NOT TRAGIC ITS SAD.

| Posted on 2013-02-21 | by a guest


.: :.

No... this is not metaphorically comparing songs with poems. John Donne begins by listing impossible feats, the challenges the receiver of this message to seek out and locate a woman who is decent and honest; however, it is implied by what was previously stated (in the first stanza, with its impossible tasks) that he believes it to be impossible for the boy to accomplish this quest of seeking a worthy woman. If by some stroke of fortune, the boy is able to complete this task, John Donne-or the speaker which he intends to embody-believes that she, like every other will prove to be imperfect. Too good to be true...

| Posted on 2012-08-04 | by a guest


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the poem go and catch a falling star can be revealed as a special impression on love!here,the poet tends to give out the frailties of the women and says that as a whole all females are liars but,indirectly he states that ugly women are truthful by the line \"lives a woman true,and faire\"here the word \"faire\"means beauty.

| Posted on 2012-07-23 | by a guest


.: :.

One knows that today\'s life is not very cheap, but we require cash for various issues and not every person earns big sums cash. Thence to receive fast credit loans and just college loan would be a correct way out.

| Posted on 2012-03-16 | by a guest


.: :.

Analysis of John Donne’s ‘Song’
Donne’s poem ‘Song’ reveals the impossibilities of life, the rarest and greatest being a woman who is both virtuous, true and fair. This is seen as paradoxical as it contrasts the Petrachen conventions at the time, placing women as the height of all greatness and placed on pedestals. ‘Teach me to hear mermaids singing’ shows Donne’s condemnation of women at the very start of the poem; by comparing women to mermaids he is implying that it is mythical to find a woman who is perfect. The use of the mythical creatures mermaids also create connotations for the reader of death, as mermaids are seen as luring men in with false beauty only then to drag them down to the depths of the ocean. Donne’s use of metaphor here shows an instant condemnation of women as a whole, not one in particular but all the women around the world. This hyperbolic language and use of the imperative creates harshness in the words, despite being used to describe something of beauty, however the use of rhyme is arguably quite simple (ABABCCDDD) and so giving it a childlike rhythm. Therefore giving emphasising Donne stating that women are simple and arguably boring for anything but sexual relations, this implies that the women are seen as a joke and cannot be taken seriously, however it is possibly saying that the ideas in the poem are not serious and so Donne is doing this as a ‘joke’. In additonal the mermaids song can also be described as soothing, and comforting to men, possibly referring to Donne’s childhood and his Mother’s love for music – shown here to be both soothing, like a mother should be, heightening the supposed hatred for women by hating his mother. The use of myths is seen prior the this quote when Donne writes ‘Get with a child a mandrake root,’ which is seen as another mythical legend, supposedly when being uprooted screams, killing all who hear it. Furthermore it was said to have formed when a dead or man was hanged and his semen dripped onto the ground, and in some accounts forming a soulless woman. This further indicates the cynicism Donne shows towards women, even though something as ‘great’ as man is needed to create woman, they are still seen as impure and finding a virtuous woman is impossible. Additionally the use of end stopped lines reiterates each of the imperatives used by Donne, making each of them stand out making them appear even more impossible, reaffirming his attitude to women.
Donne arguably intends the poem to be a Satire, as he uses biting irony for comical effect, usually sarcasm as a way to expose and humiliate women. Critics argue that ‘Poems like song frequently lead critics and readers to accuse Donne of unmitigated cynicism.’ This is apparent in all however it is only in stanza two where we are made apparent to the subject matter, woman. Prior to this we are just told about the and only now are we told that the virtuous woman is also seen as impossibility to Donne. This reaffirms the Critic’s view that Donne uses unmitigated cynicism as he is saying that there is no woman, nowhere which is both virtuous. Donne then brings back in the motif’s of the myth saying that a virtuous woman is in itself a myth, and if by a rare occurrence you find one she will cheat on you by the time you tell him [Donne]. This unmitigated cynicism shown by Donne
.

| Posted on 2011-10-14 | by a guest


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A single father whose wife has deserted him for another man is sending his son out for his Wanderjahr. He teasingly tells his son to do all these magical things, but quickly realizes that he truly wants to believe in strange magical wonders, and experience them vicariously through his son. He finishes by cautioning his son that the only thing that is really impossible is a woman both true and fair.

