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To Thyrza: And Thou Art Dead Analysis



Author: poem of Lord Byron Type: poem Views: 12

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And thou art dead, as young and fair
As aught of mortal birth;
And form so soft and charm so rare
Too soon returned to Earth!
Though Earth received them in her bed,
And o'er the spot the crowd may tread
In carelessness or mirth,
There is an eye which could not brook
A moment on that grave to look.

I will not ask where thou liest low,
Nor gaze upon the spot;
There flowers or weeds at will may grow,
So I behold them not:
It is enough for me to prove
That what I loved, and long must love,
Like common earth can rot;
To me there needs no stone to tell
'Tis Nothing that I loved so well.

Yet did I love thee to the last
As fervently as thou,
Who didst not change through all the past,
And canst not alter now.
The love where Death has set his seal
Nor age can chill, nor rival steal,
Nor falsehood disavow:
And, what were worse, thou canst not see
Or wrong or change or fault in me.

The better days of life were ours;
The worst can be but mine:
The sun that cheers, the storm that lours,
Shall never more be thine.
The silence of that dreamless sleep
I envy now too much to weep;
Nor need I to repine
That all those charms have passed away
I might have watched through long decay.

The flower in ripened bloom unmatched
Must fall the earliest prey;
Though by no hand untimely snatched,
The leaves must drop away:
And yet it were a greater grief
To watct it withering, leaf by leaf,
Than see it plucked today;
Since earthly eye but ill can bear
To trace the change to foul from fair.

I know not if I could have borne
To see thy beauties fade;
The night that followed such a morn
Had worn a deeper shade:
Thy day without a cloud hath past,
And thou wert lovely to the last—
Extinguished, not decayed,
As stars that shoot along the sky
Shine brightest as they fall from high.

As once I wept, if I could weep,
My tears might well be shed
To think I was not near to keep
One vigil o'er thy bed:
To gaze, how fondly! on thy face,
To fold thee in a faint embrace,
Uphold thy drooping head,
And show that love, however vain,
Nor thou nor I can feel again.

Yet how much less it were to gain,
Though thou hast left me free,
The loveliest things that still remain
Than thus remember thee!
The all of thine that cannot die
Through dark and dread Eternity
Returns again to me,
And more thy buried love endears
Than aught, except its living years.

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.: :.

Lord Byron was a complex man. in this poem he describes a \"love\" for a girl that is ended dramatically after she dies... the rest is filler and shows lord byrons dramatic side. he was a lady pleaser... i think this was merely a lure to engage with women.
The Don

| Posted on 2013-03-07 | by a guest


.: :.

Written to one of his many followers of the time (Byron was highly popular and had many women admirers). Through stanzas 5-7 he speaks to how she died young and how she was \"extinguish\'d, not decay\'d\", and that she was \"untimely snatch\'d\". Although, he doesn\'t promise to visit her grave as many a person would having had a friend or family member die, he instead figures that her love for him will penetrate the life-death barrier. He does say he\'ll remember her, but \"thou hast left me free\". This line in particular sparks a notion that she was just a fling of his, and they didn\'t have a serious emotional attachment at the time.

| Posted on 2011-03-17 | by a guest




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