| Posted on 2011-08-17 | by a guest


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what are the love scenarios in john donnes poetry ? illustrateanswer with a close reading of three poems

| Posted on 2011-08-16 | by a guest


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\'Song\' is one of the the famous poems of John Donne. Donne through this poem states that even the most impossible things in this world could be found, but not a woman who is beautiful and virtuous. He writes this at a time in history when people believed that all woman who are beautiful on the outside are also the same in heart. They thought that the outer beauty is the reflection of the inner self. Donne strongly disagrees with the same. He does not say that an ugly woman would be virtuous. He is only concerned with beautiful woman of his time. He says that even if such a woman would be found, before he even writes a letter to her, she\'ll have lost her virtue.

| Posted on 2011-07-07 | by a guest


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This poem reveals along with many other impossibilities,the rarest and greatest impossibility as the existence of a woman true and fair. It serves to parody the petrachan conventions. In relation to this it dismantles the vision and idea of idealised love and the petrachan goddess.

| Posted on 2011-05-01 | by a guest


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Some of this analysis is utterly tragic. It could be argued that the title \'Song\' is an allusion to poetry itself, but to claim this work is \'not about women\' at all is illogical. In searching for a more profound interpretation you have reached a conclusion that is ironically shallow. Donne is drawing a parallel between his search for a metaphysical experience in religion with his yearning for a similar experience in love. His search for spiritual purity in religion is hampered by idolatry; reference to the \'Devil\'s foot\' and fallen angels- \'a falling star\'- reflects the fact that these divine images are too human to be ideal. Similarly, love as an idealised spiritual experience is rendered implausible by physical lust and infidelity. Although Donne\'s tone is cynical, it is likely that he is encouraging us not to abandon our conceits. After all, his own ideals are embodied within his poetry or his \'song\', which has been suggested as an interpretation. Donne yearns for a reality in the legends to which he refers. Unfortunately, like the \'song\' of the mermaids, the conceits of his poetry are fictitious and elusive in reality.
Tempz

| Posted on 2011-04-19 | by a guest


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I think the answer might be between the two: the work is about poetry and about women. If you capture a moment exactly in a letter, still, the circumstance will have changed by the time you have posted it.

| Posted on 2011-02-13 | by a guest


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Here\'s how I interpret it: The persona would be lucky (catching a fallen star) to find a worthy woman and such a woman is mythological. (Mermaids are mythological). If he searches his whole life, he will never find her. By the time he gets your letter about the perfect woman, she will already be taken. (It will be false even if you are next door)

| Posted on 2011-02-07 | by a guest


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This poem is obviously a metaphor Donne\'s favorite song, also called Song. Growing up, Donne\'s mother was a prostitute as well as a great violin player. This caused him to have a great fear of sex, women, and also stringed instruments.

| Posted on 2011-02-03 | by a guest


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My Professor on College Gave Me A wrong idea about the poem Song.how bullshit i listen to him.

| Posted on 2011-01-28 | by a guest


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You are all IDIOTS. None of you should ever post on a literary analysis website again. This \"Song\" is not about women--it\'s a metaphor for poetry. Hence the title SONG. HELLO???

| Posted on 2011-01-03 | by a guest


.: :.

the beauty of dis poem is that it can be viewed in different perspectives.one such view is as below
maybe JD expresses the thought of a woman whose lover is parting away for a long journey.
in d 1st stanza,she tries to comfort herself bt finds it difficult to ease herself (teach me to hear mermaids singing Or to keep off envy\'s sting)
in d 2nd stanza, she tells her lover dat whatsoever may it be, even if he returns wen he is old , to tell her his experiences n dat nowhere lives a woman who is as true and fair as she
in d last stanza , she expresses her fear of her lover meeting another woman bt yet she wishes her fear to be false. she lives wid a hope dat one day she will meet her lover again.she tells him dat even if he finds another woman, in d beginning she will seem true to him bt eventually he will realize dat she is d true woman for him n not the other woman...

| Posted on 2010-08-28 | by a guest


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A wonderful poem ...stating that its impossible to find a women true and fair...if u find such...before ur letter reaches to her ....she hav been with others meanwhile...

| Posted on 2010-07-19 | by a guest


.: :.

Possibly written after a love's deception, in his typical witty, ironic style John Donne takes a 'literary revenge' over the treaching women. The first stanza starts with the description of actions, all of which have kind of a double level of impossibility: one one side they are mithological objects or creature, on the other side he asks to do with them something which would not even be possible according to the rules of the mithological world, like getting a mandrake root with a child instead of reverse, learning hear the singing of mermaid (note that Ulysses did not learn to hear the singing of mermaids, he kind of 'cheated' by getting tied to the pole of the ship). In the end of the first stanza starts the parallel between things whose impossiblity is clearly perceived by logic, and things which should not be impossible but turn out to be so 'keep off envy's stinging'. 'what wind serves to advance an hones mind' (compare w. Shakespeare, Hamlet, 'the spurns that patient merit from the unworthy takes').
The second stanza keeps rising suspence- for now, we still don't know what the point is- until we are suddendly revealed the main 'message' of the poem, the impossibilty of finding a woman both true (honest) and fair (beautiful). It is important to recall the humour that always compenetrate J. D's poems, and the way he likes to play with the reader letting him guess things he does not say.
The last stanza contains the final joke of the poem, like if the poet was really having a conversaton with the man born to see invisible things (which the reader is instinctively identifying with, as J.D. uses 'talks' with him) and that man was answering that such a woman does exist. Like in a rethorical trick, J. D. assumes his opponent's view, and finds a new contradiction: even if such a woman existed, she would not stay true for even the shortest trip, just having to go next door.
(Maybe those who say that this poem refers to Virgin Mary or the Queen shold give a bit more insight about it; escpecially when comapred with other poems, looking at the mithological imprint of the poem, at the lgihtness and humour of the tone, there's no apparent reason to think about a 'transcendental meaning')

| Posted on 2010-06-12 | by a guest


.: :.

Analysis -
Donne starts off the poem by stating impossible feats, such as to catch a falling star, and to get a child with a mandrake root. The mandrake root is a type of European herb that resembles a man. And using the fact that men cannot bear a child, brings into the reality of impossibility. Using the same concept of the first few stanzas, he compares the impossibility of the feats to finding a women is that is fair, single, and a virgin. He ends the poem, saying that by the time he'd sent the love letter, she would already be with another man, or two.

| Posted on 2010-04-20 | by a guest


.: :.

John Donne (another contemporary of Shakespeare) expresses his doubts about finding the perfect female. Whether this is because his heart has been broken (as some analysts have guessed) or because the only truly perfect woman is the Virgin Mary/ Glorianna the Virgin Queen/ Elizabeth I who reigned during much of his lifetime is unknown. However, “Virgin Mary = Virgin Queen” imagery was politically favorable with her. Implying, “Majesty, you're the Only One,” would certainly have gone over well at court.

| Posted on 2010-02-11 | by a guest


.: :.

She cannot find a "true and fair" woman because the only "true and fair" woman is Virgin Mary, the biological mother of Jesus (Jesus which is the mandrake root because he is not human but the son of God. But he has the ability to take a human form).

| Posted on 2010-02-07 | by a guest


.: :.

A very crafty poem that shows Donne's view on women in general, but only his view. It seems as though the poem is itching for the reader to figure out an answer to a riddle because of the imagery and ideas Donne paints in the mind. He uses witty, subtle, and argumentative words to express feelings as well as a colloquial tone that at the same time tries to reach beyond the meaning. This poem does show a side of the speaker that is maybe heartbroken or hurt by a woman.

| Posted on 2008-12-01 | by a guest


.: :.

The last stanza when the letter is mentioned it is very possible he referrs to a letter reaching him, the author, and by the time it reaches him she would no longer be true.
In the first Stanza mandrake root, othetr than taking a human form is also poisonous for consumption and if found by a woman she would become pregnant, so "Get with child a mandrake root" you cannot ipregnate a plant, much less one that takes teh form of a male but mayhap that was not his only meaning....

| Posted on 2008-10-07 | by a guest


.: :.

Song (Go And Catch A Falling Star) Analysis John Donne critical analysis of poem, review school overview. Analysis of the poem. literary terms. Definition terms. Why did he use? short summary describing. Song (Go And Catch A Falling Star) Analysis John Donne Characters archetypes. Sparknotes bookrags the meaning summary overview critique of explanation pinkmonkey. Quick fast explanatory summary. pinkmonkey free cliffnotes cliffnotes ebook pdf doc file essay summary literary terms analysis professional definition summary synopsis sinopsis interpretation critique Song (Go And Catch A Falling Star) Analysis John Donne itunes audio book mp4 mp3 mit ocw Online Education

| Posted on 2008-03-30 | by a guest


.: :.

Catch a falling star - is imposable
Which means that "catch" a virgin woman is imposable too

| Posted on 2008-03-17 | by a guest


.: :.

The poem talks about the difficulties to find a woman that is both single and virginal.

"Though she were true, when you met her,
And last, till you write your letter,
Yet she
Will be
False, ere I come, to two or three."

Stating that by the time you have found this supposedly fair and "true" woman, by the time you write a love letter to her she would have already slept with several men, therefore the persona believes that it is hard to find a true woman and uses the myths at the beginning of the poem to back up this arguement.


| Posted on 2007-05-23 | by a guest


.: poetic analysis :.

The first stanza refers to utter imposibilities, it is not possible to catch a falling star, in the time, a falling star was a thing of great destruction (it is of course referring to a comet). A mandrake root is a plant which can take human form, however when it does is always male, meaning it is impossible to make pregnant. Mermaids, as referred to in the fifth line are mythological greek creatures who with their singing lured sailors to their deaths, by sitting on rocks and enchanting the brain of a sailor to crash, whilst the mermaid slipped enigmatically away. The utter frustration with this scenario is that mermaids were actually genderless, which meant that their beauty was for nothing but to kill, it was said that as soon as the singing of a siren was heard, you were doomed to certain death (the only one to have escaped this fate was oddysseus). Envies stinging was supposed to be imposible to avoid, envy is often anthropomorphasised as a scorpion, and once a scorpion has you in it's vice, just as envy does, it is impossible to escape. The next 11 lines are referring to the fact that the previous were all impossibilities, however they are more likely to happen than to find a woman fair and true the following lines, up to the end suggest that even if one were to find a woman fair and true, she would stay that way for so little time that when she were brought to him, she would no longer be.

| Posted on 2007-03-06 | by a guest


.: poetic analysis :.

The first stanza refers to utter imposibilities, it is not possible to catch a falling star, in the time, a falling star was a thing of great destruction (it is of course referring to a comet). A mandrake root is a plant which can take human form, however when it does is always male, meaning it is impossible to make pregnant. Mermaids, as referred to in the fifth line are mythological greek creatures who with their singing lured sailors to their deaths, by sitting on rocks and enchanting the brain of a sailor to crash, whilst the mermaid slipped enigmatically away. The utter frustration with this scenario is that mermaids were actually genderless, which meant that their beauty was for nothing but to kill, it was said that as soon as the singing of a siren was heard, you were doomed to certain death (the only one to have escaped this fate was oddysseus). Envies stinging was supposed to be imposible to avoid, envy is often anthropomorphasised as a scorpion, and once a scorpion has you in it's vice, just as envy does, it is impossible to escape. The next 11 lines are referring to the fact that the previous were all impossibilities, however they are more likely to happen than to find a woman fair and true the following lines, up to the end suggest that even if one were to find a woman fair and true, she would stay that way for so little time that when she were brought to him, she would no longer be.

| Posted on 2007-03-06 | by a guest


.: :.

The persona in this poem, which is also a dramatic monologue, is telling his listener about the fickleness and inconstancy of women. His use of mythological charactes and situations suggests that a constant woman is also just a figment of the imagination. In the second stanza, he tells his listener that if they were to ride for an age they would still never be able to find a woman who is "true, and fair". And, he continues in the thrid stanza, even if he did, by the time the persona meets her, she will have shown her true colours.

| Posted on 2005-05-08 | by Approved Guest




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Song (Go And Catch A Falling Star) Analysis John Donne critical analysis of poem, review school overview. Analysis of the poem. literary terms. Definition terms. Why did he use? short summary describing. Song (Go And Catch A Falling Star) Analysis John Donne Characters archetypes. Sparknotes bookrags the meaning summary overview critique of explanation pinkmonkey. Quick fast explanatory summary. pinkmonkey free cliffnotes cliffnotes ebook pdf doc file essay summary literary terms analysis professional definition summary synopsis sinopsis interpretation critique Song (Go And Catch A Falling Star) Analysis John Donne itunes audio book mp4 mp3 mit ocw Online Education homework forum help



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